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Containerize .NET for Red Hat OpenShift: Linux containers and .NET Core

Containerize .NET for Red Hat OpenShift: Linux containers and .NET Core

When .NET was released to the open source world (November 12, 2014—not that I remember the date or anything), it didn’t just bring .NET to open source; it brought open source to .NET. Linux containers were one of the then-burgeoning, now-thriving technologies that became available to .NET developers. At that time, it was “docker, docker, docker” all the time. Now, it’s Podman and Buildah, and Kubernetes, and Red Hat OpenShift, and serverless, and … well, you get the idea. Things have progressed, and your .NET applications can progress, as well.

This article is part of a series introducing three ways to containerize .NET applications on Red Hat OpenShift. I’ll start with a high-level overview of Linux containers and .NET Core, then discuss a couple of ways to build and containerize .NET Core applications and deploy them on OpenShift.

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How to pick the right container base image

How to pick the right container base image

Picking the right container base image feels hard for a lot of people. Every major Linux distribution offers a base image. Open source projects for programming languages like Python, Ruby, and Node.js offer their own base images. Many open source projects and vendors also provide their own images for services like MariaDB, Redis, Elastic, and MySQL. While programming languages and services are not technically base images, most people perceive them as such and include them in their analysis when choosing standardized base images.

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Get started with clang-tidy in Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Get started with clang-tidy in Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Clang-tidy is a standalone linter tool for checking C and C++ source code files. It provides an additional set of compiler warnings—called checks—that go above and beyond what is typically included in a C or C++ compiler. Clang-tidy comes with a large set of built-in checks and a framework for writing your own checks, as well.

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Get started with XDP

Get started with XDP

XDP (eXpress Data Path) is a powerful new networking feature in Linux that enables high-performance programmable access to networking packets before they enter the networking stack. But XDP has a high learning curve. Many developers have written introduction blogs for this feature, such as Paolo Abeni’s Achieving high-performance, low-latency networking with XDP: Part I and Toke’s Using the eXpress Data Path (XDP) in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.

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Integrate Red Hat’s single sign-on technology 7.4 with Red Hat OpenShift

Integrate Red Hat’s single sign-on technology 7.4 with Red Hat OpenShift

In this article, you will learn how to integrate Red Hat’s single sign-on technology 7.4 with Red Hat OpenShift 4. For this integration, we’ll use the PostgreSQL database. PostgreSQL requires a persistent storage database provided by an external Network File System (NFS) server partition.

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No more Java in vscode-xml 0.15.0!

No more Java in vscode-xml 0.15.0!

Among other improvements and bug fixes in the vscode-xml extension 0.15.0 release, you can now run the extension without needing Java. We know the Java requirement discouraged many people from trying the extension. We have included a new setting, Prefer Binary (xml.server.preferBinary) that lets you choose between the Java server and the new binary server. We’re excited to remove the Java restriction from Red Hat’s XML extension for Visual Studio Code in vscode-xml 0.15.0. Keep reading to find out how we did it.

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A guide to Red Hat OpenShift 4.5 installer-provisioned infrastructure on vSphere

A guide to Red Hat OpenShift 4.5 installer-provisioned infrastructure on vSphere

With Red Hat OpenShift 4, Red Hat completely re-architected how developers install, upgrade, and manage OpenShift to develop applications on Kubernetes. Under the hood, the installation process uses the OpenShift installer to automate container host provisioning using Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) CoreOS. It is then easy to initialize the cluster and set up the cloud domain name system (DNS), load balancer, storage, and so on.

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