Quickly set up a LAMP stack on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8

Have you tried Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 (RHEL8) yet? Read on to learn how to quickly set up a LAMP stack on RHEL8 so you can play around with the new features built into the operating system.

A LAMP stack is made up of four main components and some glue. The first main component in a LAMP stack (the “L”) is Linux. In my example, I’m using Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 for that, which gives me a secure operating system, a modern programming environment, and a user-friendly set of tools to control it.

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Introduction to cloud-native application environment architecture

Cloud-native environment architecture can be challenging to understand. To help make sense of it for application developers and software/system architects,  I will attempt to explain the various parts and how they work together. Toward this end, I find it helpful to think about the architecture in four separate layers: application software development, service scaling, application network, and container orchestration platform.

In this article, I will describe the first technology layer: application software development. I drew the following diagram to make these concepts easier to visualize.

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Using Quay.io to find vulnerabilities in your container images

You’ve created a container image that has all the packages that you and your team need to do something useful, or maybe you’ve built a public image that anybody can use. But, what if that image contains packages with known security vulnerabilities? Regardless of the severity of those vulnerabilities, you’ll want to learn more and take steps to mitigate them as soon as possible.

Fortunately, your team uses Quay.io* as your registry. When you push an image to Quay.io, it automatically runs a security scan against that image.

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Go and FIPS 140-2 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Red Hat provides the Go programming language to Red Hat Enterprise Linux customers via the go-toolset package. If this package is new to you, and you want to learn more, check out some of the previous articles that have been written for some background.

The go-toolset package is currently shipping Go version 1.11.x, with Red Hat planning to ship 1.12.x in Fall 2019. Currently, the go-toolset package only provides the Go toolchain (e.g., the compiler and associated tools like gofmt); however, we are looking into adding other tools to provide a more complete and full-featured Go development environment.

In this article, I will talk about some of the improvements, changes, and exciting new features for go-toolset that we have been working on. These changes bring many upstream improvements and CVE fixes, as well as new features that we have been developing internally alongside upstream.

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Virtual event: Conquer complexity with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8

Since the general release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, we’ve had great response from those of you who have downloaded the product and used our complimentary RHEL 8 resources. RHEL 8 is the most developer-friendly version ever, but you may still have questions.

Join us on June 18 for our comprehensive virtual event: Conquer complexity with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8. In this event, experts John Gantz, Senior Vice President, IDC, and Ron Pacheco, Director, Product Management Global, Red Hat, will explain what RHEL 8 can do for your organization.

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Accessing Apache Kafka in Strimzi: Part 5 – Ingress

In the fifth and final part of this series, we will look at exposing Apache Kafka in Strimzi using Kubernetes Ingress. This article will explain how to use Ingress controllers on Kubernetes, how Ingress compares with Red Hat OpenShift routes, and how it can be used with Strimzi and Kafka. Off-cluster access using Kubernetes Ingress is available only from Strimzi 0.12.0. (Links to previous articles in the series can be found at the end.)

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Application lifecycle management for container-native development

Container-native development is primarily about consistency, flexibility, and scalability. Legacy Application Lifecycle Management (ALM) tooling often is not, leading to situations where it:

  • Places artificial barriers on development speed, and therefore time to value,
  • Creates single points of failure in the infrastructure, and
  • Stifles innovation through inflexibility.

Ultimately, developers are expensive, but they are the domain experts in what they build. With development teams often being treated as product teams (who own the entire lifecycle and support of their applications), it becomes imperative that they control the end-to-end process on which they rely to deliver their applications into production. This means decentralizing both the ALM process and the tooling that supports that process. In this article, we’ll explore this approach and look at a couple of implementation scenarios.

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Accessing Apache Kafka in Strimzi: Part 3 – Red Hat OpenShift routes

In the third part of this article series (see links to previous articles below), we will look at how Strimzi exposes Apache Kafka using Red Hat OpenShift routes. This article will explain how routes work and how they can be used with Apache Kafka. Routes are available only on OpenShift, but if you are a Kubernetes user, don’t be sad; a forthcoming article in this series will discuss using Kubernetes Ingress, which is similar to OpenShift routes.

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Accessing Apache Kafka in Strimzi: Part 2 – Node ports

This article series explains how Apache Kafka and its clients work and how Strimzi makes it accessible for clients running outside of Kubernetes. In the first article, we provided an introduction to the topic, and here we will look at exposing an Apache Kafka cluster managed by Strimzi using node ports.

Specifically, in this article, we’ll look at how node ports work and how they can be used with Kafka. We also will cover the different configuration options available to users and the pros and cons of using node ports.

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