Using Camel-Undertow component supporting http2 connection

This article would help to configure http2 protocol support for the camel-undertow component.

  • Camel’s undertow component use embedded undertow web-container of version undertow-core:jar:1.4.21. This version also supports the http2 connection.
  • I have used camel version 2.21.0-SNAPSHOT from upstream https://github.com/apache/camel.
  • Also, the curl version to test application using camel-undertow component is 7.53.1. This curl version supports –http2 flag for sending an http2 request.
  • I have also used nghttp to test application from linux terminal. However, this article is not about http2 insights.
  • For http2 details, I found articles [1] and [2] helpful.

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How to customize OpenShift RBAC permissions

Recently I’ve received a question from a customer who would like to restrict user permission in OpenShift Container Platform in order to be compliant with his company’s security policies.

OpenShift has rich and fine-grained RBAC capabilities out of the box, which gives you the possibility to setup exactly who can do actions (verbs in OpenShift word) on every kind of resource.

Before we begin to dive deep into this topic, I have provided links to some resources I think will be of use to help better understand the concepts of roles, roles scope, RoleBinding, groups, etc.

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Flexible Images or Using S2I for Image Configuration

Container images usually come with pre-defined tools or services with minimal or limited possibilities of further configuration. This brought us into a way of thinking of how to provide images that contain reasonable default settings but are, at the same time, easy to extend. And to make it more fun, this would be possible to achieve both on a single Linux host and in an orchestrated OpenShift environment.

Source-to-image (S2I) has been introduced three years ago to allow developers to build containerized applications by simply providing source code as an input. So why couldn’t we use it to make configuration files as an input instead? We can, of course!

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Example of using Ansible to update Container Native Storage

Container Native Storage (CNS) is implemented in OpenShift as pods. These pods are created from a template that is built into OpenShift. After an automated install, we want to make sure we have the latest template, and the latest containers when using the Advanced Installer. While typically this is a multi-step manual process, an Ansible Script makes this a lot simpler.

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Accelerating the development of Node.js using OpenShift

In this blog entry, I want to introduce a “different” way to work with OpenShift. In the typical way to deploy a Pod to OpenShift, we have available a set of very useful objects we have build/image configurations. This takes the pain from us by hiding the details about image construction but, sometimes we just want to see some code running in the cloud. Or we want to see if our service/application is able to interact with nearby services or we have some code but we don’t want to use a git repo just yet. To solve that problem, I will show the concept of InitContainers, and how by being a little bit creative we achieve some cool stuff like deploying our code inside a running container.

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Developing .NET Core 2.0 Web Applications on OpenShift

Today we’re going to create a .NET Core 2.0 Web Application using the JBoss Developer Studio and the aCute plugin (C# application development). We’ll deploy our application onto an OpenShift instance and continue to modify it while viewing the changes almost instantly. Although the initial setup will be quite involved, it will only need to be done once.

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