Node.js

Node.js for Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes wins a Devie award

Node.js for Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes wins a Devie award

For the past year and a half or so, Red Hat Middleware has provided a supported Node.js runtime on OpenShift as part of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR). Our goal has been to provide rapid releases within a week or two of the upstream Node.js core project, booster applications to get developers up and running quickly, and, of course, provide world-class service and support for customers.

This past week at the DeveloperWeek 2019 conference in San Francisco, that focus and dedication paid off as Red Hat was awarded a “Devie” award in the category of “Code Frameworks and Libraries.” I couldn’t have been more thrilled to accept the award on behalf of our team.

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Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 3 — Openshift as a development environment

Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 3 — Openshift as a development environment

Welcome back to the final part of this multipart series about deploying modern web applications on Red Hat OpenShift. In the first post, we took a look at how to deploy a modern web application using the fewest commands.

In the second part, we took a deeper look into how the new source-to-image (S2I) web app builder works and how to use it as part of a chained build.

This third and final part will take a look at how you can run your app’s “development workflow” on OpenShift.

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Building a Node.js service using the API-first approach

Building a Node.js service using the API-first approach

Nowadays technology companies are adopting the API as one of the most valuable pieces of their business.

What does it mean when we talk about API-first development? We already know the benefits of using an API-first approach:

  • Reduced interdependencies
  • Earlier validation
  • Early feedback with the freedom to change
  • Improved efficiency

This article describes what it means to use the API-first design approach. It also walks through an example of using this approach with the OpenAPI Specification and with oas-tools as the Node.js back-end application, which enables you to care only about the business logic. All the validation of incoming requests are done by the oas-tools library (based on the OpenAPI Specification file provided).

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Monitoring Node.js Applications on OpenShift with Prometheus

Monitoring Node.js Applications on OpenShift with Prometheus

Observability is Key

One of the great things about Node.js is how well it performs in a container. Its fast start up time, and relatively small size make it a favorite for microservice applications on OpenShift. But with this shift to containerized deployments comes some complexity. As a result, monitoring Node.js applications can be difficult. At times it seems as though the performance and behavior of our applications become opaque to us. So what can we do to find and address issues in our services before they become a problem? We need to enhance observability by monitoring the state of our services.

Instrumentation

Instrumentation of our applications is one way to increase observability. Therefore, in this article, I will demonstrate the instrumentation of a Node.js application using Prometheus.

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PHP 7.2, Node.js 10, NGINX 1.14 and others now GA for RHEL

We are pleased to announce general availability Red Hat Software Collections 3.2, which adds these components to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7:

  • PHP 7.2
  • Varnish Cache 6.0
  • MySQL 8.0
  • NGINX 1.14
  • Node.js 10
  • Git 2.18
  • Update of Apache HTTP server 2.4

These versions are available on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 (Devtools or RHSCL channel) for x86_64, s390x, aarch64, and ppc64le.  Read more details about each component in the “New Components details” section.

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Newest PHP, Varnish Cache, MySQL, NGINX, Node.js, and Git now in beta

Newest PHP, Varnish Cache, MySQL, NGINX, Node.js, and Git now in beta

We are pleased to announce the immediate availability Red Hat Software Collections 3.2 beta, which adds these components to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7:

  • PHP 7.2
  • Varnish Cache 6.0
  • MySQL 8.0
  • NGINX 1.14
  • Node.js 10
  • Git 2.18
  • Update of Apache HTTP server 2.4

These beta versions are available on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 (Devtools or RHSCL channel) for x86_64, s390x, aarch64, and ppc64le.  Read more details about each component in the “New Components details” section.

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Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 2 — Using chained builds

Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 2 — Using chained builds

In the previous article, we took a quick look at a new source-to-image (S2I) builder image designed for building and deploying modern web applications on OpenShift. While the last article was focused on getting your app deployed quickly, this article will look at how to use the S2I image as a “pure” builder image and combine it with an OpenShift chained build.

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Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 1 — Web apps in two commands

Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 1 — Web apps in two commands

In this multi-part series, we will take a look at how to deploy modern web applications, like React and Angular apps, to Red Hat OpenShift using a new source-to-image (S2I) builder image.

Series overview:

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Building Container-Native Node.js Applications with Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes and Istio

Building Container-Native Node.js Applications with Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes and Istio

For developers working on a Kubernetes-based application environment such as Red Hat OpenShift, there are a number things that need to be considered to fully take advantage of the significant benefits provided by these technologies, including:

  • How do I communicate with the orchestration layer to indicate the application is operating correctly and is available to receive traffic?
  • What happens if the application detects a system fault, and how does the application relay this to the orchestration layer?
  • How can I accurately trace traffic flow between my applications in order to identify potential bottlenecks?
  • What tools can I use to easily deploy my updated application as part of my standard toolchain?
  • What happens if I introduce a network fault between my services, and how do I test this scenario?

These questions are central to building container-native solutions. At Red Hat, we define container-native as applications that conform to the following key tenets:

  • DevOps automation
  • Single concern principle
  • Service discovery
  • High observability
  • Lifecycle conformance
  • Runtime confinement
  • Process disposability
  • Image immutability

This may seem like a lot of overhead on top of the core application logic. Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR) and Istio provide developers with tools to adhere to these principles with minimal overhead in terms of coding and implementation.

In this blog post, we’re specifically focusing on how RHOAR and Istio combine to provide tools for DevOps automation, lifecycle conformance, high observability, and runtime confinement.

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How to Debug Your Node.js Application on OpenShift with Chrome DevTools

How to Debug Your Node.js Application on OpenShift with Chrome DevTools

Recently, I wrote a post called Zero to Express on OpenShift in Three Commands, which shows how to get started using Node.js, Express, and OpenShift together as fast as possible using the Node.js s2i (source-to-image) images that were recently released as part of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR).

This post will add to the last one and show how we can start to debug and inspect our running code using the Chrome Developer Tools (DevTools) inspector.

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