Containerizing open-vm-tools – Part 1: The Dockerfile and constructing a systemd unit file

While validating OpenShift Container Platform on a VMware platform the usage of Atomic OS was also a requirement. In the initial reference architecture, the decision was made to use Red Hat Enterprise Linux as the platform. This platform was then customized and the same packages as in Atomic were installed via Ansible and Red Hat Network.

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Sprint 2017 GNU Toolchain Update

The GNU Toolchain is a collection of programming tools produced by the GNU Project. The tools are often packaged together due to their common use for developing software applications, operating systems, and low-level software for embedded systems.

This blog is part of a regular series covering the latest changes and improvements in the components that make up this Toolchain.  Apart from the announcement of new releases, however, the features described here are at the bleeding edge of software development in the tools.  This does mean that it may be a while before they make it into production releases, and they might not be fully functional yet.  But anyone who is interested in experimenting with them can build their own copy of the Toolchain and then try them out.

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JBoss participates in Google Summer of Code 2017

Google Summer of Code (GSoC), for those who are not familiar, is an initiative led by Google to encourage students to participate in Open Source projects during their summer break. Projects like JBoss Community, Eclipse Vert.X or Fedora apply to be a mentoring organization and if selected by Google, are paired with students with whom they will mentor. Selected and successful students will receive a stipend from Google for their participation.

The JBoss community has been participating in GSoC for the past several years, with outstanding success, and I am happy to announce that the JBoss community has once again been selected as a mentoring organization for GSoC 2017. I have written about last year’s results in the past.

We have posted a list of ideas for proposals for students, but students are also encouraged to submit their own ideas.

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Basics of Go in Fedora

Why use RPMs (distribution packages in general) at all ?!

Distribution RPMs enables you to get signed curated content, with security updates, bug fixes, general updates, some level of testing, and known ways of reproducing the build locally. Of course, it has its cost mostly in the package size overhead and packaging infrastructure overhead (yum, dnf, apt….).

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Diagnosing Function Pointer Security Flaws with a GCC plugin

A few months ago, I had to write some internal GCC passes to perform static analysis on the GNU C Library (glibc). I figured I might as well write them as plugins since they were unlikely to see the light of day outside of my little sandbox. Being a long time GCC contributor, but having no experience writing plugins I thought it’d be a good way to eat our own dog food, and perhaps write about my experience.

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Naming Matters

Everything around us has a name, I mean everything, otherwise, how would we be able to refer to them, particularly in programming. From our project name, directories, variables, and more, a name must be associated with every item or else we lose their meaning and use.

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