Istio Circuit Breaker: When Failure Is An Option

The phrase “Failure is not an option” is tossed about with much bravado, as though one could make something work by just their strength of will. But the fact remains, things eventually fail. Everything. How then, do you handle the inevitable failure of your microservices? Well, by combining containers, Kubernetes, Red Hat OpenShift, and Istio, we can skip over-the-top displays of swagger, let the system handle things, and get some sleep at night.

Once again, Istio provides the basis of a popular and well-tested technology: The Circuit Breaker Pattern.

Like a circuit breaker in an electrical circuit, the software version allows flow to a service to be shut off. The circuit opens in the case where the endpoint is not functioning correctly. The endpoint may have failed or may just be too slow, but it represents the same problem: this container is not working.

Continue reading “Istio Circuit Breaker: When Failure Is An Option”

Share
Red Hat Developer Program

Istio Route Rules: Telling Service Requests Where To Go

OpenShift and Kubernetes do a great job of working to make sure calls to your microservice are routed to the correct pods. After all, that’s one of the raison d’être for Kubernetes: routing and load balancing. What if, however, you want to customize the routing? What if you want to run two versions at the same time? How do Istio Route Rules handle this?

Continue reading “Istio Route Rules: Telling Service Requests Where To Go”

Share

Announcing: Node.js General Availability in Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Node.js Foundation Logo

Summary

Today Red Hat is making Node.js generally available to Red Hat customers through a subscription to Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR). RHOAR provides application developers with a variety of application runtimes running on the OpenShift Container Platform.

Node.js is based on the V8 JavaScript engine and allows you to write server-side JavaScript applications. Node.js joins the existing set of supported runtimes and offers developers an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.

Continue reading “Announcing: Node.js General Availability in Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes”

Share

Introducing conu – Scripting Containers Made Easier

There has been a need for a simple, easy-to-use handler for writing tests and other code around containers that would implement helpful methods and utilities. For this we introduce conu, a low-level Python library.

This project has been driven from the start by the requirements of container maintainers and testers. In addition to basic image and container management methods, it provides other often used functions, such as container mount, shortcut methods for getting an IP address, exposed ports, logs, name, image extending using source-to-image, and many others.

Continue reading “Introducing conu – Scripting Containers Made Easier”

Share

Red Hat Summit 2018 to focus on Modern App Development

On behalf of the selection teams for Modern Application Development, I am pleased to share this exciting, dynamic, and diverse set of developer-related breakouts, workshops, BoFs, and labs for Red Hat Summit 2018.

With these 61+ sessions listed below, we believe that every attending application developer will come away with a strong understanding of where Red Hat is headed in this app dev space, and obtain a good foundation for tackling that next generation of apps. Encompassing various aspects of Modern App Dev, some sub-topics we’ve focused on are around microservices, service mesh, security and AI/ML, plus there is a large collection of complementary and related topics.

So…if you’re an application developer, we invite you to attend Red Hat Summit 2018 and experience the code first hand. There’s something for everyone and definitely something for you. Register today.

Great talks don’t happen without great speakers, and we feel really privileged to have these popular, high-in-demand speakers:

Continue reading “Red Hat Summit 2018 to focus on Modern App Development”

Share

A Practical Introduction to Container Terminology

You might think containers seem like a pretty straightforward concept, so why do I need to read about container terminology? In my work as a container technology evangelist, I’ve encountered misuse of container terminology that causes people to stumble on the road to mastering containers. Terms like containers and images are used interchangeably, but there are important conceptual differences. In the world of containers, repository has a different meaning than what you’d expect. Additionally, the landscape for container technologies is larger than just docker. Without a good handle on the terminology, It can be difficult to grasp the key differences between docker and (pick your favorites, CRI-O, rkt, lxc/lxd) or understand what the Open Container Initiative is doing to standardize container technology.

Background

It is deceptively simple to get started with Linux Containers. It takes only a few minutes to install a container engine like docker and run your first commands. Within another few minutes, you are building your first container image and sharing it. Next, you begin the familiar process of architecting a production-like container environment, and have the epiphany that it’s necessary to understand a lot of terminology and technology behind the scenes. Worse, many of the following terms are used interchangeably… often causing quite a bit of confusion for newcomers.

  • Container
  • Image
  • Container Image
  • Image Layer
  • Registry
  • Repository
  • Tag
  • Base Image
  • Platform Image
  • Layer

Understanding the terminology laid out in this technical dictionary will provide you a deeper understanding of the underlying technologies. This will help you and your teams speak the same language and also provide insight into how to better architect your container environment for the goals you have. As an industry and wider community, this deeper understanding will enable us to build new architectures and solutions. Note, this technical dictionary assumes that the reader already has an understanding of how to run containers. If you need a primer, try starting with  A Practical Introduction to Docker Containers on the Red Hat Developer Blog.

Continue reading “A Practical Introduction to Container Terminology”

Share