More for developers in the new Red Hat OpenShift 4.6 web console

More for developers in the new Red Hat OpenShift 4.6 web console

Red Hat OpenShift 4.6 streamlines developer onboarding in the OpenShift web console, but that’s not all. This article details improvements and new features in the topology view and introduces OpenShift’s new, form-based approach to creating horizontal pod autoscalers and Helm charts. I also touch on application monitoring improvements and the latest updates for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines, Red Hat OpenShift Serverless, and the Kiali Operator in OpenShift 4.6.

Note: This article presents an overview of what’s new in OpenShift 4.6. See the video at the end of the article for a guide to accessing and using the new features in the OpenShift web console.

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Kubectl: Developer tips for the Kubernetes command line

Kubectl: Developer tips for the Kubernetes command line

Kubectl, the Kubernetes command-line interface (CLI), has more capabilities than many developers realize. For example, did you know that kubectl can reach the Kubernetes API while running inside a cluster? You can also use kubectl to assume different user identities, to select a custom editor to run with the kubectl edit command, and more.

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New developer onboarding features in Red Hat OpenShift 4.6

New developer onboarding features in Red Hat OpenShift 4.6

We’ve added new features in the Red Hat OpenShift 4.6 release to help developers get started faster with the OpenShift web console:

  • The default developer perspective is set based on your permissions.
  • The developer perspective includes a guided tour.
  • Quick starts guide you through common user flows.
  • Samples make it easy to deploy new applications on OpenShift.

Keep reading to learn about these new features to improve developer onboarding with the OpenShift web console in OpenShift 4.6.

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Transitioning from Docker to Podman

Transitioning from Docker to Podman

Podman is an excellent alternative to Docker containers when you need increased security, unique identifier (UID) separation using namespaces, and integration with systemd. In this article, I use real-world examples to show you how to install Podman, use its basic commands, and transition from the Docker command-line interface (CLI) to Podman. You’ll also see how to run an existing image with Podman and how to set up port forwarding.

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Using Multus and DataVolume in KubeVirt

Using Multus and DataVolume in KubeVirt

KubeVirt is a cloud-native virtual machine management framework based on Kubernetes. KubeVirt orchestrates workloads running on virtual machines in the same way that Kubernetes does for containers. KubeVirt has many features for managing the network, storage, images, and the virtual machine itself. This article focuses on two mechanisms for configuring network and storage requirements: Multus-CNI and CDI DataVolumes. You will learn how to configure these KubeVirt features for use cases that require high performance, security, and scalability.

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Event-driven serverless applications with Camel K

Event-driven serverless applications with Camel K

DevNation Tech Talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions plus code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about event-driven serverless applications and Apache Camel K from Nicola Ferraro, Luca Burgazzoli, and Burr Sutter.

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Devfiles and Kubernetes cluster support in OpenShift Connector 0.2.0 extension for VS Code

Devfiles and Kubernetes cluster support in OpenShift Connector 0.2.0 extension for VS Code

We are pleased to announce that the new release of the OpenShift Connector extension for Visual Studio Code (VS Code) is now available. The 0.2.0 release offers new features for rapidly developing and deploying code on Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift clusters. OpenShift Connector now supports component deployment using devfiles, leveraging odo 2.0 command-line interface under the hood.

With this release, the extension now supports connecting to vanilla Kubernetes clusters and includes a new option for creating OpenShift 4 clusters locally via Red Hat CodeReady Containers (CRC). In this article, we introduce these new features and present the workflow for using CodeReady Containers with OpenShift Connector 0.2.0.

Install OpenShift Connector 0.2.0

  1. Install the OpenShift Connector plug-in directly from the Visual Studio Code Marketplace.
  2. Alternatively, select the Extensions view in VS Code by clicking on its square icon in the left-side taskbar. Search for the OpenShift Connector plug-in and click Install.
  3. Once you have installed the extension, the OpenShift icon will be added to the left-side activity bar and ready for use.

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How I built a serverless blog search with Java, Quarkus, and AWS Lambda

How I built a serverless blog search with Java, Quarkus, and AWS Lambda

DevNation Tech Talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions plus code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about serverless blog search with Java, Quarkus, and AWS Lambda from Gunnar Morling and Burr Sutter.

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Jakarta EE: Multitenancy with JPA on WildFly, Part 2

Jakarta EE: Multitenancy with JPA on WildFly, Part 2

This is the second half of a two-part article about multitenancy with the Jakarta Persistence API (JPA) on WildFly. In Part 1, I showed you how to implement multitenancy using a database. In Part 2, I’ll show you how to implement multitenancy using a schema and the Jakarta Persistence API (JPA) on WildFly. You’ll learn how to implement JPA’s CurrentTenantIdentifierResolver and MultiTenantConnectionProvider interfaces, and how to use JPA’s persistence.xml file to configure the required classes based on these interfaces.

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