From Java to .NET Core. Part 1

There was a time when the word “.NET” was virtually synonymous with bloat, vendor lock-in, and Windows. .NET Core is the exact opposite. It’s blazingly fast. It’s open source under a permissive license (Mostly MIT, some parts Apache-2.0). Unlike some other open-source platforms, .NET Core’s Contributor License Agreement does not grant exclusive privileges to a single corporation. .NET Core is cross-platform, allowing you to target Windows, Mac, Docker, and many flavors of Linux. My favorite resource for getting started with .NET core is Don Schenck’s free book. This post, I hope, can serve as an addendum specifically for Java developers exploring .NET’s flagship language, C#. While C# borrows much from Java, there are important differences to be aware of. Fortunately, some of them are for the better. In this series of posts, I’ll go over a few of the most prominent differences.

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O’Reilly Authors are Heading to Summit – microservices, raspberry pi hacks, .NET and more.

Red Hat Summit is just around the corner in Boston and we are preparing just a few of the many Red Hat authors for their book signings.  We’ve given them 6 steps to signing books:

  • Step 1: Get books ordered.
  • Step 2: Get to Boston.
  • Step 3: Bring a marker.
  • Step 4: Bring a spare marker.
  • Step 5: Show up at the right time.
  • Step 6: Enjoy sharing your work with attendees!

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Creating Your First .NET Program on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Sometimes things are really easy. This is one of those cases. There are only six steps to creating and running your first .NET program on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL).

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Sharing between Windows 10 and your VM

If you’re are anything like me, you find the easiest — yet still best — way to get things done. After all, life is too short to write programs using Edlin, so give me Visual Studio Code (VS Code). So, what’s an easy way for a Windows .NET developer to write code for Linux?

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Versions in Versions in Versions, AKA The .NET Core Russian Doll

Version One Point What?

Ever wonder what version of .NET Core you are running?

Well, that’s simple enough to figure out; simply drop to the command line and type dotnet. You’ll see something like this:

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Edit, Compile and Debug .NET on Linux using VS Code

One of the best features of Visual Studio is the ability to launch and debug an application from within the IDE. This is not an uncommon feature nowadays. When running .NET on Linux, however, you can’t use Visual Studio as your IDE. What to do?

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PowerShell on RHEL in One Minute

While not specifically related to .NET on Linux, PowerShell on Linux is available and — let’s face it — if you’re a Windows developer you’re using PowerShell.

If you’re not using PowerShell, now is the time to start. While bash is the traditional Linux shell, PowerShell gives you the advantage of objects. In PowerShell, everything is an object, with properties you can directly access. It’s also a very powerful object-oriented scripting language, with classes and methods, much like any OOP language.

Add to that the fact that you now have one scripting language for any platform, and PowerShell may (should in my not-so-humble opinion) become your shell and scripting language of choice.

(Hint: If you aren’t using PowerShell, here is your opportunity to turn your coding skills up to 11.)

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Creating your first ASP.NET MVC web site on RHEL

Follow this blog post, and within minutes you will have an ASP.NET MVC website running on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). Yes, I’m talking to you, Windows .NET developer; you’re about to double your OS skillset. Let’s do this.

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Welcome to Red Hat Enterprise Linux, MSBuild, a build tool for .NET Core CLI!

Microsoft announced the first “alpha” release of the new MSBuild-based .NET Core tools. .NET Core SDK which can be downloaded from the Red Hat Developer Program site consists of .NET Core Runtime and .NET Core command line tools (.NET Core CLI). (Reminder – you must have a Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscription first.  If you don’t, you can go here for a no-cost subscription.) The MSBuild tool is included in .NET Core 1.0 preview 3 (not in the latest release .NET Core 1.1). The version number is something complicated because .NET CLI is not GA but still under preview. The MSBuild tool can be used with both .NET Core 1.0 and .NET Core 1.1 runtimes. RHEL is not listed in the .NET Core SDK 1.0 Preview 3 download list. But you can try MSBuild with the .NET Core CLI daily build.

NOTE: Red Hat has just released .NET Core 1.1. However, .NET Core 1.1 doesn’t include the MSBuild tool, you can try MSBuild following this blog.

Continue reading “Welcome to Red Hat Enterprise Linux, MSBuild, a build tool for .NET Core CLI!”


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