Securing Fuse 6.3 Fabric Cluster Management Console with SSL/TLS

Introduction

Enabling SSL/TLS in a Fabric is slightly more complex than securing a jetty in a standalone Karaf container. In the following article, we are providing feedback on the overall process. For clarity and simplification, the article will be divided into two parts.

 

Part1: The Management Console

Part2: Securing Web Service:including gateway-http

 

For the purpose of this PoC, the following environment will be used.

Environment

  • Host  fabric1.example.com  (192.168.56.1),  localhost MacOS
  • Host  fabric2.example.com  (192.168.56.101), RHEL 7.2 Virtual Box VM
  • Host  fabric3.example.com  (192.168.56.102), RHEL 7.2 Virtual Box VM

 

With the following components

  • jboss-fuse-6.3.0.redhat-187
  • jdk1.8.0_102

 

Part1: Put the Management Console in HTTPS in a Fuse Fabric 6.3 Cluster.

 

STEP1: Prepare/Generate a valid certificate/Keystore

If you setup a fabric with three ensemble servers, each ensemble server should trust the two others; the most practical approach to do this is to create a certificate authority to sign all the individual certificates. For the purpose of this demo we are creating a self signed certificate with  all the fabricXX.example.com  in the Subject Alternative section.

 

keytool -genkeypair -keyalg RSA -keysize 2048 -sigalg SHA256withRSA -validity 365 -keystore san.demo.jks -storepass Cluster01# -keypass Cluster01# -dname cn=fabric1.example.com -alias demo

-ext SAN=dns:fabric1.example.com,dns:fabric2.example.com,dns:fabric3.example.com

 

This certificate should be populated on the three hosts in the same folder location, for this demo the file is stored in  /shared/fuse/certs/

 

STEP2: Edit the EXTRA_JAVA_OPTS on all hosts.

<

p class=”p1″>vi $FUSE_HOME/bin/setenv

export EXTRA_JAVA_OPTS="-Djavax.net.ssl.trustStore=/shared/fuse/certs/san.demo.jks -Djavax.net.ssl.trustStorePassword=Cluster01# -Djavax.net.ssl.keyStore=/shared/fuse/certs/san.demo.jks -Djavax.net.ssl.keyStorePassword=Cluster01# "

This will make your certs trusted by client code in fuse also. for debugging purpose you can add the options

  -Djavax.net.debug=ssl to have all the exception trace if any during the SSL handshake process.

  -Djava.rmi.server.logCalls=true , to get all RMI Exceptions

STEP3: Start Fuse and create the Fabric

./fuse

JBossFuse:karaf@fabric1> fabric:create --clean --resolver manualip --global-resolver manualip --manual-ip fabric1.example.com --force

Waiting for container: fabric1

It may take a couple of seconds for the container to provision…

You can use the –wait-for-provisioning option, if you want this command to block until the container is provisioned.

JBossFuse:karaf@fabric1> fabric:wait-for-provisioning

SUCCESS

 

JBossFuse:karaf@fabric1> fabric:info

Fabric Release:            1.2.0.redhat-630187
Web Console:               http://fabric1.example.com:8181/hawtio
Rest API:
Git URL:                   http://fabric1.example.com:8181/git/fabric/
Jolokia URL:               http://fabric1.example.com:8181/jolokia
ZooKeeper URI:             fabric1.example.com:2181
Maven Download URI:        http://fabric1.example.com:8181/maven/download/
Maven Upload URI:          http://fabric1.example.com:8181/maven/upload/

From fabric2.example.com and fabric3.example.com, run the fabric join command

JBossFuse:karaf@fabric2>fabric:join --resolver manualip --manual-ip  fabric2.example.com --force  fabric1.example.com:2181
JBossFuse:karaf@fabric3>fabric:join --resolver manualip --manual-ip  fabric3.example.com --force  fabric1.example.com:2181

 

The –resolver –global-resolver and –manual-ip are very important, if they do not match , certificate validation will failed

 

