JavaScript

Deploying serverless Node.js applications on Red Hat OpenShift, Part 1

Deploying serverless Node.js applications on Red Hat OpenShift, Part 1

Red Hat OpenShift Serverless recently became GA, and with it came new options for application deployment. This article introduces one of those new options, Knative Serving. I provide an overview of OpenShift Serverless and Knative Serving, then show you how to deploy a Node.js application as a Knative Serving service.

What is OpenShift Serverless?

According to the OpenShift Serverless GA release:

OpenShift Serverless enables developers to build what they want, when they want, with whatever tools and languages they need. Developers can quickly get their applications up and deployed using serverless compute, and they won’t have to build and maintain larger container images to do so.

OpenShift Serverless is based on the Knative open source Kubernetes serverless project. While it has a few different parts, we will focus on deploying a serverless Node.js application as a Knative Serving service.

Continue reading “Deploying serverless Node.js applications on Red Hat OpenShift, Part 1”

Share
Vulnerability analysis with Red Hat CodeReady Dependency Analytics and Snyk Intel

Vulnerability analysis with Red Hat CodeReady Dependency Analytics and Snyk Intel

Red Hat CodeReady Dependency Analytics is a hosted service on OpenShift that provides vulnerability and compliance analysis for your applications, directly from your IDE. It automatically analyzes your software composition and provides recommendations to address security holes and licensing issues. The 0.1 release of CodeReady Dependency Analytics includes access to the Snyk Intel Vulnerability Database, which is a curated database of both unique and known open source software security advisories.

Continue reading Vulnerability analysis with Red Hat CodeReady Dependency Analytics and Snyk Intel

Share
A developer-centered approach to application development

A developer-centered approach to application development

Do you dream of a local development environment that’s easy to configure and works independently from the software layers that you are currently not working on? I do!

As a software engineer, I have suffered the pain of starting projects that were not easy to configure. Reading the technical documentation does not help when much of it is outdated, or even worse, missing many steps. I have lost hours of my life trying to understand why my local development environment was not working.

An ideal scenario

As a developer, you have to meet a few prerequisites before contributing to a project. For instance, you must agree to the version-control requirements, and you need to know how to use the project IDE, how to use a package manager, and so on.

But nothing more. You don’t need to learn a poorly documented, made-in-house framework just to satisfy the ego of an architect who wanted to reinvent the wheel. You don’t need to run an external virtual machine to emulate the production environment. As a developer, you are free to invest your time in improving the code and adding value to the product.

A developer-centered approach to application development

My goal with this article is to describe strategies for building an Angular 8 application in a way that centers the developer experience.

Continue reading “A developer-centered approach to application development”

Share
Use Node.js 14 on Red Hat OpenShift

Use Node.js 14 on Red Hat OpenShift

On April 21st, Node.js released its latest major version with Node.js 14. Because this is an even-numbered release, it will become a Long Term Support (LTS) release in October 2020. This release brings a host of improvements and features, such as improved diagnostics, a V8 upgrade, an experimental Async Local Storage API, hardened the streams APIs, and more.

While Red Hat will release a Universal Base Image (UBI) for Node.js 14 in the coming months for Red Hat OpenShift and Red Hat Enterprise Linux, this article helps you get started today. If you’re interested in more about Node.js 14’s improvements and new features, check out the article listed at the end.

Continue reading “Use Node.js 14 on Red Hat OpenShift”

Share
Contract-first development: Create a mock back end for realistic data interactions with React

Contract-first development: Create a mock back end for realistic data interactions with React

Many front-end developers are discovering the benefits of contract-first development. With this approach, front- and back-end developers use OpenAPI to collaboratively design an API specification. Once the initial specification is done, front-end developers can use API definitions and sample data to develop discrete user interface (UI) components. Defining a single OpenAPI spec improves cross-team collaboration, and API definitions empower front-end developers to design our initial workflows without relying on the back end.

Continue reading Contract-first development: Create a mock back end for realistic data interactions with React

Share
Getting started with JavaScript application development

Getting started with JavaScript application development

For many developers who have never built a JavaScript web application before, the first steps can be daunting. Our development team has the opportunity to interact with both students that are just getting started and developers with lengthy experience building out complex applications. Even seasoned back-end developers often ask where they can get started with JavaScript. Our response is invariably, “Don’t just read. You need to start building things, play with the language to see what it can do.”

JavaScript frameworks

Many times they also ask, “Which framework should I learn?” JavaScript frameworks like Angular, Vue, or React generate a lot of excitement, but they confuse the picture of where to start. At this stage, many developers might not want to choose a framework at all, so that they don’t lock themselves into a specific technology. If you wonder about these same things, you’re not alone. Fortunately, there are plenty of free resources to help you get started with learning how to build enterprise-quality JavaScript applications.

Continue reading “Getting started with JavaScript application development”

Share
API login and JWT token generation using Keycloak

API login and JWT token generation using Keycloak

Red Hat single sign-on (SSO)—or its open source version, Keycloak—is one of the leading products for web SSO capabilities, and is based on popular standards such as Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML) 2.0, OpenID Connect, and OAuth 2.0. One of Red Hat SSO’s strongest features is that we can access Keycloak directly in many ways, whether through a simple HTML login form, or an API call. In the following scenario, we will generate a JWT token and then validate it. Everything will be done using API calls, so Keycloak’s UI is not exposed to the public directly.

Continue reading “API login and JWT token generation using Keycloak”

Share