Eclipse Che

Add Java language support for Apache Camel K inside Eclipse Che

Add Java language support for Apache Camel K inside Eclipse Che

Apache Camel K should be as lightweight as possible. Therefore, the Camel K project provides standalone Java files that describe a Camel integration. The downside to this practice is that existing IDEs cannot provide complete support out of the box. A few months ago, I mentioned the Java language support for Apache Camel K that was discussed in Red Hat Visual Studio Code (VS Code) extension, and how it provides Java language support for Apache Camel K. In this article and demo, I show you how to do the same with Eclipse Che and che.openshift.io.

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Vulnerability analysis with Red Hat CodeReady Dependency Analytics and Snyk Intel

Vulnerability analysis with Red Hat CodeReady Dependency Analytics and Snyk Intel

Red Hat CodeReady Dependency Analytics is a hosted service on OpenShift that provides vulnerability and compliance analysis for your applications, directly from your IDE. It automatically analyzes your software composition and provides recommendations to address security holes and licensing issues. The 0.1 release of CodeReady Dependency Analytics includes access to the Snyk Intel Vulnerability Database, which is a curated database of both unique and known open source software security advisories.

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Automate workshop setup with Ansible playbooks and CodeReady Workspaces

Automate workshop setup with Ansible playbooks and CodeReady Workspaces

At Red Hat, we do many in-person and virtual workshops for customers, partners, and other open source developers. In most cases, the workshops are of the “bring your own device” variety, so we face a range of hardware and software setups and corporate endpoint-protection schemes, as well as different levels of system knowledge.

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Develop Eclipse MicroProfile applications on Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform Expansion Pack 1.0 with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces

Develop Eclipse MicroProfile applications on Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform Expansion Pack 1.0 with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces

This article builds on my previous tutorial, Enable Eclipse MicroProfile applications on Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.3. To follow the examples, you must have Eclipse MicroProfile enabled in your Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform Expansion Pack (JBoss EAP XP) 1.0.0.GA installation, via Red Hat CodeReady Studio. See the previous article for installation instructions.

In this article, we will use the installed MicroProfile-enabled image to set up a JBoss EAP XP quickstart project in Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces (CRW). You can also apply what you learn from this article to develop your own applications using CodeReady Workspaces.

Note: For more examples, be sure to see the video demonstration at the end of the article.

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How to install CodeReady Workspaces in a restricted OpenShift 4 environment

How to install CodeReady Workspaces in a restricted OpenShift 4 environment

It’s your first day as a Java programmer, right out of college. You have received your badge, a shiny new laptop, and all of your software requests have been approved. Everything seems to be going well.

You install Eclipse and set up the required Java Development Kit (JDK) in your new development environment. You clone a project from the company’s GitHub repository, modify the code, and make your first commit. You are excited to be working on your first project.

But then, a few hours later, a senior programmer asks what version of the JDK you used. It seems that the pipeline is reporting a project failure. All you did was commit Java source code, not binary, and it worked perfectly on your local machine. What could possibly have gone wrong?

Coding in a restricted environment

The issue I described is well-known among programmers as the “It works on my computer, and I don’t know why it doesn’t work on your computer” problem. Fortunately, this is the type of problem Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces (CRW) can help you solve. CodeReady Workspaces is a cloud-based IDE based on Che. Whereas Che is an open source project, CRW is an enterprise-ready development environment that provides the security, stability, and consistency that many corporations require. All you have to do is open the CRW link in a web browser, sign in with your user credentials, and code inside the browser.

In this article, I show you how to install CodeReady Workspaces in a restricted Red Hat OpenShift 4 environment.

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API login and JWT token generation using Keycloak

API login and JWT token generation using Keycloak

Red Hat single sign-on (SSO)—or its open source version, Keycloak—is one of the leading products for web SSO capabilities, and is based on popular standards such as Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML) 2.0, OpenID Connect, and OAuth 2.0. One of Red Hat SSO’s strongest features is that we can access Keycloak directly in many ways, whether through a simple HTML login form, or an API call. In the following scenario, we will generate a JWT token and then validate it. Everything will be done using API calls, so Keycloak’s UI is not exposed to the public directly.

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An overview of Eclipse Che

An overview of Eclipse Che

This video is a brief overview of Eclipse Che presented by CodeReady Workspaces Product Manager Stévan Le Meur. The tour starts in a git repo that contains a link to a Che factory. Opening that factory loads the code from the git repo and sets up a complete development environment. From there, Stévan covers how to build, run, and debug the code within Che.

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Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 2

Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 2

This is the second half of my series covering how to use Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces to develop a Java Enterprise Edition (now Jakarta EE) application using Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP) in the cloud on Red Hat OpenShift/Kubernetes. In the first part, we saw how to:

  • Bring your own tools by extending Red Hat’s provided stacks
  • Register your own stack within Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces
  • Create your workspace using your stack and embedding your JEE project located on a Git repository

For this second part, we’ll start configuring the workspace by adding some helpful settings and commands for building and running a JBoss EAP project. We’ll then see how to use the local JBoss EAP instance for deploying and debugging our application. Finally, we’ll create a factory so that we’ll be able to share our work and propose an on-demand configured development environment for anyone that needs to collaborate on our project.

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Extending Eclipse Che 7 to use VS Code extensions

Extending Eclipse Che 7 to use VS Code extensions

Recently the Eclipse Che community has been working to make Eclipse Theia the default web IDE for Eclipse Che 7. We’ve added a plugin model to Eclipse Theia that is compatible with Visual Studio Code (VS Code) extensions. Che 7 users will eventually be able to take advantage of extensions that have been written for VS Code in their cloud-based developer workspaces. It’s worth pointing out the popularity of VS Code extensions. Red Hat has contributed extensions covering Java, XML, YAML, OpenShift, and dependency analytics. The Java extension provided by Red Hat has been downloaded over 10 million times!

If you aren’t familiar with Eclipse Theia, Che 6 and earlier used a GWT-based IDE. While it is possible to develop and use plugins in that environment, it is cumbersome. Coming from tools like VS Code, developers expect to be able to customize and extend their workspaces at runtime. Eclipse Theia is an extensible open-source framework to develop multi-language IDEs using state-of-the-art web technologies. Moving to Theia as the default IDE for Che 7 provides a foundation to enrich the developer workspaces in Che. See the series of articles by Stevan LeMeur for more information about what’s coming in Che 7.

This article explains why we decided to add the new plugin model to Eclipse Theia and the benefits for Eclipse Che 7 developer workspaces. I also cover how the new plugin model differs from the existing Theia extension model.

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