JBossFuse:karaf@fabric1> container-resolver-list

[id]     [resolver]  [local hostname]        [local ip]      [public hostname]  [public ip]  [manual ip]
fabric1  manualip    fabric1.example.com     192.168.56.1                                    fabric1.example.com
fabric2  manualip    fabric2.example.com     192.168.56.101                                  fabric2.example.com
fabric3  manualip    fabric3.example.com     192.168.56.102                                  fabric3.example.com

 

STEP4: Create the secure SSL profile

Create a secure profile ssl

JBossFuse:karaf@root> profile-create --parent default ssl
profile-edit --pid org.ops4j.pax.web/org.osgi.service.http.enabled=false ssl
profile-edit --pid org.ops4j.pax.web/org.osgi.service.http.secure.enabled=true ssl
profile-edit --pid org.ops4j.pax.web/org.osgi.service.http.port.secure='${port:8443,8543}' ssl
profile-edit --pid org.ops4j.pax.web/org.ops4j.pax.web.ssl.keystore='/shared/fuse/certs/san.demo.jks' ssl
profile-edit --pid org.ops4j.pax.web/org.ops4j.pax.web.ssl.password=Cluster01# ssl
profile-edit --pid org.ops4j.pax.web/org.ops4j.pax.web.ssl.keypassword=Cluster01# ssl

Check the created profile
JBossFuse:karaf@fabric1> profile-display ssl

Profile id: ssl

Version   : 1.0

Attributes:

  parents: default

Containers:

Container settings

—————————-

Configuration details

—————————-

PID: org.ops4j.pax.web   org.ops4j.pax.web.ssl.password Cluster01#   org.osgi.service.http.enabled false   org.ops4j.pax.web.ssl.keypassword Cluster01#   org.osgi.service.http.secure.enabled true   org.osgi.service.http.port.secure ${port:8443,8543}   org.ops4j.pax.web.ssl.keystore /shared/fuse/certs/san.demo.jks

Other resources

—————————-

STEP5: Put the fabric in HTTPS

By adding the ssl profile to the fabric1, for example, the fabric turns in https. You can repeat the operation for fabric2 and fabric3.

 

JBossFuse:karaf@fabric1> container-add-profile fabric1 ssl

JBossFuse:karaf@fabric1> container-add-profile fabric2 ssl

JBossFuse:karaf@fabric1> container-add-profile fabric3 ssl

 

JBossFuse:karaf@fabric1> log:tail | grep “Pax Web available”

2016-11-15 11:29:59,802 | INFO  | onfig-1-thread-3 | JettyServerImpl                  | 117 – org.ops4j.pax.web.pax-web-jetty – 4.3.0 | Pax Web available at [0.0.0.0]:[8443]

 

JBossFuse:karaf@fabric1> fabric:info
Fabric Release:                1.2.0.redhat-630187
Web Console:                   https://fabric1.example.com:8443/hawtio
Rest API:
Git URL:                       https://fabric1.example.com:8443/git/fabric/
Jolokia URL:                   https://fabric1.example.com:8443/jolokia
ZooKeeper URI:                 fabric1.example.com:2181
Maven Download URI:            https://fabric1.example.com:8443/maven/download/
Maven Upload URI:              https://fabric1.example.com:8443/maven/upload/

 

console

STEP 6: Creating Child containers

Connections from child containers also need to be trusted (e.g. Maven proxy, communication with fabric ensemble.) To create a child container with the ssl profile follow the following steps:

  • create the child container with ssl profile  container-create-child –profile ssl fabric1 node1
  • edit the child container JVM Options : pass the trustStore file and password
container-edit-jvm-options node1 '-Djavax.net.ssl.trustStore=/shared/fuse/certs/san.demo.jks -Djavax.net.ssl.trustStorePassword=Cluster01#'
  • restart the container 
      container-stop node1

       container-start node1

 

More Information

https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-US/JBoss_Enterprise_Application_Platform/6.3/pdf/Security_Guide/JBoss_Enterprise_Application_Platform-6.3-Security_Guide-en-US.pdf

 


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