Kubernetes

Containers, Kubernetes, and microservices: Start here

Containers, Kubernetes, and microservices: Start here

Although containers and Kubernetes and microservices seem to come up in every conversation, there’s a big chasm between talking about, demonstrating, and actually using a technology in production. Anyone can discuss containers, many people can demo them, but far fewer are successfully using containers and Kubernetes in a microservices architecture.

Why? There are likely many reasons, but a simple one may be that developers don’t know where to start.

Consider this series of articles your starting point. Relax, read on, and get ready to enter the exciting world of containers, Kubernetes, and microservices.

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Init Container Build Pattern: Knative build with plain old Kubernetes deployment

Init Container Build Pattern: Knative build with plain old Kubernetes deployment

With Kubernetes evolving at supersonic speed and seeing a lot of adoption in the enterprise world, the developer community is now looking for solutions to common Kubernetes problems, such as patterns. In this article, I will explore a new Kubernetes pattern using Init Containers.

Let’s start with the use case that gave birth to this problem: Quarkus—Supersonic and Subatomic Java—has excited the Java developer community with its amazing speed and all new native build artifact for Java applications. As one of those excited developers, I want to quickly build and deploy a Quarkus application on to Kubernetes.

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Distributed microservices architecture: Istio, managed API gateways and, enterprise integration

Distributed microservices architecture: Istio, managed API gateways and, enterprise integration

The rise of microservices architectures drastically changed the software development landscape. In the past few years, we have seen a shift from centralized monoliths to distributed computing that benefits from cloud infrastructure. With distributed deployments, the adoption of microservices, and system scaling to cloud levels, new problems emerged, as well as new components that tried to solve the problems.

By now, you most likely have heard that the service mesh or Istio is here to save the day. However, you might be wondering how it fits with your current enterprise integration investments and API management initiatives. That is what I discuss in this article.

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Introducing Quarkus: a next-generation Kubernetes native Java framework

Introducing Quarkus: a next-generation Kubernetes native Java framework

Java was introduced to the open-source community over twenty years ago and to this day, it still remains very popular among developers. In fact, it has never ranked lower than #2 on the TIOBE Index. Java was born in the mid-90s and has nearly twenty years of optimizations for running highly dynamic monolithic applications that assumed sole ownership of (virtualized) host CPU and memory. However, we now live in a world dominated by the cloud, mobile, IoT, and open source, where containers, Kubernetes, microservices, reactive, Function-as-a-Service (FaaS), 12-factor, and cloud-native application development can deliver higher levels of productivity and efficiency. As an industry, we need to rethink how Java can be best utilized to address these new deployment environments and application architectures.

We’d like to introduce you to Quarkus and Supersonic Subatomic Java!

Quarkus is a Kubernetes Native Java framework tailored for GraalVM and HotSpot, crafted from best-of-breed Java libraries and standards. The goal of Quarkus is to make Java a leading platform in Kubernetes and serverless environments while offering developers a unified reactive and imperative programming model to optimally address a wider range of distributed application architectures.

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Using sidecars to analyze and debug network traffic in OpenShift and Kubernetes pods

Using sidecars to analyze and debug network traffic in OpenShift and Kubernetes pods

In the world of distributed computing, containers, and microservices, a lot of the interactions and communication between services is done via RESTful APIs. While developing these APIs and interactions between services, I often have the need to debug the communication between services, especially when things don’t seem to work as expected.

Before the world of containers, I would simply deploy my services on my local machine, start up Wireshark, execute my tests, and analyze the HTTP communication between my services. This for me has always been an easy and effective way to quickly analyze communication problems in my software. However, this method of debugging does not work well in a containerized world.

First of all, the containers most likely run on an internal container platform network that is not directly accessible by your machine. A second problem is that, in compliance with container design best practices, containers contain only the minimal set of applications and libraries needed to execute their task. This means that a tool like tcpdump is usually not available in a container. This makes debugging and analyzing network traffic between containers and, thus, debugging of inter-microservice communication a bit harder than in the non-containerized world. This article shows one solution.

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Podman and Buildah for Docker users

Podman and Buildah for Docker users

I was asked recently on Twitter to better explain Podman and Buildah for someone familiar with Docker.  Though there are many blogs and tutorials out there, which I will list later, we in the community have not centralized an explanation of how Docker users move from Docker to Podman and Buildah.  Also what role does Buildah play? Is Podman deficient in some way that we need both Podman and Buildah to replace Docker?

This article answers those questions and shows how to migrate to Podman.

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Creating a containerized Python/Flask development environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces

Creating a containerized Python/Flask development environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces

Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces provide developers with containerized development environments hosted on OpenShift/Kubernetes. DevOps teams can now use a hosted development environment that’s pre-built for their chosen stack and customized for their project.

CodeReady Workspaces can help you rapidly onboard developers for your project as everything they need to develop is running in a containerized workspace. In this post, we’re going to use CodeReady Workspaces to get up and running quickly with an existing open source project, Peak. Peak is a multi-container Kubernetes application for performance testing web services, and it allows you to create distributed performance tests using the Kubernetes Batch API for test orchestration. We’ll make some modifications to Peak’s Flask front end, a stateless web interface that interacts with a Falcon RESTful API to return data about performance tests. You won’t need the complete Peak application deployed, though if you like, you can find steps to deploy it to OpenShift here.

To follow along you’ll need a Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 3.11 environment. You can use the Red Hat Container Development Kit on your Windows, macOS, or Linux laptop or a hosted Red Hat OpenShift instance to do it on online.

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Announcing Kubernetes-native self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online

Announcing Kubernetes-native self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online

Microservices architecture is taking over software development discussions everywhere. More and more companies are adapting to develop microservices as the core of their new systems. However, when going beyond the “microservices 101” googled tutorial, required services communications become more and more complex. Scalable, distributed systems, container-native microservices, and serverless functions benefit from decoupled communications to access other dependent services. Asynchronous (non-blocking) direct or brokered interaction is usually referred to as messaging.

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IoT edge development and deployment with containers through OpenShift: Part 2

IoT edge development and deployment with containers through OpenShift: Part 2

In the first part of this series, we saw how effective a platform as a service (PaaS) such as Red Hat OpenShift is for developing IoT edge applications and distributing them to remote sites, thanks to containers and Red Hat Ansible Automation technologies.

Usually, we think about IoT applications as something specially designed for low power devices with limited capabilities.  IoT devices might use a different CPU architectures or platform. For this reason, we tend to use completely different technologies for IoT application development than for services that run in a data center.

In part two, we explore some techniques that allow you to build and test contains for alternate architectures such as ARM64 on an x86_64 host.  The goal we are working towards is to enable you to use the same language, framework, and development tools for code that runs in your datacenter or all the way out to IoT edge devices. In this article, I’ll show building and running an AArch64 container image on an x86_64 host and then building an RPI3 image to run it on physical hardware using Fedora and Podman.

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