DevNation Live: Plumbing Kubernetes builds | Deploy with Tekton

DevNation Live: Plumbing Kubernetes builds | Deploy with Tekton

DevNation Live tech talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions and code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about Tekton, a Kubernetes-native way of defining and running CI/CD,  from Kamesh Sampath, Principal Software Engineer at Red Hat.

Continue reading “DevNation Live: Plumbing Kubernetes builds | Deploy with Tekton”

Share
Manipulating emojis in Java, or: What is 🐻 + 1?

Manipulating emojis in Java, or: What is 🐻 + 1?

Warning: The code you’re about to see has no redeeming qualities whatsoever. We hope you enjoy it as much as we do. 

If you’re like us, you’ve probably been wondering about how to manipulate emojis in your Java programs. Or perhaps you’ve been thinking about that age-old question, “What is 🐻 + 1?” Thanks to a recent coding session in which yr author spent what could have been several productive hours going down a 🐰🕳(rabbit hole), we can help you answer that question.

Continue reading “Manipulating emojis in Java, or: What is 🐻 + 1?”

Share
How to use Dekorate to create Kubernetes manifests

How to use Dekorate to create Kubernetes manifests

“Write once, run everywhere” is a slogan created by Sun Microsystems to illustrate the cross-platform benefits of Java. In the cloud-native world, this slogan is more accurate than ever, with virtualization and containers increasing the distance between code and hardware even further. But what does this shift mean for developers?

Developers need to take care of containerizing their application and also provide a set of manifests for Kubernetes (which now tends to be a synonym of cloud). In this article, we are going to focus on the latter and, more specifically, on how to use Dekorate to create and maintain these manifests with the minimum possible effort.

Continue reading “How to use Dekorate to create Kubernetes manifests”

Share
Best practices for running Buildah in a container

Best practices for running Buildah in a container

One of the cool things about separating the container runtimes into different tools is that you can start to combine them to help secure one other.

Lots of people would like to build OCI/container images within a system like Kubernetes. Imagine you have a CI/CD system that is constantly building container images, a tool like Red Hat OpenShift/Kubernetes would be useful for distributing the load of builds. Until recently, most people were leaking the Docker socket into the container and then allowing the containers to do docker build. As I pointed out years ago, this is one of the most dangerous things you can do.  Giving people root access on the system or sudo without requiring a password is more secure than allowing access to the Docker socket.

Because of this, many people have been attempting to run Buildah within a container. We have been watching and answering questions on this for a while. We have built an example of what we think is the best way to run Buildah inside of a container and have made these container images public at quay.io/buildah.

Continue reading “Best practices for running Buildah in a container”

Share
Introduction to odo interactive mode for OpenShift development

Introduction to odo interactive mode for OpenShift development

If you’re familiar with OpenShift Do (odo), a developer-focused command-line tool for Red Hat OpenShift, then you know that one of its primary goals is to make it easier to do fast, iterative development. Even experienced odo users, however, may not be familiar with odo’s interactive mode, which simplifies the process of creating components and services even further.

Continue reading “Introduction to odo interactive mode for OpenShift development”

Share
Red Hat technologies make open hybrid cloud a reality

Red Hat technologies make open hybrid cloud a reality

Lots of organizations worldwide have the goal of an open hybrid cloud. The ability to build applications that work with multiple public cloud providers as well as on-premise virtualization services without vendor lock-in has many advantages:

  • The ability to move workloads from one cloud provider to another.
  • The freedom to move workloads in-house and off-premises as needed.
  • The ability to coordinate tasks running in different clouds.

For a definition of open hybrid cloud, we turn to Red Hat’s Eric Schabell:

Hybrid cloud is a combination of one or more public and private clouds with at least a degree of workload portability, integration, orchestration, and unified management.

Continue reading “Red Hat technologies make open hybrid cloud a reality”

Share
Efficient string copying and concatenation in C

Efficient string copying and concatenation in C

Among the most heavily used string handling functions declared in the standard C <string.h> header are those that copy and concatenate strings. Both sets of functions copy characters from one object to another, and both return their first argument: a pointer to the beginning of the destination object. The choice of the return value is a source of inefficiency that is the subject of this article.

The code examples shown in this article are for illustration only. They should not be viewed as recommended practice and may contain subtle bugs.

Continue reading “Efficient string copying and concatenation in C”

Share
4 command-line tools for Kubernetes: Linux edition

4 command-line tools for Kubernetes: Linux edition

In a previous blog post, I detailed how to install four very useful Kubernetes tools on your macOS or Windows machine. Those tools—kubectl, stern, kubectx, and kubens—are must-haves for the advancing developer, as well as any folks in operations. What I failed to do previously, however, was include instructions for installing these tools on Linux. So… here we are.

Continue reading “4 command-line tools for Kubernetes: Linux edition”

Share