JavaScript

Containerize and deploy Strapi applications on Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift

Containerize and deploy Strapi applications on Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift

Strapi is the leading open-source headless content management system (CMS). It’s 100% JavaScript, fully customizable, and takes a developer-first approach. Strapi provides you with an interface to create and manage all the resources for your website. You can then build a front end to connect to your Strapi API with your favorite tools and frameworks. Content editors can use the friendly administration panel to manage and distribute content. Strapi is also based on a plugin system, which makes the CMS flexible and extensible.

Continue reading Containerize and deploy Strapi applications on Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift

Share
Monitor Node.js applications on Red Hat OpenShift with Prometheus

Monitor Node.js applications on Red Hat OpenShift with Prometheus

A great thing about Node.js is how well it performs inside a container. With the shift to containerized deployments and environments comes extra complexity. One such complexity is observing what’s going on within your application and its resources, and when resource use is outside of the expected norms.

Continue reading Monitor Node.js applications on Red Hat OpenShift with Prometheus

Share
Deploying Node.js applications to Kubernetes with Nodeshift and Minikube

Deploying Node.js applications to Kubernetes with Nodeshift and Minikube

In a previous article, I showed how easy it was to deploy a Node.js application during development to Red Hat OpenShift using the Nodeshift command-line interface (CLI). In this article, we will take a look at using Nodeshift to deploy Node.js applications to vanilla Kubernetes—specifically, with Minikube.

Continue reading Deploying Node.js applications to Kubernetes with Nodeshift and Minikube

Share
Introduction to the Node.js reference architecture, Part 1: Overview

Introduction to the Node.js reference architecture, Part 1: Overview

Welcome to this new series introducing the Node.js reference architecture from Red Hat and IBM. This article is an overview of our reasons for developing the Node.js reference architecture—both what we hope the architecture will offer our developer community and what we do not intend it to do. Future articles will offer a detailed look at different sections of the reference architecture.

Continue reading Introduction to the Node.js reference architecture, Part 1: Overview

Share
Making environment variables accessible in front-end containers

Making environment variables accessible in front-end containers

When building a container for a single-page application using any modern JavaScript framework (such as Angular, React, or Vue.js), you might find that the configuration settings are different depending on where the container will run. A typical case would be the base URL for your API, which will differ depending on whether you are testing the application or deploying it into production. Developers usually solve this problem using environment variables.

Continue reading Making environment variables accessible in front-end containers

Share
Building rootless containers for JavaScript front ends

Building rootless containers for JavaScript front ends

By default, most containers are run as the root user. It is much easier to install dependencies, edit files, and run processes on restricted ports when they run as root. As is usually the case in computer science, though, simplicity comes at a cost. In this case, containers run as root are more vulnerable to malicious code and attacks. To avoid those potential security gaps, Red Hat OpenShift won’t let you run containers as a root user. This restriction adds a layer of security and isolates the containers.

Continue reading Building rootless containers for JavaScript front ends

Share