containers

Serverless applications made faster and simpler with OpenShift Serverless GA

Serverless applications made faster and simpler with OpenShift Serverless GA

Red Hat OpenShift Serverless delivers Kubernetes-native, event-driven primitives for microservices, containers, and compatible Function-as-a-Service (FaaS) implementations. OpenShft Serverless provides out-of-the-box traffic routing and security capabilities. This offering combines Red Hat Operators, Knative, and Red Hat OpenShift. Combined, these tools allow stateless and serverless workloads to run across OpenShift deployments on private, public, hybrid, or multi-cloud environments with automated operations.

OpenShift Serverless is now generally available. It enables developers to focus purely on building next-generation applications with a wide choice of languages, frameworks, development environments, and other tools for writing and deploying business-differentiating applications.

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JBoss EAP 7.3 brings new packaging capabilities

JBoss EAP 7.3 brings new packaging capabilities

In addition to a huge set of new features and improvements, the release of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.3 provides innovative packaging capabilities. In this article, I will highlight two of these new capabilities and demonstrate their benefits: splitting images into build versus runtimes, and configuration trimming with Galleon.

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Migrating a Spring Boot microservices application to Quarkus

Migrating a Spring Boot microservices application to Quarkus

While Spring Boot has long been the de-facto framework for developing container-based applications in Java, the performance benefits of a Kubernetes-native framework are hard to ignore. In this article, I will show you how to quickly migrate a Spring Boot microservices application to Quarkus. Once the migration is complete, we’ll test the application and compare startup times between the original Spring Boot application and the new Quarkus app.

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Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2: New tools to speed Kubernetes development

Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2: New tools to speed Kubernetes development

We are pleased to announce the release of Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.0. Based on Eclipse Che, its upstream project CodeReady Workspaces is a Red Hat OpenShift-native developer environment enabling cloud-native development for developer teams.

CodeReady Workspaces 2.0 is available now on OpenShift 3.11 and OpenShift 4.x.

This new version introduces:

  • Kubernetes-native developer sandboxes on OpenShift: Bring your Kubernetes application into your development environment, allowing you to code, build, test, and run as in production.
  • Integrated OpenShift experience: OpenShift plugin and integration into the OpenShift 4 Developer Console.
  • New editor and Visual Studio (VS) Code extensions compatibility: New browser-based editor, providing a fast desktop-like experience and compatibility with Visual Studio Code extensions.
  • Devfile, developer environment as code: Developer environments are codified with a devfile making them consistent, repeatable, and reproducible.
  • Centrally hosted on OpenShift with AirGap: Deploy on your OpenShift cluster, behind your firewall. AirGap capabilities. Easier to monitor and administer.

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4 container usage takeaways from the 2019 Sysdig report

4 container usage takeaways from the 2019 Sysdig report

You probably already knew that most of the containers created by developers are disposable, but did you realize that half of them are only around for less than five minutes? That and other fascinating details are available in the latest annual container report from Sysdig, a container security and orchestration vendor.

This is the company’s third such report. The results are obtained from their own instrumentation collected from a five-day period last month of the more than 2 million containers used by their own customers. This means the results could be somewhat skewed toward more experienced container developers.

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Verifying signatures of Red Hat container images

Verifying signatures of Red Hat container images

Security-conscious organizations are accustomed to using digital signatures to validate application content from the Internet. A common example is RPM package signing. Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) validates signatures of RPM packages by default.

In the container world, a similar paradigm should be adhered to. In fact, all container images from Red Hat have been digitally signed and have been for several years. Many users are not aware of this because early container tooling was not designed to support digital signatures.

In this article, I’ll demonstrate how to configure a container engine to validate signatures of container images from the Red Hat registries for increased security of your containerized applications.

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3 steps toward improving container security

3 steps toward improving container security

As developers increasingly make use of containers, securing them becomes more and more important. Gartner has named container security one of its top 10 concerns for this year in this report, which isn’t surprising given their popularity in producing lightweight and reusable code and lowering app dev costs.

In this article, I’ll look at the three basic steps involved in container security: securing the build environment, securing the underlying container hosts, and securing the actual content that runs inside each container. To be successful at mastering container security means paying attention to all three of these elements.

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Autowire MicroProfile into Spring with Quarkus

Autowire MicroProfile into Spring with Quarkus

Eclipse MicroProfile and Spring Boot are often thought of as separate and distinct APIs when developing Java microservices. Developers default to their mental muscle memory by leveraging the APIs that they use on a daily basis. Learning new frameworks and runtimes can be a significant time investment. This article aims to ease the introduction to some popular MicroProfile APIs for Spring developers by enabling them to utilize the Spring APIs they already know while benefiting from significant new capabilities offered by Quarkus.

More specifically, this article covers the scope and details of the Spring APIs supported by Quarkus so Spring developers have a grasp of the foundation they can build on with MicroProfile APIs. The article then covers MicroProfile APIs that Spring developers will find helpful in the development of microservices. Only a subset of MicroProfile is covered.

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