Serverless

Building modern CI/CD workflows for serverless applications with Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines and Argo CD, Part 1

Building modern CI/CD workflows for serverless applications with Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines and Argo CD, Part 1

A recent article, The present and future of CI/CD with GitOps on Red Hat OpenShift, proposed Tekton as a framework for cloud-native CI/CD pipelines, and Argo CD as its perfect partner for GitOps. GitOps practices support continuous delivery in hybrid, multi-cluster Kubernetes environments.

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Call an existing REST service with Apache Camel K

Call an existing REST service with Apache Camel K

With the release of Apache Camel K, it is possible to create and deploy integrations with existing applications that are quicker and more lightweight than ever. In many cases, calling an existing REST endpoint is the best way to connect a new system to an existing one. Take the example of a cafe serving coffee. What happens when the cafe wants to allow customers to use a delivery service like GrubHub? You would only need to introduce a single Camel K integration to connect the cafe and GrubHub systems.

In this article, I will show you how to create a Camel K integration that calls an existing REST service and uses its existing data format. For the data format, I have a Maven project configured with Java objects. Ideally, you would have this packaged and available in a Nexus repository. For the purpose of my demonstration, I utilized JitPack, which lets me have my dependency available in a repository directly from my GitHub code. See the GitHub repository associated with this demo for the data format code and directions for getting it into JitPack.

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Kubernetes: The evolution of distributed systems

Kubernetes: The evolution of distributed systems

DevNation Tech Talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions plus code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about Kubernetes and distributed systems from Bilgin Ibryam and Burr Sutter.

Cloud-native applications of the future will consist of hybrid workloads: stateful applications, batch jobs, stateless microservices, and functions (plus maybe something else) wrapped as Linux containers and deployed via Kubernetes on any cloud. Functions and the so-called serverless computing model are the latest evolution of what started as service-oriented architecture years ago. But is this the last step of the application architecture evolution and is it here to stay?

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Deploying serverless Node.js applications on Red Hat OpenShift, Part 1

Deploying serverless Node.js applications on Red Hat OpenShift, Part 1

Red Hat OpenShift Serverless recently became GA, and with it came new options for application deployment. This article introduces one of those new options, Knative Serving. I provide an overview of OpenShift Serverless and Knative Serving, then show you how to deploy a Node.js application as a Knative Serving service.

What is OpenShift Serverless?

According to the OpenShift Serverless GA release:

OpenShift Serverless enables developers to build what they want, when they want, with whatever tools and languages they need. Developers can quickly get their applications up and deployed using serverless compute, and they won’t have to build and maintain larger container images to do so.

OpenShift Serverless is based on the Knative open source Kubernetes serverless project. While it has a few different parts, we will focus on deploying a serverless Node.js application as a Knative Serving service.

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Keeping Kubernetes secrets secret

Keeping Kubernetes secrets secret

DevNation Tech Talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions plus code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn how to manage Kubernetes secrets from Alex Soto Bueno and Burr Sutter.

Everyone is talking about microservices and serverless architecture, and how to deploy them using cluster managers like Kubernetes. But, what about the secrets (such as certificates, passwords, SSH, and API keys)? The current trend increases the number of secrets required to run our services. This fact places a new level of maintenance on our security teams.

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Using Spring Cloud Functions with OpenShift Serverless

Using Spring Cloud Functions with OpenShift Serverless

Spring Cloud Functions are yet another interesting option for Java developers when building serverless applications. You have already seen how to build and run applications for Red Hat OpenShift Serverless using Quarkus, but in this article, we talk about how to use Spring Cloud Functions and walk you through those steps. These steps are similar to running any other Spring Boot application with OpenShift Serverless. One of the benefits of building an open hybrid serverless platform is giving developers a choice of programming languages, tools, frameworks, and portability across any environment to run serverless applications. Beyond that, you want to ensure that the developer experience and overall workflow is intuitive and practical, which is what you will learn here.

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Creating event sources in the OpenShift 4.5 web console

Creating event sources in the OpenShift 4.5 web console

Red Hat OpenShift 4.5 makes it easier than ever to deploy and run event-driven applications that react to real-time information via event notifications. Empowered by OpenShift Serverless, applications come to life through events, scaling up resources as needed (or up to a pre-configured limit), and then scaling back to zero after the resource burst is over.

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Kourier: A lightweight Knative Serving ingress

Kourier: A lightweight Knative Serving ingress

Until recently, Knative Serving used Istio as its default networking component for handling external cluster traffic and service-to-service communication. Istio is a great service mesh solution, but it can add unwanted complexity and resource use to your cluster if you don’t need it.

That’s why we created Kourier: To simplify the ingress side of Knative Serving. Knative recently adopted Kourier, so it is now a part of the Knative family! This article introduces Kourier and gets you started with using it as a simpler, more lightweight way to expose Knative applications to an external network.

Let’s begin with a brief overview of Knative and Knative Serving.

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