Java

Decoupling microservices with Apache Camel and Debezium

Decoupling microservices with Apache Camel and Debezium

The rise of microservices-oriented architecture brought us new development paradigms and mantras about independent development and decoupling. In such a scenario, we have to deal with a situation where we aim for independence, but we still need to react to state changes in different enterprise domains.

I’ll use a simple and typical example in order to show what we’re talking about. Imagine the development of two independent microservices: Order and User. We designed them to expose a REST interface and to each use a separate database, as shown in Figure 1:

Diagram 1 - Order and User microservices

Figure 1: Order and User microservices.

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How Quarkus brings imperative and reactive programming together

How Quarkus brings imperative and reactive programming together

The supersonic subatomic Java singularity has expanded!

42 releases, 8 months of community participation, and 177 amazing contributors led up to the release of Quarkus 1.0.  This release is a significant milestone with a lot of cool features behind it. You can read more in the release announcement.

Building on that awesome news, we want to delve into how Quarkus unifies both imperative and reactive programming models and its reactive core. We’ll start with a brief history and then take a deep dive into what makes up this dual-faceted reactive core and how Java developers can take advantage of it.

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Open Liberty Java runtime now available to Red Hat Runtimes subscribers

Open Liberty Java runtime now available to Red Hat Runtimes subscribers

Open Liberty is a lightweight, production-ready Java runtime for containerizing and deploying microservices to the cloud, and is now available as part of a Red Hat Runtimes subscription. If you are a Red Hat Runtimes subscriber, you can write your Eclipse MicroProfile and Jakarta EE apps on Open Liberty and then run them in containers on Red Hat OpenShift, with commercial support from Red Hat and IBM.

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Quarkus: Modernize “helloworld” JBoss EAP quickstart, Part 2

Quarkus: Modernize “helloworld” JBoss EAP quickstart, Part 2

In part one of this series, we took a detailed look at Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP) quickstarts helloworld quickstart as a starting point for understanding how to modernize a Java application using technologies (CDI and Servlet 3) supported in Quarkus. In this part, we’ll continue our discussion of modernization with a look at memory consumption.

Measuring performances is a fundamental topic when dealing with a modernization process, and memory consumption reporting is part of performance analysis. It’s worth starting with these tools from the very beginning so that they can be used to evaluate the improvements achieved during the modernization process.

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Quarkus: Modernize “helloworld” JBoss EAP quickstart, Part 1

Quarkus: Modernize “helloworld” JBoss EAP quickstart, Part 1

Quarkus is, in its own words, “Supersonic subatomic Java” and a “Kubernetes native Java stack tailored for GraalVM & OpenJDK HotSpot, crafted from the best of breed Java libraries and standards.” For the purpose of illustrating how to modernize an existing Java application to Quarkus, I will use the Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP) quickstarts helloworld quickstart as sample of a Java application builds using technologies (CDI and Servlet 3) supported in Quarkus.

It’s important to note that both Quarkus and JBoss EAP rely on providing developers with tools based—as much as possible—on standards. If your application is not already running on JBoss EAP, there’s no problem. You can migrate it from your current application server to JBoss EAP using the Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit. After that, the final and working modernized version of the code is available in the https://github.com/mrizzi/jboss-eap-quickstarts/tree/quarkus repository inside the helloworld module.

This article is based on the guides Quarkus provides, mainly Creating Your First Application and Building a Native Executable.

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Get hands-on experience with Kubernetes and Quarkus at DevNation Live in Austin

Get hands-on experience with Kubernetes and Quarkus at DevNation Live in Austin

Join us December 12, 2019 for this free, one-day, two-track event at the Hilton Austin with Red Hat experts.

The cloud is dramatically changing established development practices, and developers need expert training and hands-on experience to stay up to date.

Join Red Hat’s developer advocates (including Burr Sutter, Edson Yanaga, and Kamesth Sampath) in Austin, Texas for a day of technical sessions, conversation, and hands-on workshops focused on Kubernetes development and Java microservices. Whether you are a Java developer or work in Node.js, C#, Ruby, or Python, you will gain a strong understanding of how to use modern architecture, new patterns, and DevOps to make the most of your work in the cloud.

Register now

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Jakarta EE: What’s in store for Enterprise JavaBeans?

Jakarta EE: What’s in store for Enterprise JavaBeans?

Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) has been very important to the Java EE ecosystem and promoted many robust solutions to enterprise problems. Besides that, in the past when integration techniques were not so advanced, EJB did great work with remote EJB, integrating many Java EE applications. However, remote EJB is not necessary anymore, and we have many techniques and tools that are better for doing that. So, does EJB still have a place in this new cloud-native world?

Before writing this post, I did an informal survey via Twitter poll to hear what the community thinks about it. In this article, I’ll share the results of the survey as well as some discussion that emerged as part of the poll. Additionally, I’ll share my opinions on the topic.

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What’s new in Red Hat Dependency Analytics

What’s new in Red Hat Dependency Analytics

We are excited to announce a new release of Red Hat Dependency Analytics, a solution that enables developers to create better applications by evaluating and adding high-quality open source components, directly from their IDE.

Red Hat Dependency Analytics helps your development team avoid security and licensing issues when building your applications. It plugs into the developer’s IDE, automatically analyzes your software composition, and provides recommendations to address security holes and licensing problems that your team may be missing.

Without further ado, let’s jump into the new capabilities offered in this release. This release includes a new version of the IDE plugin and the server-side analysis service hosted by Red Hat.

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