James Falkner

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Announcing Thorntail 2.4 general availability

Announcing Thorntail 2.4 general availability

At this year’s Red Hat Summit, Red Hat announced Thorntail 2.4 general availability for Red Hat customers through a subscription to Red Hat Application Runtimes. Red Hat Application Runtimes provides application developers with a variety of application runtimes running on the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform.

Introduction to Thorntail

Thorntail is the new name for WildFly Swarm, and it bundles everything you need to develop and run Thorntail and MicroProfile applications by packaging server runtime libraries with your application code and running it with java -jar. It speeds up the transition from monoliths to microservices and takes advantage of your existing industry standard Java EE technology experience.

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Extending support to Spring Boot 2.x for Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Extending support to Spring Boot 2.x for Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

What Red Hat is providing

Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR) is a recommended set of products, tools, and components for developing and maintaining cloud-native applications on the Red Hat OpenShift platform. As part of this offering, Red Hat is extending its support to Spring Boot 2 and related frameworks for building modern, production-grade, Java-based cloud-native applications.

Spring Boot lets you create opinionated Spring-based standalone applications. The Spring Boot runtime also integrates with the OpenShift platform, allowing your services to externalize their configuration, implement health checks, provide resiliency and failover, and much more. To learn more about how Spring Boot applications integrate with the wider Red Hat portfolio, check out the following OpenShift Commons Briefing by Thomas Qvarnstrom:

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Extending support to Spring Boot for Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Extending support to Spring Boot for Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

What Red Hat is providing

Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR) is a recommended set of products, tools, and components for developing and maintaining cloud-native applications on the Red Hat OpenShift platform. As part of this offering, Red Hat is extending its support to Spring Boot and related frameworks for building modern, production-grade, Java-based cloud-native applications.

Spring Boot lets you create opinionated Spring-based standalone applications. The Spring Boot runtime also integrates with the OpenShift platform, allowing your services to externalize their configuration, implement health checks, provide resiliency and failover, and much more. To learn more about how Spring Boot applications integrate with the wider Red Hat portfolio, check out the following OpenShift Commons Briefing by Thomas Qvarnstrom:

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Announcing: Thorntail 2.2 General Availability

Announcing: Thorntail 2.2 General Availability

An Introduction to Thorntail

Today Red Hat is making Thorntail 2.2 generally available to Red Hat customers through a subscription to Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR). RHOAR provides application developers with a variety of application runtimes running on the OpenShift Container Platform.

Thorntail is the new name for WildFly Swarm, and bundles everything you need to develop and run Thorntail and MicroProfile applications by packaging server runtime libraries with your application code and running it with java -jar. It speeds up the transition from monoliths to microservices and takes advantage of your existing industry standard Java EE technology experience.

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Deploying MicroProfile apps on Microsoft Azure using the Azure Open Service Broker

Deploying MicroProfile apps on Microsoft Azure using the Azure Open Service Broker

At the recently concluded Microsoft Ignite 2018 conference in Orlando, I had the honor of presenting to a crowd of Java developers and Azure professionals eager to learn how to put their Java skills to work building next-gen apps on Azure. Of course, that meant showcasing the technology coming out of the popular MicroProfile community, in which Red Hat plays a big part (and makes a fully supported, productized MicroProfile implementation through Thorntail, part of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes).

We did a demo too, which is the main topic of this blog post, showing how easy it is to link your Java MicroProfile apps to Azure services through the Open Service Broker for Azure (the open source, Open Service Broker-compatible API server that provisions managed services in the Microsoft Azure public cloud) and OpenShift’s Service Catalog.

Here’s how to reproduce the demo.

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Bringing Coolstore Microservices to the Service Mesh: Part 2–Manual Injection

Bringing Coolstore Microservices to the Service Mesh: Part 2–Manual Injection

Coolstore+Istio Logo

In the first part of this series we explored the Istio project and how Red Hat is committed to and actively involved in the project and working to integrate it into Kubernetes and OpenShift to bring the benefits of a service mesh to our customers and the wider communities involved. If you want to play with Istio, check out the service mesh tutorials on learn.openshift.com. If you want to install it, follow the Istio Kubernetes quickstart instructions and install it on OpenShift 3.7 or later. Also don’t miss Don Schenck’s series of blogs on Istio technology in general to learn more about it and what Red Hat is doing in this space.

In this post, we will deploy the existing Coolstore microservices demo as a service mesh and start to demonstrate the tangible value you can get out of the system without any major rewrite or rearchitecture of the existing app. We’ll also improve our project along the way to adhere to Istio (and general microservice) best practices. In the real world, your applications and developers often make bad assumptions or fail to implement best practices, so with this information you can learn something about your own projects. For Coolstore, many of these workarounds will eventually find their way into the source code of the demo.

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Bringing Coolstore Microservices to the Service Mesh: Part 1 – Exploring Auto-injection

Bringing Coolstore Microservices to the Service Mesh: Part 1 – Exploring Auto-injection

As the industry heads toward the Trough of Disillusionment with cloud-native microservices, finally understanding that distributed architectures introduce more complexity (weird, right?), services meshes can help soften the landing and shift some of that complexity out of our applications and place it where it belongs, in the application operational layer.

At Red Hat we are committed to (and actively involved in) the upstream Istio project and working to integrate it into Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift to bring the benefits of a service mesh to our customers and the wider communities involved. If you want to play with Istio, check out the Service Mesh Tutorials on learn.Openshift.com. If you want to install it, follow the Istio Kubernetes quickstart instructions and install it on Red Hat OpenShift 3.7 or later (or 3.9 if you want to use auto-injection).

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Announcing: Node.js General Availability in Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Announcing: Node.js General Availability in Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Node.js Foundation Logo

Summary

Today Red Hat is making Node.js generally available to Red Hat customers through a subscription to Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR). RHOAR provides application developers with a variety of application runtimes running on the OpenShift Container Platform.

Node.js is based on the V8 JavaScript engine and allows you to write server-side JavaScript applications. Node.js joins the existing set of supported runtimes and offers developers an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.

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The Skinny on Fat, Thin, Hollow, and Uber

The Skinny on Fat, Thin, Hollow, and Uber

“I used WildFly Swarm to shrink my app from 45 megabytes to only 2243 bytes.”

I was recently playing around with various techniques for packaging Java microservices and running on OpenShift using various runtimes and frameworks to illustrate their differences (WildFly Swarm vs. WildFly, Spring Boot vs. the world, etc). Around the same time as I was doing this an internal email list thread ignited discussing some of the differences and using terms like Uber JARs, Thin WARs, Skinny WARs, and a few others. Some folks were highlighting the pros and cons of each, especially the benefits of the thin WAR approach when combined with docker image layers.

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Microservices: Comparing DIY with Apache Camel

Microservices are currently enjoying immense popularity. It is rare to find a tech conference without at least a few mentions of them in corridor conversations or titles of talks, and for good reason: microservices can provide a path to better, more maintainable, higher quality software delivered faster. What’s not to love?

Of course there are the “negatives” and details in the implementation of microservices that can trip up even the most seasoned architect-developer, but at the same time we are collectively learning from mistakes and creating or reusing fantastic open source projects and products that can help smooth over those rough bits.

One such project is Apache Camel (and Fuse, its Red Hat-supported distribution.) Created way before the microservices revolution, Apache Camel was born to ease integration of disparate computing systems by implementing well-tested enterprise integration patterns (EIPs) and supplying a developer-friendly interface for writing code to do the integration.

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