Serverless

Design event-driven integrations with Kamelets and Camel K

Design event-driven integrations with Kamelets and Camel K

The Kamelet is a concept introduced near the end of 2020 by Camel K to simplify the design of complex system integrations. If you’re familiar with the Camel ecosystem, you know that Camel offers many components for integrating existing systems. An integration’s granularity is related to its low-level components, however. With Kamelets you can reason at a higher level of abstraction than with Camel alone.

A Kamelet is a document specifying an integration flow. A Kamelet uses Camel components and enterprise integration patterns (EIPs) to describe a system’s behavior. You can reuse a Kamelet abstraction in any integration on top of a Kubernetes cluster. You can use any of Camel’s domain-specific languages (DSLs) to write a Kamelet, but the most natural choice is the YAML DSL. The YAML DSL is designed to specify input and output formats, so any integration developer knows beforehand what kind of data to expect.

A Kamelet also serves as a source or sink of events, making Kamelets the building blocks of an event-driven architecture. Later in the article, I will introduce the concept of source and sink events and how to use them in an event-driven architecture with Kamelets.

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New developer quick starts and more in the Red Hat OpenShift 4.7 web console

New developer quick starts and more in the Red Hat OpenShift 4.7 web console

We are continuing to evolve the developer experience in Red Hat OpenShift 4.7. This article highlights what’s new for developers in the OpenShift 4.7 web console. Keep reading to learn about exciting changes to the topology view, an improved developer catalog experience, new developer quick starts, user interface support for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines and Red Hat OpenShift Serverless, and more.

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Write a Quarkus function in two steps on Red Hat OpenShift Serverless

Write a Quarkus function in two steps on Red Hat OpenShift Serverless

Serverless functions are driving the fast adoption of DevApps development and deployment practices today. To successfully adopt serverless functions, developers must understand how serverless capabilities are specified using a combination of cloud computing, data infrastructure, and function-oriented programming. We also need to consider resource optimization (memory and CPU) and high-performance boot and first-response times in both development and production environments. What if we didn’t have to worry about all of that?

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10 reasons to develop Quarkus applications on Red Hat OpenShift

10 reasons to develop Quarkus applications on Red Hat OpenShift

Combining Quarkus with Red Hat OpenShift provides an ideal environment for creating scalable, fast, and lightweight applications. Quarkus significantly increases developer productivity with tooling, pre-built integrations, application services, and more. This article presents 10 reasons why you should develop your Quarkus applications on OpenShift.

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Create your first serverless function with Red Hat OpenShift Serverless Functions

Create your first serverless function with Red Hat OpenShift Serverless Functions

Serverless is a powerful and popular paradigm where you don’t have to worry about managing and maintaining your application infrastructure. In the serverless context, a function is a single-purpose piece of code created by the developer but run and monitored by the managed infrastructure. A serverless function’s value is its simplicity and swiftness, which can entice even those who don’t consider themselves developers.

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Orchestrate event-driven, distributed services with Serverless Workflow and Kubernetes

Orchestrate event-driven, distributed services with Serverless Workflow and Kubernetes

Serverless workflows have gained renewed interest and usefulness with the rise of serverless architectures. Once seen as centralized and monolithic, they now play a key role in cloud-based event and service orchestration. Until recently, there was no vendor-neutral way to describe service orchestration, so developers were dependent on vendors and vendor implementations. We realized that we needed a common, standards-based language for describing serverless workflows.

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More for developers in the new Red Hat OpenShift 4.6 web console

More for developers in the new Red Hat OpenShift 4.6 web console

Red Hat OpenShift 4.6 streamlines developer onboarding in the OpenShift web console, but that’s not all. This article details improvements and new features in the topology view and introduces OpenShift’s new, form-based approach to creating horizontal pod autoscalers and Helm charts. I also touch on application monitoring improvements and the latest updates for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines, Red Hat OpenShift Serverless, and the Kiali Operator in OpenShift 4.6.

Note: This article presents an overview of what’s new in OpenShift 4.6. See the video at the end of the article for a guide to accessing and using the new features in the OpenShift web console.

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New developer onboarding features in Red Hat OpenShift 4.6

New developer onboarding features in Red Hat OpenShift 4.6

We’ve added new features in the Red Hat OpenShift 4.6 release to help developers get started faster with the OpenShift web console:

  • The default developer perspective is set based on your permissions.
  • The developer perspective includes a guided tour.
  • Quick starts guide you through common user flows.
  • Samples make it easy to deploy new applications on OpenShift.

Keep reading to learn about these new features to improve developer onboarding with the OpenShift web console in OpenShift 4.6.

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Event-driven serverless applications with Camel K

Event-driven serverless applications with Camel K

DevNation Tech Talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions plus code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about event-driven serverless applications and Apache Camel K from Nicola Ferraro, Luca Burgazzoli, and Burr Sutter.

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