Containers

Kubernetes configuration patterns, Part 2: Patterns for Kubernetes controllers

Kubernetes configuration patterns, Part 2: Patterns for Kubernetes controllers

This article is the second in a two-part article series on Kubernetes configuration patterns, which you can use to configure your Kubernetes applications and controllers. The first article introduced patterns and antipatterns that use only Kubernetes primitives. Those simple patterns are applicable to any application. This second article describes more advanced patterns that require coding against the Kubernetes API, which is what a Kubernetes controller should use.

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Building resilient event-driven architectures with Apache Kafka

Building resilient event-driven architectures with Apache Kafka

Even though cloud-native computing has been around for some time—the Cloud Native Computing Foundation was started in 2015; an eon in computer time—not every developer has experienced the, uh, “joy” of dealing with distributed systems. The old patterns of thinking and architecting systems have given way to new ideas and new problems. For example, it’s not always possible (or advisable) to connect to a database and run transactions. Databases themselves are giving way to events and Command Query Responsibility Segregation (CQRS) and eventual consistency. Two-phase commits are being replaced with queues and database sagas, while monoliths are replaced with microservices, containers, and Kubernetes. “Small and local” thinking rules the day.

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Event-driven APIs and schema governance for Apache Kafka: Get ready for Kafka Summit Europe 2021

Event-driven APIs and schema governance for Apache Kafka: Get ready for Kafka Summit Europe 2021

As a developer, I’m always excited to attend the Kafka Summit, happening this year from May 11 to 12. There are so many great sessions addressing critical challenges in the Apache Kafka ecosystem. One example is how changes to event-driven APIs are leading developers to focus on contract-first development for Kafka.

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Containerize .NET for Red Hat OpenShift: Use a Windows VM like a container

Containerize .NET for Red Hat OpenShift: Use a Windows VM like a container

Embracing the future—making the transition from legacy monolithic applications running on .NET Framework to microservices and images running in containers (or pods)—is a tall task. If only there were a safe, proceed-at-your-own-pace way to make the change, one that was familiar yet led to a new destination. Of course, there is such a path; otherwise, I wouldn’t be writing this article. In this article, the last in my series introducing three ways to containerize .NET applications on Red Hat OpenShift, we’ll look at running Windows virtual machines (VMs) on OpenShift, and treating them like containers.

In case you missed them, here are the two other articles in the “Containerize .NET for Red Hat OpenShift” series:

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Kubernetes configuration patterns, Part 1: Patterns for Kubernetes primitives

Kubernetes configuration patterns, Part 1: Patterns for Kubernetes primitives

This article is the first in a two-part article series on Kubernetes configuration patterns, which represent ways of configuring Kubernetes applications and controllers. Part 1 introduces simple approaches that use only Kubernetes primitives. These patterns are applicable to any application running on Kubernetes. Part 2 will introduce more advanced patterns. These patterns require you to code against the Kubernetes API when you are developing Kubernetes controllers.

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4 reasons you’ll love using Red Hat OpenShift Data Science

4 reasons you’ll love using Red Hat OpenShift Data Science

Red Hat OpenShift Data Science is a managed cloud service built from a curated set of components from the upstream Open Data Hub project. It aims to provide a stable sandbox in which data scientists can develop, train, and test their machine learning (ML) workloads and then deploy results in a container-ready format. This article summarizes the advantages of using OpenShift Data Science in your machine learning projects.

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Deploying the Mosquitto MQTT message broker on Red Hat OpenShift, Part 2

Deploying the Mosquitto MQTT message broker on Red Hat OpenShift, Part 2

The first half of this article introduced the Mosquitto  Message Queuing Telemetry Transport  (MQTT) message broker and showed how to build Mosquitto into an image suitable for use in a container. In this second half of the article, you will configure and deploy the Mosquitto image into an application that runs on Red Hat OpenShift. You can obtain the files for the example from my GitHub repository.

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Containerize .NET for Red Hat OpenShift: Windows containers and .NET Framework

Containerize .NET for Red Hat OpenShift: Windows containers and .NET Framework

Developers who use and target Microsoft’s .NET Framework are no longer outsiders looking in when it comes to developing container-based applications. Whether porting an existing application (for example, a website running in IIS) or creating a new microservice, or somewhere in between, it is now possible—thanks to Windows containers—to deploy .NET Framework applications to your Kubernetes or Red Hat OpenShift clusters. This article explores the option of running .NET Framework applications in Windows containers in OpenShift clusters.

Note: This article is part of a series introducing three ways to containerize .NET applications on Red Hat OpenShift. The previous article introduced Linux containers for .NET Core.

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Using Podman Compose with Microcks: A cloud-native API mocking and testing tool

Using Podman Compose with Microcks: A cloud-native API mocking and testing tool

Microcks is a cloud-native API mocking and testing tool. It helps you cover your API’s full lifecycle by taking your OpenAPI specifications and generating live mocks from them. It can also assert that your API implementation conforms to your OpenAPI specifications. You can deploy Microcks in a wide variety of cloud-native platforms, such as Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift. Developers who do not have corporate access to a cloud-native platform have used Docker Compose. Although Docker is still the most popular container option for software packaging and installation, Podman is gaining traction.

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