Building containerized applications

Learn how containers and Kubernetes have changed development process and development tools.  

Red Hat’s lightweight, open standards-based container toolkit is now fully supported and included with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8. Built with enterprise IT security needs in mind, Buildah (container building), Podman (running containers), and Skopeo (sharing/finding containers) help developers find, run, build, and share containerized applications more quickly and efficiently, thanks to the distributed and daemonless nature of the tools. 

What are Red Hat's tools for containers?

Linux containers are ideal for deploying microservices-based, cloud-native applications. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 contains and fully supports Red Hat’s lightweight, open standards-based container toolkit. It also provides several new features to simplify and improve container development, management, and security.

 

Buildah

Buildah

Buildah allows you to build and modify containers without any daemon or docker. It preserves your existing dockerfile workflow while allowing detailed control over image layers, content, and commits. Buildah also minimizes container image size by using tools from the container host rather than adding them to the container image.

Podman

Podman

Podman is a complete, daemonless container engine for running, managing, and debugging OCI-compliant containers and pods. It lets you manage containers without the daemon dependency and is docker command-line interface (CLI) compatible. Podman also provides improved integration with systemd. With Podman, you can easily find, build, run, and share containers. Switching from Docker to Podman is easy and intuitive—two commands are all you need.

Skopeo

Skopeo

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 also includes Skopeo, a new, comprehensive tool and library for inspecting, signing, and transferring container images. This advanced container sharing allows you to inspect, verify, and sign image manifests. Move container images between registries. Skopeo uses the same code-base library used by Buildah, Podman, and CRI-O, a lightweight container engine for Kubernetes.

Podman guide for containers cover image

Podman guide for containers

Podman is one of the next-generation container tools (along with Buildah and Skopeo) included in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.6 and later. This cheat sheet covers all of the commands that focus on images, containers, and container resources.

 

This cheat sheet explains how to:

  • Find, build, and remove images.
  • Run containers on images.
  • Manage container processes and resources.
  • Work with a container's filesystem.

 

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Use enterprise-grade containers to develop in a hybrid world

Part of the beauty of Linux containers is that they are hybrid by design. That means you can code locally, test in the cloud, and deploy anywhere that Linux containers will run. Most Red Hat developer components are available with dockerfiles, or distributed as Linux container images on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (for local dev) and Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (local, on-line, or public cloud dev). This means that wherever you develop, test, and deploy, you’re using the same development stacks, on-premise to virtual to cloud. To help you get where you’re going faster, the Red Hat container catalog gives you access to certified, trusted and secure application containers.

 

Try a container

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