Alessandro Arrichiello

Solution Architect

Alessandro Arrichiello

Highly motivated Linux professional. Proven ability to design and architect complex systems with all the Red Hat portfolio. Currently focusing on expanding knowledge on OpenShift AI. RH Developer Blog Contributor. Author of the book "Podman for DevOps".

Alessandro Arrichiello's contributions

How to install Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift
Article

Understanding Ansible Tower Isolated Nodes

Alessandro Arrichiello

Learn how Ansible Tower Isolated nodes can be used to manage systems that are on restricted remote networks such as VPCs, and hosted environments

Red Hat OpenShift
Article

OpenShift 3.6 - Release Candidate (A Hands-On)

Alessandro Arrichiello

Hi, Everybody! Today I want to introduce you to some features of OpenShift 3.6 while giving you the chance to have a hands-on experience with the Release Candidate. First of all: It's a Release Candidate and the features I'll show you are marked as Tech Preview, so use them for testing purpose ONLY! We cannot use Minishift just because there is no Minishift updated yet. Anyway, I'll show how could use its base iso-image. I don't want to use 'oc...

Using API keys securely in your OpenShift microservices and applications
Article

The CoolStore Microservices Example: DevOps and OpenShift

Alessandro Arrichiello

An introduction to microservices through a complete example Today I want to talk about the demo we presented @ OpenShift Container Platform Roadshow in Milan & Rome last week. The demo was based on JBoss team's great work available on this repo: https://github.com/jbossdemocentral/coolstore-microservice In the next few paragraphs, I'll describe in deep detail the microservices CoolStore example and how we used it for creating a great and useful example of DevOps practices. We made some edits to the original project...

Red Hat CDK
Article

Adding Persistent Storage to Minishift / CDK 3 in Minutes

Alessandro Arrichiello

Hi there! It's been a while since I last wrote an article. Today, I want to show you how to easily setup some persistent storage for your projects in minishift / CDK 3 (Red Hat's Containers Development Kit 3). Prerequisites First, let's start planning what you'll need: A working minishift or CDK 3. That's all, I swear! I won't go deep into how to set up a minishift or CDK 3, there are many articles on the Internet to cover...

Using API keys securely in your OpenShift microservices and applications
Article

Using Pipelines in OpenShift 3.3+ for CI/CD

Alessandro Arrichiello

It's been a while since Red Hat released version 3.3 of OpenShift Container Platform, this version is full of features. One of my favorites is the support for Pipelines (Tech Preview for now) that lets you easily integrate Jenkins builds on your OpenShift (Origin) Platform. OpenShift Pipelines OpenShift Pipelines are based on the Jenkins Pipeline plugin. ( https://jenkins.io/solutions/pipeline/ ) Integrating Jenkins Pipelines into OpenShift unlocks all the features for the CI/CD world enabling its users to easily manage repeatable tasks...

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Article

Cockpit: Your entrypoint to the Containers Management World

Alessandro Arrichiello

Containers are one of the top trend today. Starting working or playing with them could be really hard also if you've well understood the theory at their base. With this article I'll try to show you some useful tips and tricks to start into containers world, thanks also to the great web interface provided by the Cockpit project. Cockpit overview Cockpit is an interactive server admin interface. You'll find below some a of its great features: Cockpit comes “out of...

Using API keys securely in your OpenShift microservices and applications
Article

Understanding OpenShift Security Context Constraints

Alessandro Arrichiello

OpenShift gives its administrators the ability to manage a set of security context constraints (SCCs) for limiting and securing their cluster. Security context constraints allow administrators to control permissions for pods using the CLI. SCCs allow an administrator to control the following: Running of privileged containers. Capabilities a container can request to be added. Use of host directories as volumes. The SELinux context of the container. The user ID. The use of host namespaces and networking. Allocating an 'FSGroup' that...