Single Sign-On Made Easy with Keycloak / Red Hat SSO

If you’re looking for a single sign-on solution (SSO) that enables you to secure new or legacy applications and easily use federated identity providers (IdP) such as social networks, you should definitely take a look at Keycloak. Keycloak is the upstream open source community project for Red Hat Single Sign-On (RH-SSO). RH-SSO is a core service that is part of a number of  products such as Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform. If you’ve logged into to or you are using Keycloak.

On the Red Hat Developer blog there have been a number of recent articles that cover various aspects Keycloak/RH-SSO integration.  A recent DevNation Live Tech Talk covered Securing Spring Boot Microservices with Keycloak. This article discusses the features of Keycloak/RH-SSO that you should be aware of.

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Open vSwitch-DPDK: How Much Hugepage Memory?


In order to maximize performance of the Open vSwitch DPDK datapath, it pre-allocates hugepage memory. As a user you are responsible for telling Open vSwitch how much hugepage memory to pre-allocate. The question of exactly what value to use often arises. The answer is, it depends.

There is no simple answer as it depends on things like the MTU size of the ports, the MTU differences between ports, and whether those ports are on the same NUMA node. Just to complicate things a bit more, there are multiple overheads, and alignment and rounding need to be accounted for at various places in OVS-DPDK. Everything clear? OK, you can stop reading then!
However, if not, read on.

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Next DevNation Live: Camel Riders in the Cloud, March 15th, 12pm EDT

The next online DevNation Live Tech Talk will be Thursday, March 15th at 12pm EDT. The topic is Camel Riders in the Cloud presented by Claus Ibsen

Apache Camel has fundamentally changed the way enterprise Java™ developers think about system-to-system integration. It makes it easy to apply enterprise integration patterns (EIP) using simple declarations. The result is a lightweight application that is wrapped and delivered as a single JAR.

In this session, we’ll show you how to apply the best practices from the enterprise integration world to build microservices that are deployed as Linux® containers, running on top of Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift. These integration applications will be both cloud-native and cloud-portable.

Register now and join the live presentation at 12pm EDT, Thursday, March 15th. 

Note: For those outside of the US, daylight savings time started this week, so the US East coast is now UTC – 4.

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What is a KJAR?

Red Hat JBoss® BPM Suite and Red Hat Decision Manager (formerly Red Hat JBoss BRMS) both use an artifact packaging known as a “KJAR”, or knowledge artifact, since version 6. What is this file type? What separates it from a standard JAR file?

The basic summary

In very few words, a KJAR is a standard JAR file that has some extra files included. A KJAR keeps the same .jar extension as a JAR file, because its basic file structure is identical to that of a JAR.

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Eclipse Vert.x logo

Introduction to Eclipse Vert.x – My First Vert.x Application

Let’s say, you heard someone saying that Eclipse Vert.x is awesome. Ok great, but you may want to try it yourself. The next logical question is “where do I start?”. This article is a good starting point. It shows: how to build a very simple Vert.x application (nothing fancy), how it is tested, and how it is packaged and executed. Basically everything you need to know before building your own groundbreaking application.

The code developed in this article is available on GitHub. This is part of the “Introduction to Vert.x Series”. The code for this post is located in the repository in the post-1directory.

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Red Hat Developer Program

Istio Route Rules: Telling Service Requests Where To Go

OpenShift and Kubernetes do a great job of working to make sure calls to your microservice are routed to the correct pods. After all, that’s one of the raison d’être for Kubernetes: routing and load balancing. What if, however, you want to customize the routing? What if you want to run two versions at the same time? How do Istio Route Rules handle this?

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