JavaScript

Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 3 — Openshift as a development environment

Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 3 — Openshift as a development environment

Welcome back to the final part of this multipart series about deploying modern web applications on Red Hat OpenShift. In the first post, we took a look at how to deploy a modern web application using the fewest commands.

In the second part, we took a deeper look into how the new source-to-image (S2I) web app builder works and how to use it as part of a chained build.

This third and final part will take a look at how you can run your app’s “development workflow” on OpenShift.

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Monitoring Node.js Applications on OpenShift with Prometheus

Monitoring Node.js Applications on OpenShift with Prometheus

Observability is Key

One of the great things about Node.js is how well it performs in a container. Its fast start up time, and relatively small size make it a favorite for microservice applications on OpenShift. But with this shift to containerized deployments comes some complexity. As a result, monitoring Node.js applications can be difficult. At times it seems as though the performance and behavior of our applications become opaque to us. So what can we do to find and address issues in our services before they become a problem? We need to enhance observability by monitoring the state of our services.

Instrumentation

Instrumentation of our applications is one way to increase observability. Therefore, in this article, I will demonstrate the instrumentation of a Node.js application using Prometheus.

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Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 2 — Using chained builds

Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 2 — Using chained builds

In the previous article, we took a quick look at a new source-to-image (S2I) builder image designed for building and deploying modern web applications on OpenShift. While the last article was focused on getting your app deployed quickly, this article will look at how to use the S2I image as a “pure” builder image and combine it with an OpenShift chained build.

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Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 1 — Web apps in two commands

Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 1 — Web apps in two commands

In this multi-part series, we will take a look at how to deploy modern web applications, like React and Angular apps, to Red Hat OpenShift using a new source-to-image (S2I) builder image.

Series overview:

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How to Debug Your Node.js Application on OpenShift with Chrome DevTools

How to Debug Your Node.js Application on OpenShift with Chrome DevTools

Recently, I wrote a post called Zero to Express on OpenShift in Three Commands, which shows how to get started using Node.js, Express, and OpenShift together as fast as possible using the Node.js s2i (source-to-image) images that were recently released as part of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR).

This post will add to the last one and show how we can start to debug and inspect our running code using the Chrome Developer Tools (DevTools) inspector.

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Announcing: Node.js General Availability in Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Announcing: Node.js General Availability in Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Node.js Foundation Logo

Summary

Today Red Hat is making Node.js generally available to Red Hat customers through a subscription to Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR). RHOAR provides application developers with a variety of application runtimes running on the OpenShift Container Platform.

Node.js is based on the V8 JavaScript engine and allows you to write server-side JavaScript applications. Node.js joins the existing set of supported runtimes and offers developers an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.

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3scale ActiveDocs and OAuth 2.0

3scale ActiveDocs and OAuth 2.0

This guide is designed to help you integrate your Red Hat Single Sign-On server with the OpenAPI (OAI)-based ActiveDocs in your 3scale developer portal. Although it has only been implemented with this particular Identity & Access Management solution (IAM), you could in theory make some customizations where necessary to integrate with another OpenID Connect-based solution.

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Whisking Functions with Promises using OpenWhisk

Whisking Functions with Promises using OpenWhisk

Over the past few weeks I have been learning and enhancing my skills around the new buzz word “serverless” and trying to understand what this buzz is all about.  As an ardent open-source developer, I was looking for a platform where I can develop and deploy the serverless functions, which is when I stumbled upon Apache OpenWhisk.

In this blog I will demonstrate how to build a simple nodejs function that can do reverse geocoding using Google Maps API, and how to deploy the functions on to Apache OpenWhisk.

The context is to show building an Apache OpenWhisk JavaScript action, which involves a callback.  As most of us are familiar with Google Maps API (which has lots of callbacks), it provides a good example for this blog.

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