JavaScript

Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 2 — Using chained builds

Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 2 — Using chained builds

In the previous post, we took a quick look at a new source-to-image (S2I) builder image designed for building and deploying modern web applications on OpenShift. While the last post was focused on getting your app deployed quickly, this post will look at how to use the S2I image as a “pure” builder image and combine it with an OpenShift chained build.

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Modern Web Applications on OpenShift: Part 1 – Web apps in two commands

Modern Web Applications on OpenShift: Part 1 – Web apps in two commands

In this multi-part series, we will take a look at how to deploy modern web applications, like React and Angular apps, to Red Hat OpenShift using a new source-to-image (S2I) builder image.  Series overview:

  • Part 1 – how to deploy modern web apps using the fewest steps.
  • Part 2 – how to combine this new S2I image with a current HTTP server image, like NGINX, using an OpenShift chained build for a more production-ready deployment.
  • Part 3 – The last post will show how to run your app’s development server on OpenShift while syncing with your local file system.

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How to Debug Your Node.js Application on OpenShift with Chrome DevTools

How to Debug Your Node.js Application on OpenShift with Chrome DevTools

Recently, I wrote a post called Zero to Express on OpenShift in Three Commands, which shows how to get started using Node.js, Express, and OpenShift together as fast as possible using the Node.js s2i (source-to-image) images that were recently released as part of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR).

This post will add to the last one and show how we can start to debug and inspect our running code using the Chrome Developer Tools (DevTools) inspector.

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Announcing: Node.js General Availability in Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Announcing: Node.js General Availability in Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Node.js Foundation Logo

Summary

Today Red Hat is making Node.js generally available to Red Hat customers through a subscription to Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR). RHOAR provides application developers with a variety of application runtimes running on the OpenShift Container Platform.

Node.js is based on the V8 JavaScript engine and allows you to write server-side JavaScript applications. Node.js joins the existing set of supported runtimes and offers developers an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.

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3scale ActiveDocs and OAuth 2.0

3scale ActiveDocs and OAuth 2.0

This guide is designed to help you integrate your Red Hat Single Sign-On server with the OpenAPI (OAI)-based ActiveDocs in your 3scale developer portal. Although it has only been implemented with this particular Identity & Access Management solution (IAM), you could in theory make some customizations where necessary to integrate with another OpenID Connect-based solution.

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Whisking Functions with Promises using OpenWhisk

Whisking Functions with Promises using OpenWhisk

Over the past few weeks I have been learning and enhancing my skills around the new buzz word “serverless” and trying to understand what this buzz is all about.  As an ardent open-source developer, I was looking for a platform where I can develop and deploy the serverless functions, which is when I stumbled upon Apache OpenWhisk.

In this blog I will demonstrate how to build a simple nodejs function that can do reverse geocoding using Google Maps API, and how to deploy the functions on to Apache OpenWhisk.

The context is to show building an Apache OpenWhisk JavaScript action, which involves a callback.  As most of us are familiar with Google Maps API (which has lots of callbacks), it provides a good example for this blog.

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The State of Microservices Survey 2017 – Eight trends you need to know

During the fall of 2017, we conducted a microservices survey with our Red Hat Middleware and Red Hat OpenShift customers. Here are eight interesting trends discerned by the results:

I. Microservices are being used to re-architect existing applications as much as for brand new projects

There seems to be a strong emphasis in the market by technology vendors for positioning microservices as being only for new projects.  However, our survey reveals that organizations are also using microservices to re-architect existing and legacy applications.

Sixty-seven percent of Red Hat Middleware customers and 79 percent of Red Hat OpenShift customers indicated this. This data tells us that microservices offer value to users all along their IT transformation journey — whether they are just looking to update their current application portfolio or are gearing up new initiatives. So, if you are only focused on greenfield projects for microservices, it may be a good idea to also start evaluating your existing applications for a microservice re-architecture analysis. Microservices introduce a set of benefits that our customers have already started seeing, and they are applying these benefits not just to new projects but to existing ones as well.

II. Customers prefer a multi-runtime/multi-technology/multi-framework approach for microservices

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Accelerating the development of Node.js using OpenShift

Accelerating the development of Node.js using OpenShift

In this blog entry, I want to introduce a “different” way to work with OpenShift. In the typical way to deploy a Pod to OpenShift, we have available a set of very useful objects we have build/image configurations. This takes the pain from us by hiding the details about image construction but, sometimes we just want to see some code running in the cloud. Or we want to see if our service/application is able to interact with nearby services or we have some code but we don’t want to use a git repo just yet. To solve that problem, I will show the concept of InitContainers, and how by being a little bit creative we achieve some cool stuff like deploying our code inside a running container.

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