Single Sign-On Made Easy with Keycloak / Red Hat SSO

If you’re looking for a single sign-on solution (SSO) that enables you to secure new or legacy applications and easily use federated identity providers (IdP) such as social networks, you should definitely take a look at Keycloak. Keycloak is the upstream open source community project for Red Hat Single Sign-On (RH-SSO). RH-SSO is a core service that is part of a number of  products such as Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform. If you’ve logged into to or you are using Keycloak.

On the Red Hat Developer blog there have been a number of recent articles that cover various aspects Keycloak/RH-SSO integration.  A recent DevNation Live Tech Talk covered Securing Spring Boot Microservices with Keycloak. This article discusses the features of Keycloak/RH-SSO that you should be aware of.

Continue reading “Single Sign-On Made Easy with Keycloak / Red Hat SSO”


Open vSwitch-DPDK: How Much Hugepage Memory?


In order to maximize performance of the Open vSwitch DPDK datapath, it pre-allocates hugepage memory. As a user you are responsible for telling Open vSwitch how much hugepage memory to pre-allocate. The question of exactly what value to use often arises. The answer is, it depends.

There is no simple answer as it depends on things like the MTU size of the ports, the MTU differences between ports, and whether those ports are on the same NUMA node. Just to complicate things a bit more, there are multiple overheads, and alignment and rounding need to be accounted for at various places in OVS-DPDK. Everything clear? OK, you can stop reading then!
However, if not, read on.

Continue reading “Open vSwitch-DPDK: How Much Hugepage Memory?”


Announcing: Node.js General Availability in Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Node.js Foundation Logo


Today Red Hat is making Node.js generally available to Red Hat customers through a subscription to Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR). RHOAR provides application developers with a variety of application runtimes running on the OpenShift Container Platform.

Node.js is based on the V8 JavaScript engine and allows you to write server-side JavaScript applications. Node.js joins the existing set of supported runtimes and offers developers an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.

Continue reading “Announcing: Node.js General Availability in Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes”


MicroProfile Fault Tolerance in WildFly Swarm

Every developer has the goal of building the most resilient application possible. Due to the distributed nature of microservices, resiliency and handling failures gracefully is mandatory. The Java ecosystem has some nice frameworks for fault tolerance, such as Hystrix or Failsafe. However, none of these provide a standard API, so using them means your application will be tightly coupled to that framework. The primary motivation for the MicroProfile specifications is to provide standard APIs that eliminates the tight coupling and improves deployment flexibility. This article will describe the main features of the MicroProfile Fault Tolerance specification, and then demonstrate how it was implemented in WildFly Swarm, the Red Hat MicroProfile implementation.

Continue reading “MicroProfile Fault Tolerance in WildFly Swarm”


Red Hat Summit 2018 to focus on Modern App Development

On behalf of the selection teams for Modern Application Development, I am pleased to share this exciting, dynamic, and diverse set of developer-related breakouts, workshops, BoFs, and labs for Red Hat Summit 2018.

With these 61+ sessions listed below, we believe that every attending application developer will come away with a strong understanding of where Red Hat is headed in this app dev space, and obtain a good foundation for tackling that next generation of apps. Encompassing various aspects of Modern App Dev, some sub-topics we’ve focused on are around microservices, service mesh, security and AI/ML, plus there is a large collection of complementary and related topics.

So…if you’re an application developer, we invite you to attend Red Hat Summit 2018 and experience the code first hand. There’s something for everyone and definitely something for you. Register today.

Great talks don’t happen without great speakers, and we feel really privileged to have these popular, high-in-demand speakers:

Continue reading “Red Hat Summit 2018 to focus on Modern App Development”


IoT Developer Survey – Deadline March 5, 2018

We are seeking input from Internet of Things (#IoT) developers to better understand their needs for software and related tools. Whether you’re a hacker instrumenting your home with Raspberry Pi, or an IT developer working on Industrial IoT solutions, we want to know how you’re using open source technologies to build your IoT solution. The output from this survey will help the open source community focus on the resources most needed by IoT developers.

The survey is organized by the Eclipse IoT Working Group, IEEE IoT Initiative, the Open Mobile Alliance, and the AGILE-IoT H2020 Research Project.

Take the IoT Developer Survey NOW

The survey deadline is this Monday, March 5, 2018.
Don’t procrastinate — take the survey now:

This survey should take you about 10 minutes to complete.


A Practical Introduction to Container Terminology

You might think containers seem like a pretty straightforward concept, so why do I need to read about container terminology? In my work as a container technology evangelist, I’ve encountered misuse of container terminology that causes people to stumble on the road to mastering containers. Terms like containers and images are used interchangeably, but there are important conceptual differences. In the world of containers, repository has a different meaning than what you’d expect. Additionally, the landscape for container technologies is larger than just docker. Without a good handle on the terminology, It can be difficult to grasp the key differences between docker and (pick your favorites, CRI-O, rkt, lxc/lxd) or understand what the Open Container Initiative is doing to standardize container technology.


It is deceptively simple to get started with Linux Containers. It takes only a few minutes to install a container engine like docker and run your first commands. Within another few minutes, you are building your first container image and sharing it. Next, you begin the familiar process of architecting a production-like container environment, and have the epiphany that it’s necessary to understand a lot of terminology and technology behind the scenes. Worse, many of the following terms are used interchangeably… often causing quite a bit of confusion for newcomers.

  • Container
  • Image
  • Container Image
  • Image Layer
  • Registry
  • Repository
  • Tag
  • Base Image
  • Platform Image
  • Layer

Understanding the terminology laid out in this technical dictionary will provide you a deeper understanding of the underlying technologies. This will help you and your teams speak the same language and also provide insight into how to better architect your container environment for the goals you have. As an industry and wider community, this deeper understanding will enable us to build new architectures and solutions. Note, this technical dictionary assumes that the reader already has an understanding of how to run containers. If you need a primer, try starting with  A Practical Introduction to Docker Containers on the Red Hat Developer Blog.

Continue reading “A Practical Introduction to Container Terminology”


New Release of Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization.

Red Hat is proud to announce the release of JBoss Data Virtualization (JDV) 6.4


JBoss Data Virtualization is a data integration solution that sits in front of multiple data sources and allows them to be treated as a single source, delivering the right data, in the required form, at the right time to any application and/or user.

JDV 6.4 Features

The JBoss Data Virtualization 6.4 release focuses on supporting new and updating existing cloud, big data, and in-memory data sources.

Continue reading “New Release of Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization.”


Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) With Nested KVM


If you are like me, you probably prefer to install new and exploratory software in a fresh virtual machine (VM) or container to insulate your laptop/desktop from software pollution (TM). Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) relies on virtualization to create a Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) virtual machine to run OpenShift (based on Kubernetes). Red Hat specifically supports installation of the CDK on Windows, macOS, and RHEL Server, but if you are running Fedora, RHEL Workstation, or even CentOS, you will run into trouble. If you are not running a supported desktop, you can always use a RHEL Server virtual machine, and this tutorial is for you.

Continue reading “Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) With Nested KVM”