Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform

Quickly try Red Hat Decision Manager in your Cloud

Quickly try Red Hat Decision Manager in your Cloud

It’s been some time since I last talked with you about business logic engines and using them in application development cloud architectures. At that time, I showcased running JBoss BRMS in a container on Red Hat OpenShift. This gives you the cloud experience, one that’s portable across private and public clouds, but on your own local laptop using Red Hat Container Development Kit.

The world continues to move forward, a new product has been released which replaced JBoss BRMS with the Red Hat Decision Manager, so now I want to provide a way for you to install this on OpenShift, in the same easy to use demo format.

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How to create an Open Virtual Network distributed gateway router

How to create an Open Virtual Network distributed gateway router

In this article, I discuss external connectivity in Open Virtual Network (OVN), a subproject of Open vSwitch (OVS), using a distributed gateway router.

OVN provides external connectivity in two ways:

  • A logical router with a distributed gateway port, which is referred to as a distributed gateway router in this article
  • A logical gateway router

In this article, you will see how to create a distributed gateway router and an example of how it works.

Creating a distributed gateway router has some advantages over using a logical gateway router for the CMS (cloud management system):

  • It is easier to create a distributed gateway router because the CMS doesn’t need to create a transit logical switch, which is needed for a logical gateway router.
  • A distributed gateway router supports distributed north/south traffic, whereas the logical gateway router is centralized on a single gateway chassis.
  • A distributed gateway router supports high availability.

Note: The CMS can be OpenStack, Red Hat OpenShift, Red Hat Virtualization, or any other system that manages a cloud.

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How to install Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift

How to install Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift

In this article, I will show how to install and manage Red Hat Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform. Ansible Tower helps you scale IT automation, manage complex deployments, and improve productivity. You can centralize and control your IT infrastructure with a visual dashboard, and it provides role-based access control, job scheduling, integrated notifications, graphical inventory management, and more.

As you may know, Ansible Tower 3.3, the latest release of this automation platform, was released a few weeks ago and added new features. From the release notes you’ll see that Ansible Tower 3.3 added support for a container-based installation on top of OpenShift or Kubernetes.

In this blog, we’ll see how easy it is to set up Ansible Tower 3.3 on OpenShift and have it running as a container in just a few minutes.

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Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 2 — Using chained builds

Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 2 — Using chained builds

In the previous post, we took a quick look at a new source-to-image (S2I) builder image designed for building and deploying modern web applications on OpenShift. While the last post was focused on getting your app deployed quickly, this post will look at how to use the S2I image as a “pure” builder image and combine it with an OpenShift chained build.

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Announcing: Thorntail 2.2 General Availability

Announcing: Thorntail 2.2 General Availability

An Introduction to Thorntail

Today Red Hat is making Thorntail 2.2 generally available to Red Hat customers through a subscription to Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR). RHOAR provides application developers with a variety of application runtimes running on the OpenShift Container Platform.

Thorntail is the new name for WildFly Swarm, and bundles everything you need to develop and run Thorntail and MicroProfile applications by packaging server runtime libraries with your application code and running it with java -jar. It speeds up the transition from monoliths to microservices and takes advantage of your existing industry standard Java EE technology experience.

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Deploying MicroProfile apps on Microsoft Azure using the Azure Open Service Broker

Deploying MicroProfile apps on Microsoft Azure using the Azure Open Service Broker

At the recently concluded Microsoft Ignite 2018 conference in Orlando, I had the honor of presenting to a crowd of Java developers and Azure professionals eager to learn how to put their Java skills to work building next-gen apps on Azure. Of course, that meant showcasing the technology coming out of the popular MicroProfile community, in which Red Hat plays a big part (and makes a fully supported, productized MicroProfile implementation through Thorntail, part of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes).

We did a demo too, which is the main topic of this blog post, showing how easy it is to link your Java MicroProfile apps to Azure services through the Open Service Broker for Azure (the open source, Open Service Broker-compatible API server that provisions managed services in the Microsoft Azure public cloud) and OpenShift’s Service Catalog.

Here’s how to reproduce the demo.

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Securing .NET Core on OpenShift using HTTPS

Securing .NET Core on OpenShift using HTTPS

In an effort to improve security, browsers have become stricter in warning users about sites that aren’t properly secured with SSL/TLS. ASP.NET Core 2.1 has improved support for HTTPS. You can read more about these enhancements in Improvements to using HTTPS. In this blog post, we’ll look at how you can add HTTPS to your ASP.NET Core applications deployed on Red Hat OpenShift.

Before we get down to business, let’s recap some OpenShift vocabulary and HTTPS fundamentals. If you are familiar, you can skip over these sections.

OpenShift, pods, services, routes, and S2I

OpenShift is a Kubernetes-based open-source container application platform. A Kubernetes pod is a set of containers that must be deployed on the same host. In most cases, a pod consists of a single container. When we run the same application in several pods, a service does the load balancing across those pods. A route makes a service accessible externally via a hostname.

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Red Hat Container Development Kit 3.6 now available

Red Hat Container Development Kit 3.6 now available

We are pleased to announce the availability of Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) 3.6. CDK 3.6 is based on Minishift 1.24.0, a command-line tool to quickly provision an OpenShift and Kubernetes cluster on your local machine for developing cloud- and container-based applications. You can run CDK/Minishift on Windows, macOS, or Linux.

Today, we are also announcing the availability of Red Hat Developer Studio 12.9 and JBoss Tools 4.9 for Eclipse 2018-09. You can develop cloud/container-based applications with a familiar desktop IDE that has integrated tooling for CDK/Minishift.

Here’s a summary of the new features in CDK 3.6:

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Announcing Red Hat Developer Studio 12.9.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.9.0.Final for Eclipse 2018-09

Announcing Red Hat Developer Studio 12.9.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.9.0.Final for Eclipse 2018-09

Attention desktop IDE users: Red Hat Developer Studio 12.9 and the community edition, JBoss Tools 4.9.0 for Eclipse 2018-09, are now available. You can download the Developer Studio bundled installer, which installs Eclipse 4.9 with all of the JBoss Tools already configured. Or, if you have an existing Eclipse 4.9 (2018-09) installation, you can download the JBoss Tools package.

This article highlights some of the new features in both JBoss Tools and Eclipse Photon, covering WildFly, Spring Boot, Camel, Maven, and many Java-related improvements—including full Java 11 support.

Developer Studio/JBoss Tools provides a desktop IDE with a broad set of tooling covering multiple programming models and frameworks. If you are doing container/cloud development, there is integrated functionality for working with Red Hat OpenShift, Kubernetes, Red Hat Container Development Kit, and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes. For integration projects, there is tooling covering Camel and Red Hat Fuse that can be used in both local and cloud deployments.

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Modern Web Applications on OpenShift: Part 1 – Web apps in two commands

Modern Web Applications on OpenShift: Part 1 – Web apps in two commands

In this multi-part series, we will take a look at how to deploy modern web applications, like React and Angular apps, to Red Hat OpenShift using a new source-to-image (S2I) builder image.  Series overview:

  • Part 1 – how to deploy modern web apps using the fewest steps.
  • Part 2 – how to combine this new S2I image with a current HTTP server image, like NGINX, using an OpenShift chained build for a more production-ready deployment.
  • Part 3 – The last post will show how to run your app’s development server on OpenShift while syncing with your local file system.

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