Using Camel-Undertow component supporting http2 connection

This article would help to configure http2 protocol support for the camel-undertow component.

  • Camel’s undertow component use embedded undertow web-container of version undertow-core:jar:1.4.21. This version also supports the http2 connection.
  • I have used camel version 2.21.0-SNAPSHOT from upstream https://github.com/apache/camel.
  • Also, the curl version to test application using camel-undertow component is 7.53.1. This curl version supports –http2 flag for sending an http2 request.
  • I have also used nghttp to test application from linux terminal. However, this article is not about http2 insights.
  • For http2 details, I found articles [1] and [2] helpful.

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Hexagonal Architecture as a Natural fit for Apache Camel

There are architectures and patterns that look cool on paper, and there are ones that are good in practice. Implementing the hexagonal architecture with Camel is both: cool to talk about, and a natural implementation outcome. I love going hexagonal with Camel because it is one of these combinations where the architecture and the tool come together naturally, and many end up doing it without realizing it. Let’s see why that is the case.

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The State of Microservices Survey 2017 – Eight trends you need to know

During the fall of 2017, we conducted a microservices survey with our Red Hat Middleware and Red Hat OpenShift customers. Here are eight interesting trends discerned by the results:

I. Microservices are being used to re-architect existing applications as much as for brand new projects

There seems to be a strong emphasis in the market by technology vendors for positioning microservices as being only for new projects.  However, our survey reveals that organizations are also using microservices to re-architect existing and legacy applications.

Sixty-seven percent of Red Hat Middleware customers and 79 percent of Red Hat OpenShift customers indicated this. This data tells us that microservices offer value to users all along their IT transformation journey — whether they are just looking to update their current application portfolio or are gearing up new initiatives. So, if you are only focused on greenfield projects for microservices, it may be a good idea to also start evaluating your existing applications for a microservice re-architecture analysis. Microservices introduce a set of benefits that our customers have already started seeing, and they are applying these benefits not just to new projects but to existing ones as well.

II. Customers prefer a multi-runtime/multi-technology/multi-framework approach for microservices

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Configuring mKahaDB persistence storage for ActiveMQ

In this post, I wanted to address how to configure mKahaDB persistence storage on ActiveMQ for better management and reducing disk usage.

Default configured KahaDB persistence adapter works well when all the destinations (queues/topics) being managed by the broker have similar performance. However, an enterprise solution where several third parties are involved is never the case.

There are multiple queues or topics and different consumers or listeners listening to these queues/topics. Some consumers might be slower than other consumers. This will grow the message store’s disk usage rapidly. Due to this situation and being single KahaDB all store destinations might perform slow.

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