5 tips for developing Kubernetes Operators with the new Operator SDK

5 tips for developing Kubernetes Operators with the new Operator SDK

Kubernetes Operators are all the rage this season, and the fame is well deserved. Operators are evolving from being used primarily by technical-infrastructure gurus to becoming more mainstream, Kubernetes-native tools for managing complex applications. Kubernetes Operators today are important for cluster administrators and ISV providers, and also for custom applications developed in house. They provide the base for a standardized operational model that is similar to what cloud providers offer. Operators also open the door to fully portable workloads and services on Kubernetes.

The new Kubernetes Operator Framework is an open source toolkit that lets you manage Kubernetes Operators in an effective, automated, and scalable way. The Operator Framework consists of three components: the Operator SDK, the Operator Lifecycle Manager, and OperatorHub. In this article, I introduce tips and tricks for working with the Operator SDK. The Operator SDK 1.0.0 release shipped in mid-August, so it’s a great time to have a look at it.

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Quarkus and Jakarta EE: Together, or not?

Quarkus and Jakarta EE: Together, or not?

In this article, I answer a question that I have seen asked on various forums: Will Quarkus be compatible with Jakarta EE? To understand our answer to that question, it is helpful to know the history of Quarkus and what we’re trying to achieve with it. So, please indulge me while I lay that groundwork.

A short history of Quarkus and Java EE

When Emmanuel Bernard, Jason Greene, Bob McWhirter, and I first discussed kicking off the ThornFly.x proof of concept, which would later become Quarkus, we had conversations about where Java EE (now Jakarta EE) would eventually fit. I think we all agreed that we already had the best open source implementation of Java EE in the form of WildFly and Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP). Creating yet another addition to this space seemed confusing at best. At worst, we feared that it would split our engineering and open source community efforts.

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From code to production with OpenShift Pipelines and Argo CD

From code to production with OpenShift Pipelines and Argo CD

Our team is responsible for a small GoLang application. The application’s developers are continuously sending code changes to the main branch, so for the past two years, our team has used GitOps for continuous integration (CI). We started out using GitOps to deploy applications to our test clusters; then, we began using it to run day two operations in our clusters.

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How to run Red Hat CodeReady Containers on Windows 10 Enterprise

How to run Red Hat CodeReady Containers on Windows 10 Enterprise

Red Hat CodeReady Containers allows you to spin up a small Red Hat OpenShift cluster on your local PC, with the need for a server, a cloud, or a team of operations people. For developers who want to get started immediately with cloud-native development, containers, and Kubernetes (as well as OpenShift), it’s a simple and slick tool. It runs on macOS, Linux, and all versions of Windows 10.

Except for Windows 10 Enterprise.

Which I painfully learned.

Because I lazily didn’t pay attention to the documentation.

OK, so I’m the only developer who glosses over documentation. Fortunately for you, I struggled and managed to get CRC running on my Windows 10 Enterprise notebook computer, and this article explains what is involved to get it working. So, in a sense, you’re welcome that I’m lazy.

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Cloud-native Java applications made easy: Eclipse JKube 1.0.0 now available

Cloud-native Java applications made easy: Eclipse JKube 1.0.0 now available

After nine months of incubation with the Eclipse Foundation, Eclipse JKube 1.0.0 is finally here. This release marks the final deprecation of the great Fabric8 Maven Plugin (FMP) project. JKube is a complete replacement of FMP and includes all of the major features. Projects relying on FMP to create Apache Maven Java containers should migrate to Eclipse JKube to take full advantage of the new features, bug fixes, and upstream project maintenance described in this article.

JKube is a collection of plugins plus a standalone Java library that fit into your Maven project. If you have a Java project that needs to get deployed into Kubernetes or Red Hat OpenShift, this is the right tool for you. JKube takes care of everything related to the cluster deployment while you, as a developer, get to concentrate on implementing your application without worrying about where it needs to be deployed.

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How to install the CouchbaseDB Operator for Red Hat OpenShift on your laptop using Red Hat CodeReady Containers and Red Hat Marketplace

How to install the CouchbaseDB Operator for Red Hat OpenShift on your laptop using Red Hat CodeReady Containers and Red Hat Marketplace

Red Hat Marketplace is an online store of sorts, where you can choose the software that you want to install and run on your Red Hat OpenShift cluster. The analogy is a phone app store, where you select an app, and it’s automagically installed on your phone. With Marketplace, you simply register your cluster(s), select the software that you want, and it is installed for you. It could not be easier.

In this article, I show you how to install Couchbase Server Enterprise Edition on an OpenShift cluster. In my case, the cluster is running on Fedora 32 using Red Hat CodeReady Containers (CRC). Couchbase Server Enterprise Edition is currently available as a free trial, and CRC is also available at zero cost. This setup offers a no-risk way to try containers, Kubernetes, OpenShift, and, in this case, Couchbase. This is definitely “developers playing around with the software”-level stuff.

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Install Red Hat OpenShift Operators on your laptop using Red Hat CodeReady Containers and Red Hat Marketplace

Install Red Hat OpenShift Operators on your laptop using Red Hat CodeReady Containers and Red Hat Marketplace

Red Hat CodeReady Containers (CRC) is the quickest way for developers to get started with clusters on Red Hat OpenShift 4.1 or newer. CodeReady Containers is designed to run on a local computer. It simplifies setup and testing by emulating the cloud development environment locally with all of the tools that you need to develop container-based applications.

Red Hat Marketplace is an open cloud marketplace that makes it easy to discover and purchase the certified, containerized tools you need to build enterprise-first applications. It was created to help developers using OpenShift build applications and deploy them across a hybrid cloud. Red Hat Marketplace works on any developer workstation that is running CodeReady Containers.

This article guides you through the steps of setting up Red Hat Marketplace and installing containerized products in your local CodeReady Containers-based OpenShift clusters.

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Keeping Kubernetes secrets secret

Keeping Kubernetes secrets secret

DevNation Tech Talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions plus code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn how to manage Kubernetes secrets from Alex Soto Bueno and Burr Sutter.

Everyone is talking about microservices and serverless architecture, and how to deploy them using cluster managers like Kubernetes. But, what about the secrets (such as certificates, passwords, SSH, and API keys)? The current trend increases the number of secrets required to run our services. This fact places a new level of maintenance on our security teams.

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Migrate your Java apps to containers with Migration Toolkit for Applications 5.0

Migrate your Java apps to containers with Migration Toolkit for Applications 5.0

As a developer, you have probably experimented with Kubernetes. It’s also possible that you are already running several Java applications on a Kubernetes platform, maybe Red Hat OpenShift. These initial containerized applications were greenfield projects, where you enjoyed the benefits of a platform providing templated deployments, easy rollbacks, resource availability, security by default, and a manageable way to publish your services.

Now, you might be thinking, “How can I enjoy all of these benefits in my existing Java applications?” Most Java applications in production today are running on virtual machines (VMs), likely on an application platform that is not container friendly. So, how can you migrate them from the current platform to containers on Kubernetes?

It isn’t an easy task, but this is a problem that we have been working hard on for years. Red Hat’s Migration Toolkit for Applications (MTA) 5.0 is the latest resulting iteration: An assembly of tools that you can use to analyze existing applications and discover what is required to modernize them. Read on to learn MTA 5.0’s features and migration paths.

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