PowerShell on RHEL in One Minute

While not specifically related to .NET on Linux, PowerShell on Linux is available and — let’s face it — if you’re a Windows developer you’re using PowerShell.

If you’re not using PowerShell, now is the time to start. While bash is the traditional Linux shell, PowerShell gives you the advantage of objects. In PowerShell, everything is an object, with properties you can directly access. It’s also a very powerful object-oriented scripting language, with classes and methods, much like any OOP language.

Add to that the fact that you now have one scripting language for any platform, and PowerShell may (should in my not-so-humble opinion) become your shell and scripting language of choice.

(Hint: If you aren’t using PowerShell, here is your opportunity to turn your coding skills up to 11.)

Continue reading “PowerShell on RHEL in One Minute”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 

Creating your first ASP.NET MVC web site on RHEL

Follow this blog post, and within minutes you will have an ASP.NET MVC website running on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). Yes, I’m talking to you, Windows .NET developer; you’re about to double your OS skillset. Let’s do this.

Continue reading “Creating your first ASP.NET MVC web site on RHEL”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 

Take advantage of your Red Hat Developers membership and download RHEL today at no cost.

Welcome to Red Hat Enterprise Linux, MSBuild, a build tool for .NET Core CLI!

Microsoft announced the first “alpha” release of the new MSBuild-based .NET Core tools. .NET Core SDK which can be downloaded from the Red Hat Developer Program site consists of .NET Core Runtime and .NET Core command line tools (.NET Core CLI). (Reminder – you must have a Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscription first.  If you don’t, you can go here for a no-cost subscription.) The MSBuild tool is included in .NET Core 1.0 preview 3 (not in the latest release .NET Core 1.1). The version number is something complicated because .NET CLI is not GA but still under preview. The MSBuild tool can be used with both .NET Core 1.0 and .NET Core 1.1 runtimes. RHEL is not listed in the .NET Core SDK 1.0 Preview 3 download list. But you can try MSBuild with the .NET Core CLI daily build.

NOTE: Red Hat has just released .NET Core 1.1. However, .NET Core 1.1 doesn’t include the MSBuild tool, you can try MSBuild following this blog.

Continue reading “Welcome to Red Hat Enterprise Linux, MSBuild, a build tool for .NET Core CLI!”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 

Take advantage of your Red Hat Developers membership and download RHEL today at no cost.

Red Hat Logo

Architectural Cross-Cutting Concerns of Cloud Native Applications

Several organizations are wondering (and sometimes struggling on) how to port their current workloads to cloud environments.

Continue reading “Architectural Cross-Cutting Concerns of Cloud Native Applications”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 


For more information about Red Hat OpenShift and other related topics, visit: OpenShift, OpenShift Online.

Observations on Porting from .NET Framework to .NET Core

This article is written as opinion. The opinions expressed within are solely those of the author, and do not represent the views of Red Hat.


You’ve heard that .NET has gone open source. You’ve also heard that it has gone cross-platform. And you’ve even heard that Red Hat is shipping a supported version of .NET on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. So maybe you are thinking to yourself, “wow, this is fantastic! I’m going to copy these EXEs and DLLs of my .NET application over to my Red Hat machine and run them!”

Well, unfortunately, it’s not going to be quite that easy. At least not today.

First and foremost, the open source version of .NET is called “.NET Core.” It is available for many platforms, including Windows and Linux. Those .NET projects and applications that you already have running, however, were built on and for .NET Framework. And .NET Framework and .NET Core are not the same thing; they are more like siblings, which also implies that one is not a subset or child of the other.

“Well, then, what’s the point?!”

The good news is that while they are siblings, they do look a lot alike. Although they’re not identical twins, you’ll definitely recognize them as being from the same immediate family. As such, it is possible to port many existing .NET Framework applications to .NET Core.

“How hard is it to port something?”

Continue reading “Observations on Porting from .NET Framework to .NET Core”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 

Red Hat adds .NET Core 1.1 to Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform

Today, we’re pleased to announce that .NET Core 1.1 is now available and supported on Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform. This second .NET Core release shows Red Hat’s continued commitment to opening up platform choices for enterprises seeking to use .NET in Linux environments, including container-centric operating systems. We’re also pleased to lead the way in the Linux world yet again with our support for .NET, as Red Hat Enterprise Linux is the only commercial Linux distribution to feature full, enterprise-grade support for .NET Core.

