Distributed microservices architecture: Enterprise integration, Istio, and managed API gateways

Distributed microservices architecture: Enterprise integration, Istio, and managed API gateways

The rise of microservices architectures drastically changed the software development landscape. In the past few years, we have seen a shift from centralized monoliths to distributed computing that benefits from cloud infrastructure. With distributed deployments, the adoption of microservices, and system scaling to cloud levels, new problems emerged, as well as new components that tried to solve the problems.

By now, you most likely have heard that the service mesh or Istio is here to save the day. However, you might be wondering how it fits with your current enterprise integration investments and API management initiatives. That is what I discuss in this article.

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An overview of Eclipse Che

An overview of Eclipse Che

This video is a brief overview of Eclipse Che presented by CodeReady Workspaces Product Manager Stévan Le Meur. The tour starts in a git repo that contains a link to a Che factory. Opening that factory loads the code from the git repo and sets up a complete development environment. From there, Stévan covers how to build, run, and debug the code within Che.

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Introducing Quarkus: a next-generation Kubernetes native Java framework

Introducing Quarkus: a next-generation Kubernetes native Java framework

Java was introduced to the open-source community over twenty years ago and to this day, it still remains very popular among developers. In fact, it has never ranked lower than #2 on the TIOBE Index. Java was born in the mid-90s and has nearly twenty years of optimizations for running highly dynamic monolithic applications that assumed sole ownership of (virtualized) host CPU and memory. However, we now live in a world dominated by the cloud, mobile, IoT, and open source, where containers, Kubernetes, microservices, reactive, Function-as-a-Service (FaaS), 12-factor, and cloud-native application development can deliver higher levels of productivity and efficiency. As an industry, we need to rethink how Java can be best utilized to address these new deployment environments and application architectures.

We’d like to introduce you to Quarkus and Supersonic Subatomic Java!

Quarkus is a Kubernetes Native Java framework tailored for GraalVM and HotSpot, crafted from best-of-breed Java libraries and standards. The goal of Quarkus is to make Java a leading platform in Kubernetes and serverless environments while offering developers a unified reactive and imperative programming model to optimally address a wider range of distributed application architectures.

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OpenShift 4.0 Developer Preview on AWS is up and running

OpenShift 4.0 Developer Preview on AWS is up and running

The OpenShift 4.0 Developer Preview is available for Amazon Web Services (AWS), and if you’re anything like me, you want to be among the first to get your hands on it.

The starting point is try.openshift.com, where you’ll find overview information and that important “Get Started” button. Click it and you’re off to the big show.

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Changes made to the Libabigail ABI change analysis framework in 2018

Changes made to the Libabigail ABI change analysis framework in 2018

This article is for people interested in the long-term maintenance of software systems that expose application binary interfaces (a.k.a. ABIs) to other systems. That long-term maintenance involves detecting and analyzing inevitable changes in the ABIs and assessing whether these changes allow the maintained systems to stay compatible with the components with which they interact.

In this article, I describe what happened to the ABI change analysis framework that I worked on during 2018: the Abigail library (Libabigail) and its associated set of tools. The goal is not to list the myriad changes that happened throughout releases 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, and 1.5 that occurred during that year, but I will walk you through the main changes that happened and put them in perspective.

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How Red Hat developers can create handy shortcuts with Firefox keyword bookmarks

How Red Hat developers can create handy shortcuts with Firefox keyword bookmarks

Firefox offers a simple way to enhance the browsing experience. With a little bit of configuration, you can turn the URL bar into a simple command-line tool to search bug databases, Internet RFCs, and CVEs. This comes in handy when you have an ID for a bug, but you do not have a link to click through. For example, if you have a Red Hat Bugzilla ID, just type rhbz <bugid> into Firefox’s search bar and Firefox will take you directly to that bug in Bugzilla.

In this article, after I show how to set up keyword-based bookmarks, I share a list of my shortcuts that I think will be handy for developers working with Red Hat products, projects, and communities.

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Introduction to using libFuzzer with llvm-toolset

Introduction to using libFuzzer with llvm-toolset

“Fuzzing” an application is a great way to find bugs that may be missed by other testing methods. Fuzzers test programs by generating random string inputs and feeding them into an application. Any program that accepts arbitrary inputs from its users is a good candidate for fuzzing. This includes compilers, interpreters, web applications, JSON or YAML parsers, and many more types of programs.

libFuzzer is a library to assist with the fuzzing of applications and libraries. It is integrated into the Clang C compiler and can be enabled for your application with the addition of a compile flag and by adding a fuzzing target to your code. libFuzzer has been used successfully to find bugs in many programs, and in this article, I will show how you can integrate libFuzzer into your own applications.

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How to install GCC 8 and Clang/LLVM 6 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

How to install GCC 8 and Clang/LLVM 6 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

There has been a lot of work to improve C/C++ compilers in recent years. A number of articles have been posted by Red Hat engineers working on the compilers themselves covering usability improvements, features to detect possible bugs, and security issues in your code.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta ships with GCC 8 as the default compiler. This article shows you how to install GCC 8 as well as Clang/LLVM 6 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. You’ll be able to use the same updated (and supported) compilers from Red Hat on both RHEL 7 and 8.

If you want your default gcc to always be GCC 8, or you want clang to always be in your path, this article shows how to permanently enable a software collection by adding it to the profile (dot files) for your user account. A number of common questions about software collections are also answered.

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