Cesar Saavedra

Recent Posts

The State of Microservices Survey 2017 – Eight trends you need to know

During the fall of 2017, we conducted a microservices survey with our Red Hat Middleware and Red Hat OpenShift customers. Here are eight interesting trends discerned by the results:

I. Microservices are being used to re-architect existing applications as much as for brand new projects

There seems to be a strong emphasis in the market by technology vendors for positioning microservices as being only for new projects.  However, our survey reveals that organizations are also using microservices to re-architect existing and legacy applications.

Sixty-seven percent of Red Hat Middleware customers and 79 percent of Red Hat OpenShift customers indicated this. This data tells us that microservices offer value to users all along their IT transformation journey — whether they are just looking to update their current application portfolio or are gearing up new initiatives. So, if you are only focused on greenfield projects for microservices, it may be a good idea to also start evaluating your existing applications for a microservice re-architecture analysis. Microservices introduce a set of benefits that our customers have already started seeing, and they are applying these benefits not just to new projects but to existing ones as well.

II. Customers prefer a multi-runtime/multi-technology/multi-framework approach for microservices

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A MicroProfile-based microservice on OpenShift Container Platform – Part 1

Creating a simple MicroProfile-based microservice and deploying it to OpenShift Container Platform

Eclipse MicroProfile is an open source specification for Enterprise Java microservices. It is a community of individuals, vendors, and organizations collaborating and working on innovative microservices patterns for Enterprise Java within the context of modern development, architectures, and underlying infrastructures, e.g. health checks, fault tolerance, metrics, and security propagation within a cloud environment. Its first release was based on 3 Java EE JSRs/libraries/APIs, but this does not necessarily mean that everything that Eclipse MicroProfile does will be Java EE-centric, some API specifications may end up just being part of MicroProfile, depending on the community itself and the spec leads for Java EE1. For example, the new release of Eclipse MicroProfile 1.1 includes the Config API, which is a non-Java-EE API. One of the goals of the Eclipse MicroProfile project is to innovate so its release schedule is agile compared to a standards body.

Continue reading “A MicroProfile-based microservice on OpenShift Container Platform – Part 1”

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