DevOps

Persistent storage in action: Understanding Red Hat OpenShift’s persistent volume framework

Persistent storage in action: Understanding Red Hat OpenShift’s persistent volume framework

Red Hat OpenShift is an enterprise-ready Kubernetes platform that provides a number of different models you can use to deploy an application. OpenShift 4.x uses Operators to deploy Kubernetes-native applications. It also supports Helm and traditional template-based deployments. Whatever deployment method you choose, it will be deployed as a wrapper to one or more existing OpenShift resources. Examples include BuildConfig, DeploymentConfig, and ImageStream.

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Let’s collaborate! Take the 2020 Red Hat OpenShift Developer Survey now

Let’s collaborate! Take the 2020 Red Hat OpenShift Developer Survey now

We are always looking for ways to understand better how developers create, build, manage, test, and deploy applications on and for Red Hat OpenShift. An important part of that effort is the annual OpenShift Developer Survey, which we’ve just released for 2020.

Keep reading to learn more about the survey, including highlights of the 2019 survey results and what to expect from the survey this year. We also invite you to participate in our OpenShift developer experience office hours and one-to-one feedback sessions for our developer community and customers.

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Building modern CI/CD workflows for serverless applications with Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines and Argo CD, Part 2

Building modern CI/CD workflows for serverless applications with Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines and Argo CD, Part 2

In the first half of this article, I introduced Tekton as a framework for cloud-native CI/CD pipelines, and Argo CD as its perfect partner for GitOps on Red Hat OpenShift. Our example for the demonstration is a Knative service that deploys and serves a Quarkus application. Our goal is to develop a complete continuous integration and delivery process, which begins when a commit is initiated in the application’s GitHub repository and ends with the new application version deployed in the development, staging, and production environments.

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Static analysis with KubeAudit for Red Hat OpenShift

Static analysis with KubeAudit for Red Hat OpenShift

In this article, we introduce a new utility for developers who want to ensure that their code transitions cleanly from upstream Kubernetes to Red Hat OpenShift. OpenShiftKubeAudit (KubeAudit) is a static analyzer that semantically checks a user’s code for known incompatibilities so you can fix them before bringing the code into OpenShift. KubeAudit is also simple to use and easy to extend.

Running an audit

This being the first release, KubeAudit currently offers only a handful of audits, but they’re easy to write. We’re looking for feedback and additional use cases from the community to help make the tool more comprehensive.

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Kubernetes integration and more in odo 2.0

Kubernetes integration and more in odo 2.0

Odo is a developer-focused command-line interface (CLI) for OpenShift and Kubernetes. This article introduces highlights of the odo 2.0 release, which now integrates with Kubernetes. Additional highlights include the new default deployment method in odo 2.0, which uses devfiles for rapid, iterative development. We’ve also moved Operator deployment out of experimental mode, so you can easily deploy Operator-backed services from the odo command line.

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Command-line cluster management with Red Hat OpenShift’s new web terminal (tech preview)

Command-line cluster management with Red Hat OpenShift’s new web terminal (tech preview)

Red Hat OpenShift‘s web console simplifies many development and deployment chores to just a few clicks, but sometimes you need a command-line interface (CLI) to get things done on a cluster. Whether you’re learning by cut-and-paste in a tutorial or troubleshooting a deep bug in production (also often done by cut-and-paste), you’ll likely need to enter at least a line or two at a command prompt.

Starting with version 4.5.3, OpenShift users can try out a tech preview of the new Web Terminal Operator. The new OpenShift web terminal brings indispensable command-line tools right to the web console, and its Linux environment runs in a pod deployed on your OpenShift cluster. The web terminal eliminates the need to install software and configure connections and authentication for your local terminal. It also makes it easier to use OpenShift on devices like tablets and mobile phones, which might lack a native terminal.

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Building modern CI/CD workflows for serverless applications with Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines and Argo CD, Part 1

Building modern CI/CD workflows for serverless applications with Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines and Argo CD, Part 1

A recent article, The present and future of CI/CD with GitOps on Red Hat OpenShift, proposed Tekton as a framework for cloud-native CI/CD pipelines, and Argo CD as its perfect partner for GitOps. GitOps practices support continuous delivery in hybrid, multi-cluster Kubernetes environments.

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Migrating from Fabric8 Maven Plugin to Eclipse JKube 1.0.0

Migrating from Fabric8 Maven Plugin to Eclipse JKube 1.0.0

The recent release of Eclipse JKube 1.0.0 means that the Fabric8 Maven Plugin is no longer supported. If you are currently using the Fabric8 Maven Plugin, this article provides instructions for migrating to JKube instead. I will also explain the relationship between Eclipse JKube and the Fabric8 Maven Plugin (they’re the same thing) and introduce the highlights of the new Eclipse JKube 1.0.0 release. These migration instructions are for developers working on the Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift platforms.

Eclipse JKube is the Fabric8 Maven Plugin

Eclipse JKube and the Fabric8 Maven Plugin are one and the same. Eclipse JKube was first released in 2014 under the name of Fabric8 Maven Plugin. The development team changed the name when we pre-released Eclipse JKube 0.1.0 in December 2019. For more about the name change, see my recent introduction to Eclipse JKube. This article focuses on the migration path to JKube 1.0.0.

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How to switch Red Hat OpenShift Virtualization from hardware virtualization to software emulation

How to switch Red Hat OpenShift Virtualization from hardware virtualization to software emulation

DISCLAIMER: The following setup is not supported by Red Hat, even for dev/test/sandbox environments. It is only meant to demonstrate the technical possibilities. See Configuring your cluster for OpenShift Virtualization for information. In addition, Tiny Code Generator (TCG) is not supported or tested by Red Hat.

OpenShift Virtualization is a feature of Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (OCP) and OpenShift Kubernetes Engine that allows you to run and manage virtual machine workloads alongside container workloads. Based on the open source project KubeVirt, the goal of OpenShift Virtualization is to help enterprises move from a VM-based infrastructure to a Kubernetes-and-container-based stack, one application at a time.

In my previous article, I showed you how to set up and enable OpenShift Virtualization running on Amazon Web Services Elastic Compute Cloud (AWS EC2). In that article, I noted that OpenShift Virtualization looks for hardware virtualization by default, which requires a bare-metal server instance. If you are running OpenShift on AWS EC2, as I do, then you have to enable software emulation over the default hardware virtualization. Otherwise, you need a bare-metal instance from the public cloud provider or a pure bare-metal solution.

In this article, I show you how to switch OpenShift Virtualization from its default of hardware virtualization to QEMU-based software emulation. You will then be able to start and operate a virtual machine through OpenShift Virtualization, even in a non-bare metal instance such as AWS EC2.

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5 tips for developing Kubernetes Operators with the new Operator SDK

5 tips for developing Kubernetes Operators with the new Operator SDK

Kubernetes Operators are all the rage this season, and the fame is well deserved. Operators are evolving from being used primarily by technical-infrastructure gurus to becoming more mainstream, Kubernetes-native tools for managing complex applications. Kubernetes Operators today are important for cluster administrators and ISV providers, and also for custom applications developed in house. They provide the base for a standardized operational model that is similar to what cloud providers offer. Operators also open the door to fully portable workloads and services on Kubernetes.

The new Kubernetes Operator Framework is an open source toolkit that lets you manage Kubernetes Operators in an effective, automated, and scalable way. The Operator Framework consists of three components: the Operator SDK, the Operator Lifecycle Manager, and OperatorHub. In this article, I introduce tips and tricks for working with the Operator SDK. The Operator SDK 1.0.0 release shipped in mid-August, so it’s a great time to have a look at it.

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