Microservices

Integrating Spring Boot with Red Hat Integration Service Registry

Integrating Spring Boot with Red Hat Integration Service Registry

Most of the new cloud-native applications and microservices designs are based on event-driven architecture (EDA), responding to real-time information by sending and receiving information about individual events. This kind of architecture relies on asynchronous, non-blocking communication between event producers and consumers through an event streaming backbone such as Red Hat AMQ Streams running on top of Red Hat OpenShift. In scenarios where many different events are being managed, defining a governance model where each event is defined as an API is critical. That way, producers and consumers can produce and consume checked and validated events. We can use a service registry as a datastore for events defined as APIs.

From my field experience working with many clients, I’ve found the most typical architecture consists of the following components:

In this article, you will learn how to easily integrate your Spring Boot applications with Red Hat Integration Service Registry, which is based on the open source Apicurio Registry.

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Spring Boot on Quarkus: Magic or madness?

Spring Boot on Quarkus: Magic or madness?

Quarkus is a Java stack tailored for OpenJDK HotSpot (or OpenJ9 on zSeries) and GraalVM, crafted from optimized Java libraries and standards. It is a good choice for building highly-scalable applications while using lower amounts of CPU and memory resources than other Java frameworks. These applications can be traditional web applications, serverless applications, or even functions as a service.

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Develop Eclipse MicroProfile applications on Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform XP 2.0

Develop Eclipse MicroProfile applications on Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform XP 2.0

This article shows you how to install Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP) XP 2.0.0 GA with support for Eclipse MicroProfile. Once you’ve enabled Eclipse MicroProfile, you will be able to use its quickstart examples to start developing your own MicroProfile applications with Red Hat CodeReady Studio. In this demonstration, you’ll learn two ways to build and run the MicroProfile Config quickstart application.

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Supersonic, Subatomic gRPC services with Java and Quarkus

Supersonic, Subatomic gRPC services with Java and Quarkus

gRPC is an open source remote procedure call (RPC) framework. It was released by Google in 2015 and is now an incubating project within the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. This post introduces gRPC while explaining its underlying architecture and how it compares to REST over HTTP. You’ll also get started using Quarkus to implement and consume gRPC services.

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Build embedded cache clusters with Quarkus and Red Hat Data Grid

Build embedded cache clusters with Quarkus and Red Hat Data Grid

There are many ways to configure the cache in a microservices system. As a rule of thumb, you should use caching only in one place; for example, you should not use the cache in both the HTTP and application layers. Distributed caching both increases cloud-native application performance and minimizes the overhead of creating new microservices.

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Analyze monolithic Java applications in multiple workspaces with Red Hat’s migration toolkit for applications

Analyze monolithic Java applications in multiple workspaces with Red Hat’s migration toolkit for applications

Transforming monolithic Java applications into distributed, cloud-native microservices is never easy, but Red Hat’s migration toolkit for applications helps you understand and evaluate the migration path. As a developer, you can apply the following features to a broad range of transformation use cases:

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Open Liberty 20.0.0.12 brings support for gRPC, custom JNDI names, and Java SE 15

Open Liberty 20.0.0.12 brings support for gRPC, custom JNDI names, and Java SE 15

Open Liberty 20.0.0.12 now supports gRPC 1.0 and gRPC Client 1.0. This universal, open source framework is an efficient way to connect remote services across data centers. We’ve also added custom names support for the Java Naming and Directory Interface (JNDI), making it easier to look up and inject Jakarta Enterprise Beans (EJBs) in your Open Liberty applications. Finally, this new release is compatible with Java SE 15, the latest Java Standard Edition version. We’ll introduce these features and show you how to set up and configure the new gRPC and custom JNDI names support in Open Liberty 20.0.0.12.

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Using IntelliJ Community Edition in Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.5

Using IntelliJ Community Edition in Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.5

Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces (CRW) provides a default browser-based IDE to be used with developer workspaces. However, the architecture is flexible for using other IDEs such as Jupyter Notebooks and Eclipse Dirigible. In this article, you will learn how to create a custom workspace using the community edition of IntelliJ IDEA.

Note: You can also apply the instructions in this article to create a free, self-service Eclipse Che workspace hosted at che.openshift.io.

Creating a custom workspace in CodeReady Workspaces

We will start with the procedure for creating a custom workspace in a connected CodeReady Workspaces environment. See the next section for instructions to set up a custom workspace in an air-gapped environment.

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