Cloud-native development with Microprofile 1.2

The purpose of this blog post is to provide an overview of the APIs and specifications in the Eclipse Microprofile 1.2 release. In particular, I’ll try to connect these specifications and APIs with their architectural purpose. Where do they fit and why? If you’re thinking of moving your Java application to the cloud, then this post might be for you.

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JUnit 5 support lands in Eclipse Vert.x for testing asynchronous operations

JUnit 5 is a rewrite of the famous Java testing framework that brings new interesting features, including:

  • nested tests,
  • the ability to give a human-readable description of tests and test cases,
  • a modular extension mechanism that is more powerful than the JUnit 4 runner mechanism (@RunWith annotation),
  • conditional test execution,
  • parameterized tests, including from sources such as CSV data,
  • the support of Java 8 lambda expressions in the reworked built-in assertions API,
  • support for running tests previously written for JUnit 4.

Testing asynchronous operations is not straightforward

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Enabling Byteman Script with Red Hat JBoss Fuse and AMQ – Part 2

In my previous article, Enabling Byteman Script with Red Hat JBoss Fuse and AMQ – Part 1, we found a basic use-case for Byteman scripts with Red Hat JBoss Fuse or Red Hat JBoss AMQ. However, the log file was generated separately and only limited operations were possible. In this article I will show you how to use a Java helper class. By using Java, we get advanced operations to view or modify the content. Also, using java.util.logging allows us to log the statements to fuse.log, avoiding the creation of any other log file.

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Enabling Byteman Script with Red Hat JBoss Fuse and AMQ – Part1

In a production or customer environment it is not always possible to identify issues by looking at logs, nor is it always possible to setup remote debugging using an integrated development environment (IDE) and remote debug port. Often the issues are specific to the environment and can’t be reproduced. Having byteman scripts can help in these situations to identify issues without actual code changes. Whenever certain java class or logic is invoked, byteman scripts will also be invoked as per defined class and method in the byteman script.

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Using Camel-Undertow component supporting http2 connection

This article would help to configure http2 protocol support for the camel-undertow component.

  • Camel’s undertow component use embedded undertow web-container of version undertow-core:jar:1.4.21. This version also supports the http2 connection.
  • I have used camel version 2.21.0-SNAPSHOT from upstream https://github.com/apache/camel.
  • Also, the curl version to test application using camel-undertow component is 7.53.1. This curl version supports –http2 flag for sending an http2 request.
  • I have also used nghttp to test application from linux terminal. However, this article is not about http2 insights.
  • For http2 details, I found articles [1] and [2] helpful.

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Hexagonal Architecture as a Natural fit for Apache Camel

There are architectures and patterns that look cool on paper, and there are ones that are good in practice. Implementing the hexagonal architecture with Camel is both: cool to talk about, and a natural implementation outcome. I love going hexagonal with Camel because it is one of these combinations where the architecture and the tool come together naturally, and many end up doing it without realizing it. Let’s see why that is the case.

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The State of Microservices Survey 2017 – Eight trends you need to know

During the fall of 2017, we conducted a microservices survey with our Red Hat Middleware and Red Hat OpenShift customers. Here are eight interesting trends discerned by the results:

I. Microservices are being used to re-architect existing applications as much as for brand new projects

There seems to be a strong emphasis in the market by technology vendors for positioning microservices as being only for new projects.  However, our survey reveals that organizations are also using microservices to re-architect existing and legacy applications.

Sixty-seven percent of Red Hat Middleware customers and 79 percent of Red Hat OpenShift customers indicated this. This data tells us that microservices offer value to users all along their IT transformation journey — whether they are just looking to update their current application portfolio or are gearing up new initiatives. So, if you are only focused on greenfield projects for microservices, it may be a good idea to also start evaluating your existing applications for a microservice re-architecture analysis. Microservices introduce a set of benefits that our customers have already started seeing, and they are applying these benefits not just to new projects but to existing ones as well.

II. Customers prefer a multi-runtime/multi-technology/multi-framework approach for microservices

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