Building Red Hat Enterprise Linux 9 for the x86-64-v2 microarchitecture level

Building Red Hat Enterprise Linux 9 for the x86-64-v2 microarchitecture level

One of the most important early decisions when building a Linux distribution is the scope of supported hardware. The distribution’s default compiler flags are significant for hardware-platform compatibility. Programs that use newer CPU instructions might not run on older CPUs. In this article, I discuss a new approach to building the x86-64 variant of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 9 and share Red Hat’s recommendation for that build.

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Create your first serverless function with Red Hat OpenShift Serverless Functions

Create your first serverless function with Red Hat OpenShift Serverless Functions

Serverless is a powerful and popular paradigm where you don’t have to worry about managing and maintaining your application infrastructure. In the serverless context, a function is a single-purpose piece of code created by the developer but run and monitored by the managed infrastructure. A serverless function’s value is its simplicity and swiftness, which can entice even those who don’t consider themselves developers.

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How to restrict user authentication in Keycloak during identity brokering

How to restrict user authentication in Keycloak during identity brokering

As per the design, Keycloak imports all users into its local database if the users are authenticated via any third-party identity provider (e.g., Google, Facebook, or Okta). But what if users authenticated through the third-party identity provider have to be restricted—or be allowed only limited access—to applications that are federated with Keycloak? Here’s how you do it.

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Integrating Red Hat Single Sign-On version 7.4 with Red Hat Directory Server (LDAP)

Integrating Red Hat Single Sign-On version 7.4 with Red Hat Directory Server (LDAP)

This article describes the integration of Red Hat Single Sign-On (SSO) with Red Hat Directory Server 11 (LDAP). It also illustrates how it is possible to perform user synchronization and group synchronization between Red Hat Directory Server and Red Hat’s single sign-on tools.

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Use Kebechet machine learning to perform source code operations

Use Kebechet machine learning to perform source code operations

One of the first tools we developed to help us with Project Thoth was Kebechet, which we named for the goddess of freshness and purification. As we separated our software into more and more repositories (each of our Python modules is in its own repository on GitHub), we needed help with releasing new versions and keeping all dependent modules up-to-date. In a team of two and with more than 35 repositories, our process was a major time-burner.

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Supersonic, Subatomic gRPC services with Java and Quarkus

Supersonic, Subatomic gRPC services with Java and Quarkus

gRPC is an open source remote procedure call (RPC) framework. It was released by Google in 2015 and is now an incubating project within the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. This post introduces gRPC while explaining its underlying architecture and how it compares to REST over HTTP. You’ll also get started using Quarkus to implement and consume gRPC services.

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