Spring Boot

Autoscaling Red Hat Fuse applications with OpenShift

Autoscaling Red Hat Fuse applications with OpenShift

In this article, we demonstrate Red Hat OpenShift’s horizontal autoscaling feature with Red Hat Fuse applications. The result is a Spring Boot-based application that uses the Apache Camel component twitter-search that searches Twitter for tweets based on specific keywords. If traffic or the number of tweets increases, and this application cannot serve all requests, then the application autoscales itself by increasing the number of pods. The ability to serve all requests is monitored by tracking this application’s CPU utilization on a particular pod. Also, as soon as traffic or CPU utilization is back to normal, the number of pods is reduced to the minimum configured value.

There are two types of scaling: horizontal and vertical. Horizontal scaling is where the number of application instances or containers is increased. Vertical scaling is where system resources like CPU and memory are increased at the running application’s or container’s runtime. Horizontal scaling can be used for stateless applications, whereas vertical scaling is more suitable for stateful applications.

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Autowire MicroProfile into Spring with Quarkus

Autowire MicroProfile into Spring with Quarkus

Eclipse MicroProfile and Spring Boot are often thought of as separate and distinct APIs when developing Java microservices. Developers default to their mental muscle memory by leveraging the APIs that they use on a daily basis. Learning new frameworks and runtimes can be a significant time investment. This article aims to ease the introduction to some popular MicroProfile APIs for Spring developers by enabling them to utilize the Spring APIs they already know while benefiting from significant new capabilities offered by Quarkus.

More specifically, this article covers the scope and details of the Spring APIs supported by Quarkus so Spring developers have a grasp of the foundation they can build on with MicroProfile APIs. The article then covers MicroProfile APIs that Spring developers will find helpful in the development of microservices. Only a subset of MicroProfile is covered.

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Extending support for Spring Boot 2.1.6 and Spring Reactive

Extending support for Spring Boot 2.1.6 and Spring Reactive

Red Hat Application Runtimes recently added extended support for the Spring Boot 2.1.6 runtime for Red Hat customers building Spring apps. Red Hat Application Runtimes provides application developers with a variety of application runtimes running on the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform.

Introduction to Spring Boot

Spring Boot lets you create opinionated Spring-based standalone applications. The Spring Boot runtime also integrates with the OpenShift platform, allowing your services to externalize their configuration, implement health checks, provide resiliency and failover, and much more.

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Reactive Spring Boot programming with Vert.x

Reactive Spring Boot programming with Vert.x

The latest bundle of Red Hat supported Spring Boot starters was recently released. In addition to supporting the popular Red Hat products for our Spring Boot customers, the Red Hat Spring Boot team was also busy creating new ones. The most recent technical preview added is a group of Eclipse Vert.x Spring Boot starters, which provide a Spring-native vocabulary for the popular JVM reactive toolkit.

Let’s quickly go through the main concepts to get everybody on the same page before looking into an example.

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Optimizing Red Hat Fuse 7 Spring Boot container images

Optimizing Red Hat Fuse 7 Spring Boot container images

Working with Red Hat Fuse 7 on Spring Boot is straightforward. In my field experience, I have seen many development (a.k.a. integrator) teams moving to Fuse 7 on Spring Boot for their new integration platforms on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (well aligned with agile integration).

Lately, however, I have also seen some teams worried about the size of the final images and the deployment pipeline. In most cases, they had developed a set of common libraries or frameworks to extend or to homogenize the final integration projects. All the cases have the same result:

  • Several dependencies copied in each integration project
  • Always replacing the container images with the latest fat JAR (including the same dependencies) in each build pipeline

Spring Boot is usually packaged as “fat JARS” that contain all runtime dependencies. Although this is quite convenient, because you only need a JRE and a single JAR to run the application, in a container environment such as Red Hat OpenShift, you have to build a full container image to deploy your application.

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What Red Hat OpenShift Connector for JetBrains products offers developers

What Red Hat OpenShift Connector for JetBrains products offers developers

We are extremely pleased to announce that the preview release of the Red Hat OpenShift Connector for JetBrains products (IntelliJ IDEA, WebStorm, etc.) is now available in Preview Mode and supports Java and Node.js components. You can download the OpenShift Connector plugin from the JetBrains marketplace or install it directly from the plugins gallery in JetBrains products.

In this article, we’ll look at features and benefits of the plugin and installation details, and show a demo of how using the plugin improves the end-to-end experience of developing and deploying Spring Boot applications to your OpenShift cluster.

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Extending support to Spring Boot 2.x for Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Extending support to Spring Boot 2.x for Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

What Red Hat is providing

Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR) is a recommended set of products, tools, and components for developing and maintaining cloud-native applications on the Red Hat OpenShift platform. As part of this offering, Red Hat is extending its support to Spring Boot 2 and related frameworks for building modern, production-grade, Java-based cloud-native applications.

Spring Boot lets you create opinionated Spring-based standalone applications. The Spring Boot runtime also integrates with the OpenShift platform, allowing your services to externalize their configuration, implement health checks, provide resiliency and failover, and much more. To learn more about how Spring Boot applications integrate with the wider Red Hat portfolio, check out the following OpenShift Commons Briefing by Thomas Qvarnstrom:

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Good news: Business automation is not about SOA

Good news: Business automation is not about SOA

This is not an article about service-oriented architecture (SOA); neither is it a business process management (BPM) article. This article is about how business automation can change the way you create software.

At a first, developers and architects tend to associate the use of BPM suites (or business-oriented architecture) with SOA. This behavior immediately leads to an incorrect bias about the subject.

C-suite executives understand: Transform—or be suppressed by new, disruptive, technology-driven startups. In 2019, business automation is a key transformation that executives will seek in order to improve business performance and lower costs. However, some technology teams are not very open to it. Why?

In the past, BPM suites have been used as big centralized orchestrators for services, external systems, and human tasks. JBoss SOA Platform, released in 2008, is an example of such an integration platform. Unfortunately, this kind of application does not fit new cloud- and microservices-oriented architectures. The good news is that business automation evolved and can help teams to reach the next step in DevOps: BizDevOps.

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Using VS Code to develop Spring Boot-based Camel and Red Hat Fuse projects

Using VS Code to develop Spring Boot-based Camel and Red Hat Fuse projects

Developing Apache Camel and Red Hat Fuse applications inside VS Code is improving! In my previous articles, I’ve mentioned that Camel URI completion is available in VS Code for XML and Java DSL. By leveraging several VS Code extensions, it is now possible to have an end-to-end development experience. The Camel tooling currently available in VS Code is primarily targeting Spring Boot– based Camel applications. The tooling covers the development process from creating a Camel project, testing, and debugging it locally, to automatically-rebuilding and redeploying it on your local OpenShift/Kubernetes instance when you make changes.

There are several ways to leverage the VS Code tooling. I will show the process which I believe is the easiest one to get started with.

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