How to run FIS 2.0 application using source S2I deployment procedure

This article describes how to create and deploy an FIS 2.0 project using the s2i source workflow. It creates a project from scratch and using github repository one can deploy their FIS 2.0 camel and spring-boot based project to an Openshift environment. Below are the steps in the sequence, which should be followed to deploy the application easily.

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Organizing Microservices – Modern Integration

Microservices is probably one of the most popular buzz words among my fellow developer friends, and I do like the concept of being flexible, agile and having simply having more choices. But as a person that worked in the software integration space for years, I started to see some resemblance of the old ESB days.

Looking at the problem from ten thousand feet up. A decade ago, we had to come up with a better way of organizing the spaghetti connection in between systems, stop duplicating effort on the same piece of business logic. That is when service-oriented architecture (SOA) became popular. By modularizing services, sharing them among others systems, and organize ways of communication, routing of data. And ESB is one implementation of that, maybe not necessarily how it should be done.

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Advanced Microservices with .NET

During Red Hat Summit, this past May I along with Scott Hunter from Microsoft took part in a session titled Microservices and OpenShift with .NET Core and .NET Standard 2.0.  I went first and talked about building microservices.

This was an overview demonstrating the evolution through running a program at a command line, a .NET Core program in RHEL. Once completed I then showed just how easy it was to take the image and put into OpenShift and scale it up and down by running it through Docker.

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Kill Your API : The Burger Analogy

The other day I had a chat with the folks working on the OpenAPI initiative and I explained a trick that some of us in enterprises use to get greater speeds and scalability out of our API’s. At first, this may seem like complete sacrilege to those who are a stickler for standards but if you allow me to explain using a simple analogy, you may see how this can be useful…

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Reference Architecture for Agile Integration

Integration is still around but in a different form. So, what does modern integration look like? Looking at how agile scrum has taken over traditional waterfall development framework, by enabling shorter delivery cycles, faster feedback, and having the flexibility to rapidly adapt to changes. I believe it’s time for traditional integration to be agile again. By breaking up traditional ESB into distributed microservices.

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Testing REST APIs with REST Assured

Note: This is an updated version of a post I wrote for my private blog years ago.

While working on the REST API of RHQ a long time ago, I had started writing some integration tests against it. Doing this via pure HTTP calls is very tedious and brittle. So, I was looking for a testing framework to help me and found one that I used for some time. I tried to enhance it a bit to better suit my needs but didn’t really get it to work.

I started searching again and this time found REST Assured, which is almost perfect as it provides a high-level fluent Java API to write tests. REST Assured can be used with the classic test runners like JUnit or TestNG.

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