Modernize your application deployment with Lift and Shift

Modernize your application deployment with Lift and Shift

For many software modernization projects, it’s all about learning to love, lift, and shift. No, wait. It’s all about learning to love lift and shift. The basic idea behind lift and shift is to modernize how an existing application is packaged and deployed. Because it’s not about rewriting the application itself, lift and shift is typically quick to implement.

Modern development environments rely on containers for packaging and deployment. A modern environment also uses a continuous integration / continuous deployment (CI/CD) system that automatically builds, tests, and deploys an application whenever its source code changes.

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Announcing: Thorntail 2.2 General Availability

Announcing: Thorntail 2.2 General Availability

An Introduction to Thorntail

Today Red Hat is making Thorntail 2.2 generally available to Red Hat customers through a subscription to Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR). RHOAR provides application developers with a variety of application runtimes running on the OpenShift Container Platform.

Thorntail is the new name for WildFly Swarm, and bundles everything you need to develop and run Thorntail and MicroProfile applications by packaging server runtime libraries with your application code and running it with java -jar. It speeds up the transition from monoliths to microservices and takes advantage of your existing industry standard Java EE technology experience.

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Deploying MicroProfile apps on Microsoft Azure using the Azure Open Service Broker

Deploying MicroProfile apps on Microsoft Azure using the Azure Open Service Broker

At the recently concluded Microsoft Ignite 2018 conference in Orlando, I had the honor of presenting to a crowd of Java developers and Azure professionals eager to learn how to put their Java skills to work building next-gen apps on Azure. Of course, that meant showcasing the technology coming out of the popular MicroProfile community, in which Red Hat plays a big part (and makes a fully supported, productized MicroProfile implementation through Thorntail, part of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes).

We did a demo too, which is the main topic of this blog post, showing how easy it is to link your Java MicroProfile apps to Azure services through the Open Service Broker for Azure (the open source, Open Service Broker-compatible API server that provisions managed services in the Microsoft Azure public cloud) and OpenShift’s Service Catalog.

Here’s how to reproduce the demo.

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EclipseCon Europe: Che sessions by Red Hatters

EclipseCon Europe: Che sessions by Red Hatters

EclipseCon Europe is almost here, and many Red Hatters are working furiously to make the show as valuable as possible for attendees. (We’re partly doing it for ourselves as well, of course, because it’s a great opportunity to get the entire Che/Theia community together.)  If you aren’t familiar with Eclipse Che, it’s is a next-generation cloud IDE and developer workspace server for teams and organizations. Theia is an extensible open-source framework to develop multi-language IDEs for the cloud and desktop using state-of-the-art web technologies.

The conference will be held next week on October 22–25 in Ludwigsburg, Germany. Here’s a rundown of what will be offered.

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EventFlow: Event-driven microservices on OpenShift (Part 1)

EventFlow: Event-driven microservices on OpenShift (Part 1)

This post is the first in a series of three related posts that describes a lightweight cloud-native distributed microservices framework we have created called EventFlow. EventFlow can be used to develop streaming applications that can process CloudEvents, which are an effort to standardize upon a data format for exchanging information about events generated by cloud platforms.

The EventFlow platform was created to specifically target the Kubernetes/OpenShift platforms, and it models event-processing applications as a connected flow or stream of components. The development of these components can be facilitated through the use of a simple SDK library, or they can be created as Docker images that can be configured using environment variables to attach to Kafka topics and process event data directly.

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Securing .NET Core on OpenShift using HTTPS

Securing .NET Core on OpenShift using HTTPS

In an effort to improve security, browsers have become stricter in warning users about sites that aren’t properly secured with SSL/TLS. ASP.NET Core 2.1 has improved support for HTTPS. You can read more about these enhancements in Improvements to using HTTPS. In this blog post, we’ll look at how you can add HTTPS to your ASP.NET Core applications deployed on Red Hat OpenShift.

Before we get down to business, let’s recap some OpenShift vocabulary and HTTPS fundamentals. If you are familiar, you can skip over these sections.

OpenShift, pods, services, routes, and S2I

OpenShift is a Kubernetes-based open-source container application platform. A Kubernetes pod is a set of containers that must be deployed on the same host. In most cases, a pod consists of a single container. When we run the same application in several pods, a service does the load balancing across those pods. A route makes a service accessible externally via a hostname.

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Use Groovy to customize the Maven build process

Use Groovy to customize the Maven build process

Apache Maven is a popular build automation tool used primarily for Java projects (although it can also be used to build and manage projects written in other languages). Maven uses a pom.xml file to centrally manage a project’s build and its dependencies. If you have worked anywhere near to the Java ecosystem chances are that, for the good or for the bad, you have come across the use of this tool.

Maven plugins are used to enhance and customize the Maven build process; while the list of existing plugins is quite extensive, it is common to need to implement some small changes or tweak the build just a bit, which makes writing a whole plugin feel like overkill.

This post describes a possible solution: the GMaven Plus plugin.

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Red Hat Container Development Kit 3.6 now available

Red Hat Container Development Kit 3.6 now available

We are pleased to announce the availability of Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) 3.6. CDK 3.6 is based on Minishift 1.24.0, a command-line tool to quickly provision an OpenShift and Kubernetes cluster on your local machine for developing cloud- and container-based applications. You can run CDK/Minishift on Windows, macOS, or Linux.

Today, we are also announcing the availability of Red Hat Developer Studio 12.9 and JBoss Tools 4.9 for Eclipse 2018-09. You can develop cloud/container-based applications with a familiar desktop IDE that has integrated tooling for CDK/Minishift.

Here’s a summary of the new features in CDK 3.6:

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Announcing Red Hat Developer Studio 12.9.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.9.0.Final for Eclipse 2018-09

Announcing Red Hat Developer Studio 12.9.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.9.0.Final for Eclipse 2018-09

Attention desktop IDE users: Red Hat Developer Studio 12.9 and the community edition, JBoss Tools 4.9.0 for Eclipse 2018-09, are now available. You can download the Developer Studio bundled installer, which installs Eclipse 4.9 with all of the JBoss Tools already configured. Or, if you have an existing Eclipse 4.9 (2018-09) installation, you can download the JBoss Tools package.

This article highlights some of the new features in both JBoss Tools and Eclipse Photon, covering WildFly, Spring Boot, Camel, Maven, and many Java-related improvements—including full Java 11 support.

Developer Studio/JBoss Tools provides a desktop IDE with a broad set of tooling covering multiple programming models and frameworks. If you are doing container/cloud development, there is integrated functionality for working with Red Hat OpenShift, Kubernetes, Red Hat Container Development Kit, and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes. For integration projects, there is tooling covering Camel and Red Hat Fuse that can be used in both local and cloud deployments.

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Integrating third-party identity providers with Red Hat 3scale API Management

Integrating third-party identity providers with Red Hat 3scale API Management

This post describes how to configure OpenID Connect (OIDC) authentication using an external Identity Provider (IdP). With the new release of Red Hat 3scale API Management, version 2.3, it is possible to use any OIDC-compliant IdP during the API authentication phase. This is a very important new feature because it makes it possible to integrate any IdP already present in your environment—without having to use an Identity Broker—thus reducing overall complexity.

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