Kubernetes

How to use the VS Code Tekton Pipelines extension

How to use the VS Code Tekton Pipelines extension

The Tekton Project, which was announced in March after branching off from the Knative project, is creating excitement as a Kubernetes-native CI/CD pipeline tool.

Tekton offers the flexibility and agnosticism that Kubernetes is celebrated for and is positioned to become the first open standardized engine for executing pipelines. Although the project is still in the early stages of development, we couldn’t wait to start making it easier for developers to jump on the Tekton train. In this article, we’ll take a quick look at the Tekton Pipelines extension and how to use it.

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The new Tekton Pipelines extension for Visual Studio Code

The new Tekton Pipelines extension for Visual Studio Code

The Tekton Project, which was announced in March after branching off from the Knative project, is creating excitement as a Kubernetes-native CI/CD pipeline tool.

It offers the flexibility and agnosticism that Kubernetes is celebrated for and is positioned to become the first open standardized engine for executing pipelines. Although the project is still in the early stages of development, we couldn’t wait to start making it easier for developers to jump on the Tekton train. Therefore in this article, we’ll take a quick look at the Tekton Pipelines extension and how to use it.

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Skupper.io: Let your services communicate across Kubernetes clusters

Skupper.io: Let your services communicate across Kubernetes clusters

In the past few years, the popularity and adoption of containers has skyrocketed, and the Kubernetes container orchestration platform has been largely adopted as well. With these changes, a new set of challenges has emerged when dealing with applications deployed on Kubernetes clusters in the real world. One challenge is how to deal with communication between multiple clusters that might be in different networks (even private ones), behind firewalls, and so on.

One possible solution to this problem is to use a Virtual Application Network (VAN), which is sometimes referred to as a Layer 7 network. In a nutshell, a VAN is a logical network that is deployed at the application level and introduces a new layer of addressing for fine-grained application components with no constraints on the network topology. For a much more in-depth explanation, please read this excellent article.

So, what is Skupper? In the project’s own words:

Skupper is a layer seven service interconnect. It enables secure communication across Kubernetes clusters with no VPNs or special firewall rules.

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Cloud-native integration with Kubernetes and Camel K

Cloud-native integration with Kubernetes and Camel K

Our first DevNation Live regional event was held in Bengaluru, India in July. This free technology event focused on open source innovations, with sessions presented by elite Red Hat technologists.

In this session, Kamesh Sampath shows how to apply common Enterprise Integration Patterns (EIP) with Apache Camel, Kubernetes, and Red Hat OpenShift. You will see how the new Camel K framework helps in deploying Camel DSL code as “integrations” in Kubernetes/OpenShift.

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Tracing Kubernetes applications with Jaeger and Eclipse Che

Tracing Kubernetes applications with Jaeger and Eclipse Che

Developing distributed applications is complicated. You can wait to monitor for performance issues once you launch the application on your test or staging servers, or in production if you’re feeling lucky, but why not track performance as you develop? This allows you to identify improvement opportunities before rolling out changes to a test or production environment. This article demonstrates how two tools can work together to integrate performance monitoring into your development environment: Eclipse Che and Jaeger.

According to the Eclipse Che website:

“Che brings your Kubernetes application into your development environment and provides an in-browser IDE, allowing you to code, build, test, and run applications exactly as they run on production from any machine.”

In this article, we show how simple it is to add Jaeger to your Eclipse Che development workspace and observe how your Kubernetes application performs. We will use che.openshift.io as the hosting environment, although you could set up a local Che server if you prefer.

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Pod Lifecycle Event Generator: Understanding the “PLEG is not healthy” issue in Kubernetes

Pod Lifecycle Event Generator: Understanding the “PLEG is not healthy” issue in Kubernetes

In this article, I’ll explore the “PLEG is not healthy” issue in Kubernetes, which sometimes leads to a “NodeNotReady” status. When understanding how the Pod Lifecycle Event Generator (PLEG) works, it is helpful to also understand troubleshooting around this issue.

What is PLEG?

The PLEG module in kubelet (Kubernetes) adjusts the container runtime state with each matched pod-level event and keeps the pod cache up to date by applying changes.

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Plumbing Kubernetes CI/CD with Tekton

Plumbing Kubernetes CI/CD with Tekton

Our first DevNation Live regional event was held in Bengaluru, India in July. This free technology event focused on open source innovations, with sessions presented by elite Red Hat technologists.

In this session, Kamesh Sampath introduces Tekton, which is the Kubernetes-native way of defining and running CI/CD. Sampath explores the characteristics of Tekton—cloud-native, decoupled, and declarative—and shows how to combine various building blocks of Tekton to build and deploy a cloud-native application.

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Get hands-on experience with Kubernetes and Quarkus at DevNation Live in Austin

Get hands-on experience with Kubernetes and Quarkus at DevNation Live in Austin

Join us December 12, 2019 for this free, one-day, two-track event at the Hilton Austin with Red Hat experts.

The cloud is dramatically changing established development practices, and developers need expert training and hands-on experience to stay up to date.

Join Red Hat’s developer advocates (including Burr Sutter, Edson Yanaga, and Kamesth Sampath) in Austin, Texas for a day of technical sessions, conversation, and hands-on workshops focused on Kubernetes development and Java microservices. Whether you are a Java developer or work in Node.js, C#, Ruby, or Python, you will gain a strong understanding of how to use modern architecture, new patterns, and DevOps to make the most of your work in the cloud.

Register now

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Tour of the Developer Perspective in the Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 web console

Tour of the Developer Perspective in the Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 web console

Of all of the new features of the Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 release, what I’ve been looking forward to the most are the developer-focused updates to the web console. If you’ve used OpenShift 4.1, then you’re probably already familiar with the updated Administrator Perspective, which is where you can manage workloads, storage, networking, cluster settings, and more.

The addition of the new Developer Perspective aims to give developers an optimized experience with the features and workflows they’re most likely to need to be productive. Developers can focus on higher level abstractions like their application and components, and then drill down deeper to get to the OpenShift and Kubernetes resources that make up their application.

Let’s take a tour of the Developer Perspective and explore some of the key features.

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