MicroProfile

Announcing: Thorntail 2.2 General Availability

Announcing: Thorntail 2.2 General Availability

An Introduction to Thorntail

Today Red Hat is making Thorntail 2.2 generally available to Red Hat customers through a subscription to Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR). RHOAR provides application developers with a variety of application runtimes running on the OpenShift Container Platform.

Thorntail is the new name for WildFly Swarm, and bundles everything you need to develop and run Thorntail and MicroProfile applications by packaging server runtime libraries with your application code and running it with java -jar. It speeds up the transition from monoliths to microservices and takes advantage of your existing industry standard Java EE technology experience.

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Deploying MicroProfile apps on Microsoft Azure using the Azure Open Service Broker

Deploying MicroProfile apps on Microsoft Azure using the Azure Open Service Broker

At the recently concluded Microsoft Ignite 2018 conference in Orlando, I had the honor of presenting to a crowd of Java developers and Azure professionals eager to learn how to put their Java skills to work building next-gen apps on Azure. Of course, that meant showcasing the technology coming out of the popular MicroProfile community, in which Red Hat plays a big part (and makes a fully supported, productized MicroProfile implementation through Thorntail, part of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes).

We did a demo too, which is the main topic of this blog post, showing how easy it is to link your Java MicroProfile apps to Azure services through the Open Service Broker for Azure (the open source, Open Service Broker-compatible API server that provisions managed services in the Microsoft Azure public cloud) and OpenShift’s Service Catalog.

Here’s how to reproduce the demo.

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Are App Servers Dead in the Age of Kubernetes? (Part 2)

Are App Servers Dead in the Age of Kubernetes? (Part 2)

Welcome to the second in a series of posts on Kubernetes, application servers, and the future. Part 1, Kubernetes is the new application operating environment, discussed Kubernetes and its place in application development. In this part, we explore application servers and their role in relation to Kubernetes.

You may recall from  that we were exploring the views put forth in Why Kubernetes is The New Application Server and thinking about what those views mean for Java EE, Jakarta EE, Eclipse MicroProfile, and application servers. Is it a curtain call for application servers? Are we seeing the start of an imminent decline in their favor and usage?

Before answering that, we need to discuss the use case for application servers. Then can we decide whether it’s still a valid use case.

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Kubernetes is the new application operating environment (Part 1)

Kubernetes is the new application operating environment (Part 1)

This is the first in a series of articles that consider the role of Kubernetes and application servers. Do application servers need to exist? Where does the current situation leave developers trying to choose the right path forward for their applications?

Why Kubernetes is the new application server

By now you’ve likely read “Why Kubernetes is The New Application Server” and you might be wondering what that means for you. How does it impact Java EE or Jakarta EE and Eclipse MicroProfile? What about application servers or fat JARs? Is it the end as we’ve known it for nearly two decades?

In reality, it doesn’t impact the worldview for most. It’s in line with the efforts of a majority of vendors around Docker and Kubernetes deployments over the last few years. In addition, there’s greater interest in service mesh infrastructures, such as Istio, and how they can further assist with managing Kubernetes deployments.

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Eclipse MicroProfile and Red Hat Update: Thorntail and SmallRye

Eclipse MicroProfile and Red Hat Update: Thorntail and SmallRye

During the last three months, there have been some changes regarding Eclipse MicroProfile at Red Hat. If you haven’t been following the details, this post recaps what’s changed and introduces Thorntail and SmallRye.

Bye-bye WildFly Swarm! Hello Thorntail!

You may have missed this important news. Our MicroProfile implementation changed its name two months ago.

After a lot of feedback from the community, we decided to rename “WildFly Swarm” to Thorntail. While the former name was nice, we found that the “Swarm” term was a bit overloaded in the IT industry and could be confusing. It’s the same for the “WildFly” part; sharing this name with our Java EE application server was a source of confusion for some users, making them think it was a subproject of WildFly.

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Why Kubernetes is The New Application Server

Why Kubernetes is The New Application Server

Have you ever wondered why you are deploying your multi-platform applications using containers? Is it just a matter of “following the hype”? In this article, I’m going to ask some provocative questions to make my case for Why Kubernetes is the new application server.

You might have noticed that the majority of languages are interpreted and use “runtimes” to execute your source code. In theory, most Node.js, Python, and Ruby code can be easily moved from one platform (Windows, Mac, Linux) to another platform. Java applications go even further by having the compiled Java class turned into a bytecode, capable of running anywhere that has a JVM (Java Virtual Machine).

The Java ecosystem provides a standard format to distribute all Java classes that are part of the same application. You can package these classes as a JAR (Java Archive), WAR (Web Archive), and EAR (Enterprise Archive) that contains the front end, back end, and libraries embedded. So I ask you: Why do you use containers to distribute your Java application? Isn’t it already supposed to be easily portable between environments?

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Next DevNation Live: Jakarta EE: The Future of Java EE, May 3rd, 12pm EDT

Next DevNation Live: Jakarta EE: The Future of Java EE, May 3rd, 12pm EDT

In case you missed it, Jakarta EE is officially out! Java EE was given a new home at the Eclipse Foundation and on February 26, 2018 Jakarta EE was chosen as the new name for Java EE. Join us at the next online DevNation Live Tech Talk on Thursday, May 3rd at 12pm EDT. The topic is “Jakarta EE: The Future of Java EE” presented by Dr. Mark Little, and hosted by Burr Sutter.

Java EE has been the dominant enterprise Java standard for well over a decade. With the release of Jakarta EE, we all have a chance to collaborate and build on the good things it inherits, while working to evolve those pieces that were perhaps never quite what was needed.

What does this mean for the future of enterprise Java and traditional Java application servers? Join us to gain an understanding of where Jakarta EE is heading and how you can help drive the future of enterprise Java.

Register now and join the live presentation at 12pm EDT, Thursday, May 3rd.

Session Agenda

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Develop Cloud-native Applications with MicroProfile (Config & Health Check) and OpenShift

Develop Cloud-native Applications with MicroProfile (Config & Health Check) and OpenShift

A previous article described the specifications in the Eclipse MicroProfile 1.2 release and the benefits for Java-based cloud-native applications. This article shows how software developers writing Java-based microservices can leverage those specifications to take advantage of the management capabilities provided by Red Hat OpenShift.

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Cloud-native development with Microprofile 1.2

Cloud-native development with Microprofile 1.2

The purpose of this blog post is to provide an overview of the APIs and specifications in the Eclipse Microprofile 1.2 release. In particular, I’ll try to connect these specifications and APIs with their architectural purpose. Where do they fit and why? If you’re thinking of moving your Java application to the cloud, then this post might be for you.

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