Kubernetes

Deploying the Mosquitto MQTT message broker on Red Hat OpenShift, Part 1

Deploying the Mosquitto MQTT message broker on Red Hat OpenShift, Part 1

Mosquitto is a lightweight message broker that supports the Message Queuing Telemetry Transport  (MQTT) protocol. Mosquitto is widely used in Internet of Things (IoT) and telemetry applications, where a fully-featured message broker like Red Hat AMQ would be unnecessarily burdensome. Mosquitto also finds a role as a message bus for interprocess communication in distributed systems. Because it avoids complex features, Mosquitto is easy to tune and handles substantial application workloads with relatively modest memory and CPU resources.

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Containerize .NET for Red Hat OpenShift: Linux containers and .NET Core

Containerize .NET for Red Hat OpenShift: Linux containers and .NET Core

When .NET was released to the open source world (November 12, 2014—not that I remember the date or anything), it didn’t just bring .NET to open source; it brought open source to .NET. Linux containers were one of the then-burgeoning, now-thriving technologies that became available to .NET developers. At that time, it was “docker, docker, docker” all the time. Now, it’s Podman and Buildah, and Kubernetes, and Red Hat OpenShift, and serverless, and … well, you get the idea. Things have progressed, and your .NET applications can progress, as well.

This article is part of a series introducing three ways to containerize .NET applications on Red Hat OpenShift. I’ll start with a high-level overview of Linux containers and .NET Core, then discuss a couple of ways to build and containerize .NET Core applications and deploy them on OpenShift.

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Using a custom devfile registry and C++ with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces

Using a custom devfile registry and C++ with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces

Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces provides teams with predefined workspaces to streamline application development. Out of the box, CodeReady Workspaces supports numerous languages and plugins. However, many organizations want to customize a workspace and make it available to developers across the organization as a standard. In this article, I show you how to use a custom devfile registry to customize a workspace for C++ development. Once that’s done, we will deploy an example application using Docker.

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Containerize and deploy Strapi applications on Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift

Containerize and deploy Strapi applications on Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift

Strapi is the leading open-source headless content management system (CMS). It’s 100% JavaScript, fully customizable, and takes a developer-first approach. Strapi provides you with an interface to create and manage all the resources for your website. You can then build a front end to connect to your Strapi API with your favorite tools and frameworks. Content editors can use the friendly administration panel to manage and distribute content. Strapi is also based on a plugin system, which makes the CMS flexible and extensible.

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Build even faster Quarkus applications with fast-jar

Build even faster Quarkus applications with fast-jar

Quarkus is already fast, but what if you could make inner loop development with the supersonic, subatomic Java framework even faster? Quarkus 1.5 introduced fast-jar, a new packaging format that supports faster startup times. Starting in Quarkus 1.12, this great feature became the default packaging format for Quarkus applications. This article introduces you to the fast-jar format and how it works.

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