Serverless

Containers, Kubernetes, and microservices: Start here

Containers, Kubernetes, and microservices: Start here

Although containers and Kubernetes and microservices seem to come up in every conversation, there’s a big chasm between talking about, demonstrating, and actually using a technology in production. Anyone can discuss containers, many people can demo them, but far fewer are successfully using containers and Kubernetes in a microservices architecture.

Why? There are likely many reasons, but a simple one may be that developers don’t know where to start.

Consider this series of articles your starting point. Relax, read on, and get ready to enter the exciting world of containers, Kubernetes, and microservices.

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Quarkus 0.12.0 released

Quarkus 0.12.0 released

Quarkus, a next-generation Kubernetes native Java framework, was announced in early March, and now Quarkus 0.12.0 has been released and is available from the Maven repository. The quickstarts, guides, and website also have been updated, and 213 issues and PRs are included in this release. That’s quite a few updates, but in particular check out the new metrics, health check, and Kafka guides. Also, this release requires GraalVM 1.0.0-RC13 for Building a Native Executable.

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Quarking Drools: How we turned a 13-year-old Java project into a first-class serverless component

Quarking Drools: How we turned a 13-year-old Java project into a first-class serverless component

“The question of whether a computer can think is no more interesting than the question of whether a submarine can swim.” (Edsger W. Dijkstra)

Rule-based artificial intelligence (AI) is often overlooked, possibly because people think it’s only useful in heavyweight enterprise software products. However, that’s not necessarily true. Simply put, a rule engine is just a piece of software that allows you to separate domain and business-specific constraint from the main application flow. We are part of the team developing and maintaining Drools—the world’s most popular open source rule engine and part of Red Hat—and, in this article, we will describe how we are changing Drools to make it part of the cloud and serverless revolution.

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Introducing Quarkus: a next-generation Kubernetes native Java framework

Introducing Quarkus: a next-generation Kubernetes native Java framework

Java was introduced to the open-source community more than 20 years ago and it still remains popular among developers. In fact, Java has never ranked lower than #2 on the TIOBE Index. Java was born in the mid-1990s and has nearly 20 years of optimizations for running highly dynamic monolithic applications that assumed sole ownership of (virtualized) host CPU and memory. However, we now live in a world dominated by the cloud, mobile, IoT, and open source, where containers, Kubernetes, microservices, reactive, Function-as-a-Service (FaaS), 12-factor, and cloud-native application development can deliver higher levels of productivity and efficiency. As an industry, we need to rethink how Java can be best utilized to address these new deployment environments and application architectures.

We’d like to introduce you to Quarkus and Supersonic Subatomic Java!

Quarkus is a Kubernetes Native Java framework tailored for GraalVM and HotSpot, crafted from best-of-breed Java libraries and standards. The goal of Quarkus is to make Java a leading platform in Kubernetes and serverless environments while offering developers a unified reactive and imperative programming model to optimally address a wider range of distributed application architectures.

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Processing CloudEvents with Eclipse Vert.x

Processing CloudEvents with Eclipse Vert.x

Our connected world is full of events that are triggered or received by different software services. One of the big issues is that event publishers tend to describe events differently and in ways that are mostly incompatible with each other.

To address this, the Serverless Working Group from the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) recently announced version 0.2 of the CloudEvents specification. The specification aims to describe event data in a common, standardized way. To some degree, a CloudEvent is an abstract envelope with some specified attributes that describe a concrete event and its data.

Working with CloudEvents is simple. This article shows how to use the powerful JVM toolkit provided by Vert.x to either generate or receive and process CloudEvents.

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