containers

Integration of external application details (Part 3)

Integration of external application details (Part 3)

In Part 2 of this series, we took a high-level view of the common architectural elements that determine how your integration becomes the key to transforming your customer experience.

I laid out how I’ve approached the use case and how I’ve used successful customer portfolio solutions as the basis for researching a generic architectural blueprint. The only thing left to cover was the order in which you’ll be led through the blueprint details.

This article takes you deeper to cover details pertaining to the specific elements (mobile and web application deployments) of the generic architectural overview.

Continue reading “Integration of external application details (Part 3)”

Share
Building .NET Core container images using S2I

Building .NET Core container images using S2I

Red Hat OpenShift implements .NET Core support via a source-to-image (S2I) builder. In this article, we’ll take a closer look at how you can use that builder directly. Using S2I, you can build .NET Core application images without having to write custom build scripts or Dockerfiles. This can be useful on your development machine or as part of a CI/CD pipeline.

Continue reading “Building .NET Core container images using S2I”

Share
Red Hat Container Development Kit 3.7 now available

Red Hat Container Development Kit 3.7 now available

We are pleased to announce the availability of the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) 3.7. CDK 3.7 is based on Minishift v1.27.0, a command-line tool to quickly provision an OpenShift and Kubernetes cluster on your local machine for developing cloud- and container-based applications. The CDK also includes OpenShift Container Platform v3.11.14. You can use the CDK on Windows, macOS, or Linux.

Here’s a summary of the new features in CDK 3.7:

Continue reading “Red Hat Container Development Kit 3.7 now available”

Share
Announcing .NET Core 2.2 for Red Hat Platforms

Announcing .NET Core 2.2 for Red Hat Platforms

We are very excited to announce the general availability of .NET Core 2.2 for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and OpenShift platforms! This general availability is in lock-step with Microsoft’s release yesterday.

.NET Core is the open-source, cross-platform .NET platform for building microservices. .NET Core is designed to provide the best performance at scale for applications that use microservices and containers. Libraries can be shared with other .NET platforms, such as .NET Framework (Windows) and Xamarin (mobile applications). With .NET Core you have the flexibility of building and deploying applications on Red Hat Enterprise Linux or in containers. Your container-based applications and microservices can easily be deployed to your choice of public or private clouds using Red Hat OpenShift. All of the features of OpenShift and Kubernetes for cloud deployments are available to you.

.NET Core 2.2 continues to broaden its support and tools for application development in an open source environment. The latest version of .NET Core includes the following improvements:

Continue reading “Announcing .NET Core 2.2 for Red Hat Platforms”

Share
Quickly try Red Hat Process Automation Manager in your cloud

Quickly try Red Hat Process Automation Manager in your cloud

It’s been some time since I last talked with you about putting JBoss BPM Suite (now called Red Hat Process Automation Manager) into your cloud, and with the new release, it’s time to talk AppDev in the cloud again.

It’s time to update the story and see how to put Red Hat Process Automation Manager in your cloud so you are set up with a standard configuration to start your first business rules project.

With the easy installation demo project described below, you can leverage process automation tooling through the business central web console running containerized on any Red Hat OpenShift.

Let’s take a closer look at how this works.

Continue reading “Quickly try Red Hat Process Automation Manager in your cloud”

Share
Managing containerized system services with Podman

Managing containerized system services with Podman

In this article, I discuss containers, but look at them from another angle. We usually refer to containers as the best technology for developing new cloud-native applications and orchestrating them with something like Kubernetes. Looking back at the origins of containers, we’ve mostly forgotten that containers were born for simplifying application distribution on standalone systems.

In this article, we’ll talk about the use of containers as the perfect medium for installing applications and services on a Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) system. Using containers doesn’t have to be complicated, I’ll show how to run MariaDB, Apache HTTPD, and WordPress in containers, while managing those containers like any other service, through systemd and systemctl.

Additionally, we’ll explore Podman, which Red Hat has developed jointly with the Fedora community. If you don’t know what Podman is yet, see my previous article, Intro to Podman (Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.6) and Tom Sweeney’s Containers without daemons: Podman and Buildah available in RHEL 7.6 and RHEL 8 Beta.

Continue reading “Managing containerized system services with Podman”

Share
Containers without daemons: Podman and Buildah available in RHEL 7.6 and RHEL 8 Beta

Containers without daemons: Podman and Buildah available in RHEL 7.6 and RHEL 8 Beta

Kubernetes installations can be complex with multiple runtime dependencies and runtime engines. CRI-O was created to provide a lightweight runtime for Kubernetes which adds an abstraction layer between the cluster and the runtime that allows for various OCI runtime technologies. However you still have the problem of depending on daemon(s) in your cluster for builds – I.e. if you are using the cluster for builds you still need a Docker daemon.

Enter Buildah. Buildah allows you to have a Kubernetes cluster without any Docker daemon for both runtime and builds. Excellent. But what if things go wrong? What if you want to do troubleshooting or debugging of containers in your cluster? Buildah isn’t really built for that, what you need is a client tool for working with containers and the one that comes to mind is Docker CLI – but then you’re back to using the daemon.

This is where Podman steps in. Podman allows you to do all of the Docker commands without the daemon dependency. To see examples of Podman replacing the docker command, see Alessandro Arrichiello’s Intro to Podman and Doug Tidwell’s Podman—The next generation of Linux container tools.

Continue reading “Containers without daemons: Podman and Buildah available in RHEL 7.6 and RHEL 8 Beta”

Share
How to install Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift

How to install Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift

In this article, I will show how to install and manage Red Hat Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform. Ansible Tower helps you scale IT automation, manage complex deployments, and improve productivity. You can centralize and control your IT infrastructure with a visual dashboard, and it provides role-based access control, job scheduling, integrated notifications, graphical inventory management, and more.

As you may know, Ansible Tower 3.3, the latest release of this automation platform, was released a few weeks ago and added new features. From the release notes you’ll see that Ansible Tower 3.3 added support for a container-based installation on top of OpenShift

In this blog, we’ll see how easy it is to set up Ansible Tower 3.3 on OpenShift and have it running as a container in just a few minutes.

Continue reading “How to install Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift”

Share
EventFlow: Event-driven microservices on OpenShift (Part 1)

EventFlow: Event-driven microservices on OpenShift (Part 1)

This post is the first in a series of three related posts that describes a lightweight cloud-native distributed microservices framework we have created called EventFlow. EventFlow can be used to develop streaming applications that can process CloudEvents, which are an effort to standardize upon a data format for exchanging information about events generated by cloud platforms.

The EventFlow platform was created to specifically target the Kubernetes/OpenShift platforms, and it models event-processing applications as a connected flow or stream of components. The development of these components can be facilitated through the use of a simple SDK library, or they can be created as Docker images that can be configured using environment variables to attach to Kafka topics and process event data directly.

Continue reading “EventFlow: Event-driven microservices on OpenShift (Part 1)”

Share