apache camel

Extending Kafka connectivity with Apache Camel Kafka connectors

Extending Kafka connectivity with Apache Camel Kafka connectors

Apache Kafka is one of the most used pieces of software in modern application development because of its distributed nature, high throughput, and horizontal scalability. Every day more and more organizations are adopting Kafka as the central event bus for their event-driven architecture. As a result, more and more data flows through the cluster, making the connectivity requirements rise in priority for any backlog. For this reason, the Apache Camel community released the first iteration of Kafka Connect connectors for the purpose of easing the burden on development teams.

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Six reasons to love Camel K

Six reasons to love Camel K

Apache Camel K is a lightweight cloud-integration platform that runs natively on Kubernetes and, in particular, lets you automate your cloud configurations. Based on the famous Apache Camel, Camel K is designed and optimized for serverless and microservices architectures. In this article, I discuss six ways that Camel K transforms how developers work with Kubernetes, Red Hat OpenShift, and Knative on cloud platforms.

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Operator SDK: Build Kubernetes Operators and deploy them on OpenShift

Operator SDK: Build Kubernetes Operators and deploy them on OpenShift

The Operator SDK makes it simple to build Kubernetes-native applications, providing the tools to build, test, and package Operators. The SDK also helps the developer to build Operators without requiring knowledge of Kubernetes API complexities.

In this article, we will create a sample Operator for deploying a sample application based on Spring Boot and Camel. This application is a simple Camel route that uses the undertow component. After building the Operator, we will deploy it on an OpenShift cluster.

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Decoupling microservices with Apache Camel and Debezium

Decoupling microservices with Apache Camel and Debezium

The rise of microservices-oriented architecture brought us new development paradigms and mantras about independent development and decoupling. In such a scenario, we have to deal with a situation where we aim for independence, but we still need to react to state changes in different enterprise domains.

I’ll use a simple and typical example in order to show what we’re talking about. Imagine the development of two independent microservices: Order and User. We designed them to expose a REST interface and to each use a separate database, as shown in Figure 1:

Diagram 1 - Order and User microservices

Figure 1: Order and User microservices.

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Subsecond deployment and startup of Apache Camel applications

Subsecond deployment and startup of Apache Camel applications

The integration space is in constant change. Many open source projects and closed source technologies did not withstand the tests of time and have disappeared from the middleware stacks for good. After a decade, however, Apache Camel is still here and becoming even stronger for the next decade of integration. In this article, I’ll provide some history of Camel and then describe two changes coming to Apache Camel now (and later to Red Hat Fuse) and why they are important for developers. I call these changes subsecond deployment and subsecond startup of Camel applications.

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Guru Night at Red Hat Summit: Hands-on experience with serverless computing

Guru Night at Red Hat Summit: Hands-on experience with serverless computing

Millions of developers worldwide want to learn more about serverless computing. If you’re one of the lucky thousands attending Red Hat Summit in Boston May 7-9, you can gain hands-on experience with the help of Burr Sutter and the Red Hat Developer team.

Guru Night is a BYOL (bring your own laptop) event taking place Wednesday, May 8 from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at the Boston Convention and Event Center in ML2 East-258AB. (Doubtless there will be a map to show you where or what ML2 East etc. is; we have no idea.) Head to the signup page and fill out your details now.

TL;DR: Beer and pizza will be served.

We felt compelled to point that out. But read on.

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Red Hat AMQ 6.3 on OpenShift: Set up, connect SSL client, and configure logging

Red Hat AMQ 6.3 on OpenShift: Set up, connect SSL client, and configure logging

In this article, we will discuss how to set up Red Hat AMQ 6.3 on OpenShift. We will also set up an external Camel-based SSL client to connect to AMQ Broker, a pure-Java multiprotocol message broker.

By using the procedures in this article, you can easily set up the broker in your OpenShift environment and also set up a Camel-based client to quickly produce and consume messages. Also, you can change the log level to get verbose logs, thus getting a better understanding of the complete setup.

I recommend using a source-to-image (s2i) approach for deploying Red Hat AMQ 6.x on OpenShift, but if you do not use an s2i  approach, this article will help you to configure logging to get verbose logs.  Note that the Red Hat AMQ image used here is ephemeral; it doesn’t support persistence.

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