Introducing 10 new features in Quarkus Tools for Visual Studio Code

Introducing 10 new features in Quarkus Tools for Visual Studio Code

Quarkus Tools for Visual Studio Code version 1.3.0 has been released on the VS Code Marketplace to start off the new year. As Quarkus continues to introduce improvements and new features like application.yaml and server-side templating support, Quarkus Tools for Visual Studio Code continues to evolve to accompany these new features and improvements.

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Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 IPI on OpenStack 13: All-in-one setup

Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 IPI on OpenStack 13: All-in-one setup

Months ago, a customer asked me about Red Hat OpenShift on OpenStack, especially regarding the network configuration options available in OpenShift at the node level. In order to give them an answer and increase my confidence on $topic, I’ve considered how to test this scenario.

At the same time, the Italian solution architect “Top Gun Team” was in charge of preparing speeches and demos for the Italian Red Hat Forum (also known as Open Source Day) for the Rome and Milan dates. Brainstorming led me to start my journey toward testing OpenShift 4.2 setup on OpenStack 13 in order to reply to the customer and leverage this effort to build a demo video for Red Hat Forum.

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Customizing OpenShift project creation

Customizing OpenShift project creation

I recently attended an excellent training run by Red Hat’s Global Partner Enablement Team on advanced Red Hat OpenShift management. One of the most interesting elements of the training was how to customize default project creation. This article explains how to use OpenShift’s projectRequestTemplate to add default controls for the resources that a project is allowed to consume.

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How to use third-party APIs in Operator SDK projects

How to use third-party APIs in Operator SDK projects

The Operator Framework is an open source toolkit for managing Kubernetes-native applications. This framework and its features provide the ability to develop tools that simplify complexities, such as installing, configuring, managing, and packaging applications on Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift. In this article, we show how to use third-party APIs in Operator-SDK projects.

In projects built with Operator-SDK, only the Kubernetes API schemas are added by default. However, you might need to create, read, update, or delete a resource that is from another API—even one that you created yourself via other Operator projects.

Let’s check out an example scenario: How to create a Route resource from the OpenShift API for an Operator-SDK project.

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Camel K standalone Java file: Now with Java language support

Camel K standalone Java file: Now with Java language support

Apache Camel K should be as lightweight as possible. Therefore, the Camel K project provides standalone Java files to describe a Camel integration. The downside to this practice is that existing IDEs cannot provide complete support out of the box. To provide a complete experience with Apache Camel K’s standalone Java files, there were three solutions:

As a result, there is no intuitive configuration. However, Red Hat’s Tooling for Apache Camel K offers a new possibility.

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Click-through learning with VS Code and Didact

Click-through learning with VS Code and Didact

The Didact project is designed to fill a void in Visual Studio Code, but what exactly is it? And more importantly, why should you care?

Didact started as a “What if?” VS Code doesn’t provide a great way to walk users through a step-wise tutorial. “What if” we could meet that need by combining the following:

  • A simple markup language (such as Markdown or AsciiDoc).
  • The ability to render the markup as HTML using the VS Code webview.
  • A way to invoke the commands we create for each VS Code extension.

And over the course of a day or so of coding, I had a working prototype.

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Vault IDs in Red Hat Ansible and Red Hat Ansible Tower

Vault IDs in Red Hat Ansible and Red Hat Ansible Tower

This article demonstrates the use of multiple vault passwords through vault IDs. You will learn how to use vault IDs to encrypt a file and a string. Once they’re encrypted, the vault ID can be referenced inside a playbook and used within Red Hat Ansible and Red Hat Ansible Tower.

Starting with Ansible 2.4 and above, vault IDs are supported

Vault IDs help you encrypt different files with different passwords to be referenced inside a playbook. Before Ansible 2.4, only one vault password could be used in each Ansible playbook. In effect, every file needed to be encrypted using the same vault password.

To begin with, vault IDs need to be pre-created and referenced inside your ansible.cfg file. The following excerpt is from ansible-config list for the configuration DEFAULT_VAULT_IDENTITY_LIST:

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API login and JWT token generation using Keycloak

API login and JWT token generation using Keycloak

Red Hat single sign-on (SSO)—or its open source version, Keycloak—is one of the leading products for web SSO capabilities, and is based on popular standards such as Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML) 2.0, OpenID Connect, and OAuth 2.0. One of Red Hat SSO’s strongest features is that we can access Keycloak directly in many ways, whether through a simple HTML login form, or an API call. In the following scenario, we will generate a JWT token and then validate it. Everything will be done using API calls, so Keycloak’s UI is not exposed to the public directly.

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Use Red Hat OpenShift’s built-in OAuth server as an authentication provider in Open Liberty

Use Red Hat OpenShift’s built-in OAuth server as an authentication provider in Open Liberty

In Open Liberty 20.0.0.1, you can configure the Social Login feature to use Red Hat OpenShift’s OAuth server for authentication. In addition, there is a new MicroProfile Metric to measure CPU time, memory heap and response time. This release also offers faster application startups with Liberty annotation caching, and an updated JavaServer Face.

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Introduction to Eclipse JKube: Java tooling for Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift

Introduction to Eclipse JKube: Java tooling for Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift

We as Java developers are often busy working on our applications by optimizing application memory, speed, etc. In recent years, encapsulating our applications into lightweight, independent units called containers has become quite a trend, and almost every enterprise is trying to shift its infrastructure onto container technologies like Docker and Kubernetes.

Kubernetes is an open source system for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications, but it has a steep learning curve, and an application developer with no background in DevOps can find this system a bit overwhelming. In this article, I will talk about tools that can help when deploying your Maven applications to Kubernetes/Red Hat OpenShift.

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