Internet of Things

Developing at the edge: Best practices for edge computing

Developing at the edge: Best practices for edge computing

Edge computing continues to gain force as ever more companies increase their investments in edge, even if they’re only dipping their toes in with small-scale pilot deployments. Emerging use cases like Internet-of-Things (IoT), augmented reality, and virtual reality (AR/VR), robotics, and telecommunications-network functions are often cited as key drivers for companies moving computing to the edge. Traditional enterprises are also looking at edge computing to better support their remote offices, retail locations, manufacturing plants, and more. At the network edge, service providers can deploy an entirely new class of services to take advantage of their proximity to customers.

Continue reading Developing at the edge: Best practices for edge computing

Share
IoT Developer Survey takes a turn to edge computing: Deadline June 26 2020

IoT Developer Survey takes a turn to edge computing: Deadline June 26 2020

The Eclipse IoT Working Group has launched the annual IoT Developer Survey. This survey is in its sixth edition and is the largest developer survey in the Internet-of-Things (IoT) open source industry. The deadline to submit your responses is June 26, 2020.

About the IoT Developer Survey

This year’s IoT Developer Survey will provide valuable insights into current trends in the IoT-industry landscape and the requirements and challenges that IoT communities are facing. The survey will also highlight how these trends are shaping and impacting businesses and enterprise strategies for software vendors, hardware manufacturers, service providers, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), enterprises of all sizes, and individual developers.

Continue reading “IoT Developer Survey takes a turn to edge computing: Deadline June 26 2020”

Share
LoRaWAN setup at the EclipseCon IoT playground

LoRaWAN setup at the EclipseCon IoT playground

At the recent EclipseCon Europe in Ludwigsburg, Germany, we had a big dashboard in the IoT playground area showing graphs of the number of WiFi devices, the temperature, and air quality, all transmitted via LoRaWAN. We worked on this project during the community day and kept the setup throughout the conference, where we showed it and played with it even further. This article describes the architecture of the setup and gives pointers to replicate it.

Continue reading “LoRaWAN setup at the EclipseCon IoT playground”

Share
How to build a Raspberry Pi photo booth

How to build a Raspberry Pi photo booth

The Coderland booth at the recent Red Hat Summit was all about serverless computing as implemented in the Compile Driver. If you haven’t gone through that example (you really should), that code creates a souvenir photo by superimposing the Coderland logo, a date stamp, and a message on top of an image from a webcam. We thought it would be fun to build a Raspberry Pi version for the booth so we could offer attendees a free souvenir. Here’s a look at the finished product:

Front of the photo booth

Continue reading “How to build a Raspberry Pi photo booth”

Share
Bringing IoT to Red Hat AMQ Online

Bringing IoT to Red Hat AMQ Online

Red Hat AMQ Online 1.1 was recently announced, and I am excited about it because it contains a tech preview of our Internet of Things (IoT) support. AMQ Online is the “messaging as service solution” from Red Hat AMQ. Leveraging the work we did on Eclipse Hono allows us to integrate a scalable, cloud-native IoT personality into this general-purpose messaging layer. And the whole reason why you need an IoT messaging layer is so you can focus on connecting your cloud-side application with the millions of devices that you have out there.

Continue reading “Bringing IoT to Red Hat AMQ Online”

Share
IoT edge development and deployment with containers through OpenShift: Part 2

IoT edge development and deployment with containers through OpenShift: Part 2

In the first part of this series, we saw how effective a platform as a service (PaaS) such as Red Hat OpenShift is for developing IoT edge applications and distributing them to remote sites, thanks to containers and Red Hat Ansible Automation technologies.

Usually, we think about IoT applications as something specially designed for low power devices with limited capabilities.  IoT devices might use a different CPU architectures or platform. For this reason, we tend to use completely different technologies for IoT application development than for services that run in a data center.

In part two, we explore some techniques that allow you to build and test contains for alternate architectures such as ARM64 on an x86_64 host.  The goal we are working towards is to enable you to use the same language, framework, and development tools for code that runs in your datacenter or all the way out to IoT edge devices. In this article, I’ll show building and running an AArch64 container image on an x86_64 host and then building an RPI3 image to run it on physical hardware using Fedora and Podman.

Continue reading “IoT edge development and deployment with containers through OpenShift: Part 2”

Share
IoT edge development and deployment with containers through OpenShift: Part 1

IoT edge development and deployment with containers through OpenShift: Part 1

Usually, we think about IoT applications as something very special made for low power devices that have limited capabilities. For this reason, we tend to use completely different technologies for IoT application development than the technology we use for creating a datacenter’s services.

This article is part 1 of a two-part series. In it, we’ll explore some techniques that may give you a chance to use containers as a medium for application builds—techniques that enable the portability of containers across different environments. Through these techniques, you may be able to use the same language, framework, or tool used in your datacenter straight to the “edge,” even with different CPU architectures!

We usually use “edge” to refer to the geographic distribution of computing nodes in a network of IoT devices that are at the “edge” of an enterprise. The “edge” could be a remote datacenter or maybe multiple geo-distributed factories, ships, oil plants, and so on.

Continue reading “IoT edge development and deployment with containers through OpenShift: Part 1”

Share
Why you should care about RISC-V

Why you should care about RISC-V

If you haven’t heard about the RISC-V (pronounced “risk five”) processor, it’s an open-source (open-hardware, open-design) processor core created by the University of Berkeley. It exists in 32-bit, 64-bit, and 128-bit variants, although only 32- and 64-bit designs exist in practice. The news is full of stories about major hardware manufacturers (Western Digital, NVidia) looking at or choosing RISC-V cores for their product.

Continue reading Why you should care about RISC-V

Share
Announcing AMQ Streams: Apache Kafka on OpenShift

Announcing AMQ Streams: Apache Kafka on OpenShift

Hi all,

We are excited to announce a Developer Preview of Red Hat AMQ Streams, a new addition to Red Hat AMQ, focused on running Apache Kafka on OpenShift.

Apache Kafka is a leading real-time, distributed messaging platform for building data pipelines and streaming applications.

Using Kafka, applications can:

  • Publish and subscribe to streams of records.
  • Store streams of records.
  • Process records as they occur.

Continue reading “Announcing AMQ Streams: Apache Kafka on OpenShift”

Share
IoT Developer Survey – Deadline March 5, 2018

IoT Developer Survey – Deadline March 5, 2018

We are seeking input from Internet of Things (#IoT) developers to better understand their needs for software and related tools. Whether you’re a hacker instrumenting your home with Raspberry Pi, or an IT developer working on Industrial IoT solutions, we want to know how you’re using open source technologies to build your IoT solution. The output from this survey will help the open source community focus on the resources most needed by IoT developers.

Continue reading IoT Developer Survey – Deadline March 5, 2018

Share