New application development highlights in Microsoft’s .NET Core 1.1 are:

Continue reading “Red Hat adds .NET Core 1.1 to Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 

Working with OpenShift secrets for ASP.NET Core

If you want to use secret configuration which you don’t want to store the code repository during developing ASP.NET Core app, what will you do? ASP.NET Core provides Secret Manager tool. Then how about developing on OpenShift? I’d like to talk about Secret Manager tool and working OpenShift secrets for ASP.NET Core in this blog.

Continue reading “Working with OpenShift secrets for ASP.NET Core”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 


For more information about Red Hat OpenShift and other related topics, visit: OpenShift, OpenShift Online.

P/Invoke in .NET Core on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

P/Invoke(Platform Invocation Service) is one of the features of CLI (Common Language Interface) on .NET Framework. P/Invoke enables managed code to call a native function in DLL (Dynamic Link Library). It’s a powerful tool for .NET Framework to execute existing C-style functions easily. .NET Core also has a P/Invoke feature and it means we can call a native function in .so file (Linux) and . file (Max OSX). I will show you the short example P/Invoke in .NET Core on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL).

Here is the simple P/Invoke sample using read function in libc. It is the same way as .NET Framework on Windows to import native function.

Continue reading “P/Invoke in .NET Core on Red Hat Enterprise Linux”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 

Take advantage of your Red Hat Developers membership and download RHEL today at no cost.

Debugging .NET on Red Hat Enterprise Linux from Visual Studio

Being able to edit your C# (or F# for that matter) code on your Linux VM from Visual Studio in Windows is pretty great. As a Windows developer, you’re able to work in an environment you know and trust while still being able to experiment — and hopefully produce production code — in Linux, where you may not be quite up to speed. Yet. Visual Studio, that familiar, productive and helpful IDE, is at your fingertips even though your code is far away in a Linux VM.

(Okay, not that far; the VM is running on the Red Hat Container Development Kit on your Windows box, but let’s call that last sentence “poetic license” and move on.)

Editing isn’t enough; we all know that. Since code sometimes has bugs (cough), we need to debug our code. Sure, we can write to a log and check inputs and outputs against expected results, but even that’s not enough. Any kinds of tests, even automated tests (you are using TDD, right? Right?) only confirm the existence — as rare as they are in your code — of defects. Finding the cause of a defect, ahhhh … there’s the rub. If only we could run interactive debugging from within Visual Studio against our compiled C# code running in our RHEL VM.

Well guess what; We can. It’s called “offroad debugging” and it’s not difficult to set up and — this is a technical term — it’s very cool. It’s a bit of work to get set up — not difficult, just several steps — but after doing it one time it becomes very easy for future projects. And never forget; if you get stuck, you can reach me on Twitter (@DonSchenck) or email me at dschenck@redhat.com.

Continue reading “Debugging .NET on Red Hat Enterprise Linux from Visual Studio”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 

Take advantage of your Red Hat Developers membership and download RHEL today at no cost.

How to install and configure Jenkins to build .NET apps on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

In the process of writing my posts (#1 and #2) on .NET Core and RHEL, it was made clear to me by several friends that I had neglected to use the de facto standard for continuous integration on Linux, Jenkins. Always happy to try out new (to me) tools, I settled in for what I was assured would be a simple configuration to test out my previous work in this bastion of automation.

What is Jenkins?

The first order of business was to understand the difference between Jenkins and TeamCity, another popular CI platform. After 20 minutes of reading, I discovered the following crucial differences:

  • Jenkins has been around longer (though not always under the Jenkins moniker).
  • Jenkins is open source.
  • There are many plugins for Jenkins.

Other than these three things, any noteworthy differences I found seemed to ultimately boil down to personal preference. Even so, with my research out of the way, it was off to the races!

Continue reading “How to install and configure Jenkins to build .NET apps on Red Hat Enterprise Linux”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 

Take advantage of your Red Hat Developers membership and download RHEL today at no cost.