Red Hat Logo

About When Not to Do Microservices

Quick interlude to my last blog. As part of my last blog on low-risk monolith to microservice architecture, I made this statement about microservices and not doing them:

“Microservices architecture is not appropriate all the time”.

I’ve had some interesting reactions. Some of it along the lines of “how dare you”. I also poked at that a bit on Twitter a month or so ago

Don't do microservices

Continue reading “About When Not to Do Microservices”

Share

Jug Summer Camp 2017, Vert.x and collaborative DJ mix

I had the pleasure to present “Eclipse Vert.x for Dj fun and for profit!” at the latest edition of the Jug Summer Camp in La Rochelle, France.

The Jug Summer Camp is a popular developer conference organized by Serli in western France, gathering regional attendees as well as speakers and participants from other French Java user groups.

Continue reading “Jug Summer Camp 2017, Vert.x and collaborative DJ mix”

Share

OpenID Connect Identity Brokering with Red Hat Single Sign-On

Introduction

In this post, I will provide a walk through of how to set up Identity Brokering on an RH-SSO server.

Red Hat Single Sign-On (RH-SSO) provides Web single sign-on and identity federation based on SAML 2.0, OpenID Connect and OAuth 2.0 specifications.

For this tutorial, you will need:

  • An RH-SSO Instance.
  • A Web/Mobile Application with an OpenID Connect adapter.
  • An OpenID Connect Provider Server (Such as Keycloak) to be used as the 3rd Party Identity Provider.

Continue reading “OpenID Connect Identity Brokering with Red Hat Single Sign-On”

Share

JBoss: Developer’s Guide

Modern applications development demands optimized tools and services. Applications must integrate with different systems and share data. Organizations must be able to immediately respond to changing conditions. JBoss Middleware drives enterprise application innovation every day to deliver the best projects and products. Whether you are an experienced enterprise application developer or just getting started, JBoss: Developer’s Guide provides you with the best time to value guide for enterprise application delivery with the JBoss brand, using hands-on coding and lab exercises with real-life business examples. In-depth information is provided for multiple components of the JBoss Middleware ecosystem to guide you through application development, deployment, data storage and access, communication and messaging, and business process optimization.

Continue reading “JBoss: Developer’s Guide”

Share
demo of features

YAML Language Server and the Extension for VS Code

Over at the Openshift and Che land, we deal with YAML files for deploying our applications regularly. Unfortunately, the tooling to support editing of these files was not up to our expectations. As we are also tooling developers, we have decided to take matters at hand and implement a language server for kubernetes syntax. An effort which mostly Josh Pinkney and I have worked on for the last few months. As we have progressed with our implementation, we have realized that limiting the extension to kubernetes was wasted opportunity and we have reorganized the language server for general YAML support but kept the kubernetes syntax support built-in.

Continue reading “YAML Language Server and the Extension for VS Code”

Share

Use Software Collections without Bothering with Alternative Path

Software Collections (SCL) give you the power to build, install, and use multiple versions of software on the same system, without affecting system-wide installed packages. Therefore, the Software Collections packaging technique is used a lot for building stacks for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and CentOS, especially dynamic languages (Python, Ruby, NodeJS) or databases (PostgreSQL, MariaDB, MongoDB).

Continue reading “Use Software Collections without Bothering with Alternative Path”

Share

What is a Socket?

Recently, while reviewing the FAQ, I came across the question “What’s a Socket?” For those who are not familiar, I shall explain.

In brief, a Unix Socket (technically, the correct name is Unix domain socket, UDS) allows communication between two different processes on either the same machine or different machines in client-server application frameworks. To be more precise, it’s a way of communicating among computers using a standard Unix descriptors file.

Continue reading “What is a Socket?”

Share