Jakarta EE: Creating an Enterprise JavaBeans timer

Jakarta EE: Creating an Enterprise JavaBeans timer

Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) has many interesting and useful features, some of which I will be highlighting in this and upcoming articles. In this article, I’ll show you how to create an EJB timer programmatically and with annotation. Let’s go!

The EJB timer feature allows us to schedule tasks to be executed according a calendar configuration. It is very useful because we can execute scheduled tasks using the power of Jakarta context. When we run tasks based on a timer, we need to answer some questions about concurrency, which node the task was scheduled on (in case of an application in a cluster), what is the action if the task does not execute, and others. When we use the EJB timer we can delegate many of these concerns to Jakarta context and care more about business logic. It is interesting, isn’t it?

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We’re headed for edge computing

We’re headed for edge computing

Every week seems to bring a new report on how edge computing is going to take over the world. This crescendo has been building for the past few years, so it’s no surprise that edge computing sits near the peak on the Gartner hype cycle for emerging technologies. But the question remains—will the edge computing phenomenon take over the world as predicted and, if so, how can businesses benefit from it?

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Future-proof monolithic applications with modular design

Future-proof monolithic applications with modular design

DevNation tech talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions and code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about future-proofing applications from Eric Murphy and Ales Nosek, Architects with Red Hat Consulting.

When building an MVP software application, you may immediately jump to a microservices architecture because it’s the new norm for building cloud-native applications. You may also be skeptical about starting off with a monolith because of the perception of such applications as relics of the past.

In this talk, we will show how to evolve a monolithic application in a highly controlled way using modular design principles. We will also demonstrate a future-proofed Quarkus + Vert.x application that is both a monolith and microservices while using the same code and modular design.

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MicroProfile 3.2 is now available on Open Liberty in Red Hat Runtimes

MicroProfile 3.2 is now available on Open Liberty in Red Hat Runtimes

Open Liberty 19.0.0.12 provides support for MicroProfile 3.2, allowing users to provide their own health check procedures and monitor microservice applications easily with metrics. Additionally, updates allow trust to be established using the JDK’s default truststore or a certificate through an environment variable.

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Keycloak: Core concepts of open source identity and access management

Keycloak: Core concepts of open source identity and access management

Keycloak provides the flexibility to export and import configurations easily, using a single view to manage everything. Together, these technologies let you integrate front-end, mobile, and monolithic applications into a microservice architecture. In this article, we discuss the core concepts and features of Keycloak and its application integration mechanisms. You will find links to implementation details near the end.

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LoRaWAN setup at the EclipseCon IoT playground

LoRaWAN setup at the EclipseCon IoT playground

At the recent EclipseCon Europe in Ludwigsburg, Germany, we had a big dashboard in the IoT playground area showing graphs of the number of WiFi devices, the temperature, and air quality, all transmitted via LoRaWAN. We worked on this project during the community day and kept the setup throughout the conference, where we showed it and played with it even further. This article describes the architecture of the setup and gives pointers to replicate it.

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CodeReady Workspaces devfile, demystified

CodeReady Workspaces devfile, demystified

With the exciting advent of CodeReady Workspaces (CRW) 2.0 comes some important changes. Based on the upstream project Eclipse Che 7, CRW brings even more of the “Infrastructure as Code” idea to fruition. Workspaces mimic the environment of a PC, an operating system, programming language support, the tools needed, and an editor. The real power comes by defining a workspace using a YAML file—a text file that can be stored and versioned in a source control system such as Git. This file, called devfile.yaml, is powerful and complex. This article will attempt to demystify the devfile.

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Building freely distributed containers with Podman and Red Hat UBI

Building freely distributed containers with Podman and Red Hat UBI

DevNation tech talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions and code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about building containers with Podman and Red Hat Universal Base Image (UBI) from Scott McCarty and Burr Sutter.

We will cover how to build and run containers based on UBI using just your regular user account—no daemon, no root, no fuss. Finally, we will order the de-resolution of all of our containers with a really cool command. After this talk, you will have new tools at the ready to help you find, run, build, and share container images.

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Understanding Red Hat AMQ Streams components for OpenShift and Kubernetes: Part 3

Understanding Red Hat AMQ Streams components for OpenShift and Kubernetes: Part 3

In the previous articles in this series, we first covered the basics of Red Hat AMQ Streams on OpenShift and then showed how to set up Kafka Connect, a Kafka Bridge, and Kafka Mirror Maker. Here are a few key points to keep in mind before we proceed:

  • AMQ Streams is based on Apache Kafka.
  • AMQ Streams for the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform is based on the Strimzi project.
  • AMQ Streams on containers has multiple components, such as the Cluster Operator, Entity Operator, Mirror Maker, Kafka connect, and Kafka Bridge.

Now that we have everything set up (or so we think), let’s look at monitoring and alerting for our new environment.

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Introduction to the Red Hat OpenShift deployment extension for Microsoft Azure DevOps

Introduction to the Red Hat OpenShift deployment extension for Microsoft Azure DevOps

We are extremely pleased to present the new version of the Red Hat OpenShift deployment extension (OpenShift VSTS) 1.4.0 for Microsoft Azure DevOps. This extension enables users to deploy their applications to any OpenShift cluster directly from their Microsoft Azure DevOps account. In this article, we will look at how to install and use this extension as part of a YAML-defined pipeline with both Microsoft-hosted and self-hosted agents.

Note: The OpenShift VSTS extension can be downloaded directly from the marketplace at this link.

This article offers a demonstration where we explain how easy it is to set up everything and start working with the extension. Look at the README file for further installation and usage information.

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