software collections

Working with Red Hat Enterprise Linux Universal Base Images (UBI)

Working with Red Hat Enterprise Linux Universal Base Images (UBI)

If you’re like me—a developer who works with customers who rely on the tried-and-true Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), works with containerized applications, and also prefers to work with Fedora Linux as their desktop operating system—you’re excited by the announcement of the Universal Base Images (UBI). This article shows how UBI actually works, by building the container image for a simple PHP application.

With UBI, you can build and redistribute container images based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux without requiring a Red Hat subscription. Users of UBI-based container images do not need Red Hat subscriptions. No more extra work creating CentOS-based container images for your community projects or for your customers that prefer self-support.

I tested all these steps on my personal Fedora 29 system, and they should work on any Linux distribution. I am also a big fan of the new container tools such as Podman, which should be available to your favorite Linux distribution. If you are working on a Windows or MacOS system, you can replace the Podman commands with Docker.

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Red Hat Software Collections 3.3 Beta: New and updated components

Red Hat Software Collections 3.3 Beta: New and updated components

Red Hat Software Collections supply the latest, stable versions of development tools for Red Hat Enterprise Linux via two release trains per year. We are pleased to introduce three new and two updated components in this release, Red Hat Software Collections 3.3 Beta.

The new components are:

  • Ruby 2.6
  • MariaDB 10.3 featuring a new MariaDB Connector for Java
  • Redis 5.0

The updated items include:

  • Two updates to Apache httpd
  • One update to HAProxy

See below for component details.

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Support Lifecycle for Clang/LLVM, Go, and Rust

Support Lifecycle for Clang/LLVM, Go, and Rust

On the heels of our recently announcement, General Availability of Clang/LLVM 6.0, Go 1.10, and Rust 1.29, I want to share how we’ll be supporting them going forward. Previously, these packages had been in “Technology Preview” status, which means that they were provided for “you to test functionality and provide feedback during the development process”, and were “not fully supported under Red Hat Subscription Level Agreements, may not be functionally complete, and are not intended for production use”.

So now that we’ve promoted them to fully supported status, what does that mean? In the simplest terms, General Availability (GA) means that these packages have officially entered the “Full Support Phase” of their lifecycle:

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How to install Clang/LLVM 5 and GCC 7 on RHEL

How to install Clang/LLVM 5 and GCC 7 on RHEL

A newer version of this article is available:  How to install GCC 8 and Clang/LLVM 6 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

If you are developing with C/C++, Clang tools and newer versions of GCC can be quite helpful for checking your code and giving you better warnings and error messages to help avoid bugs. The newer compilers have better optimizations and code generation.

You can easily install the latest-supported Clang and GCC compilers for C, C++, Objective-C, and FORTRAN using yum on Red Hat Enterprise Linux.  These compilers are available as software collections that are typically updated twice a year. The May 2018 update included Clang/LLVM 5 and GCC 7.3, as well as Go and Rust.

If you want your default gcc to always be GCC 7, or you want clang to always be in your path, this article shows how to permanently enable a software collection by adding it to the profile (dot files) for your user account. A number of common questions about software collections are also answered.

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Expanding architectural choices to better arm Red Hat Enterprise Linux developers

Expanding architectural choices to better arm Red Hat Enterprise Linux developers

Red Hat Enterprise Linux continues to deliver the best possible experience for enterprise system administrators and developers, as well as provide a solid foundation for moving workloads into both public and private clouds. One of the ways to enable such ubiquity is Red Hat’s multi-architecture initiative, which focuses on bringing Red Hat’s software portfolio to different hardware architectures.

Last week, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 went live. It brought forward several improvements relevant to developers and system administrators such as advanced GUI system management via the Cockpit console, which should help new Linux administrators, developers, and Windows users to perform expert tasks without having to get into the command line.

This release also marks a new milestone for Red Hat Enterprise Linux: all supported architectures are now simultaneously enabled. The list of supported architectures includes x86_64, PowerPC Big Endian and Little Endian, s390x, and the more recently introduced 64-bit Arm and IBM POWER9 architectures.

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Create a scalable REST API with Falcon and RHSCL

Create a scalable REST API with Falcon and RHSCL

APIs are critical to automation, integration and developing cloud-native applications, and it’s vital they can be scaled to meet the demands of your user-base. In this article, we’ll create a database-backed REST API based on the Python Falcon framework using Red Hat Software Collections (RHSCL), test how it performs, and scale-out in response to a growing user-base.

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Getting started with rust-toolset

Getting started with rust-toolset

One of the new software collections we’ve introduced this fall is for Rust, the programming language that aims for memory and thread safety without compromising performance. Dangling pointers and data races are caught at compile time, while still optimizing to fast native code without a language runtime!

In rust-toolset-7, we’re including everything you need to start programming in Rust on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, in the familiar format of software collections. In this release, we’re shipping Rust 1.20 and its matching Cargo 0.21 – both as Tech Preview. (NOTE: The “-7” in our toolset name is to sync with the other collections now being released, devtoolset-7, go-toolset-7, and llvm-toolset-7.)

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Use Software Collections without Bothering with Alternative Path

Use Software Collections without Bothering with Alternative Path

Software Collections (SCL) give you the power to build, install, and use multiple versions of software on the same system, without affecting system-wide installed packages. Therefore, the Software Collections packaging technique is used a lot for building stacks for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and CentOS, especially dynamic languages (Python, Ruby, NodeJS) or databases (PostgreSQL, MariaDB, MongoDB).

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Red Hat updates Python, PHP, Node.js, more; supports new arches

Red Hat updates Python, PHP, Node.js, more; supports new arches

I am pleased to announce the immediate availability of Red Hat Software Collections 3.0 Beta, Red Hat’s newest installment of open source development tools, dynamic languages, databases, and more. Delivered on a separate lifecycle from Red Hat Enterprise Linux with a more frequent release cadence, Red Hat Software Collections bridges development agility and production stability by helping you create modern applications that can be confidently deployed into production. Most of these components are also available in Linux container image format to streamline microservices development.

In addition to these new components having traditional support for x86_64, Red Hat Software Collection 3.0 Beta adds support for three new architectures: s390x, aarch64, and ppc64le.

NEW ADDITIONS to Red Hat Software Collections 3.0 Beta include:

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