Windows

Why Windows and Linux line endings don’t line up (and how to fix it)

Why Windows and Linux line endings don’t line up (and how to fix it)

I recently wrote a few automated database-populating scripts. Specifically, I am running Microsoft SQL Server in a container in a Kubernetes cluster—okay, it’s Red Hat OpenShift, but it’s still Kubernetes. It was all fun and games until I started mixing Windows and Linux; I was developing on my Windows machine, but obviously the container is running Linux. That’s when I got the gem of an error shown in Figure 1. Well, not so much an error as errant output.

Weird line endings in SQL statement output.

Figure 1: Errant output from an SQL statement.

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Containerize .NET for Red Hat OpenShift: Use a Windows VM like a container

Containerize .NET for Red Hat OpenShift: Use a Windows VM like a container

Embracing the future—making the transition from legacy monolithic applications running on .NET Framework to microservices and images running in containers (or pods)—is a tall task. If only there were a safe, proceed-at-your-own-pace way to make the change, one that was familiar yet led to a new destination. Of course, there is such a path; otherwise, I wouldn’t be writing this article. In this article, the last in my series introducing three ways to containerize .NET applications on Red Hat OpenShift, we’ll look at running Windows virtual machines (VMs) on OpenShift, and treating them like containers.

In case you missed them, here are the two other articles in the “Containerize .NET for Red Hat OpenShift” series:

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Containerize .NET for Red Hat OpenShift: Windows containers and .NET Framework

Containerize .NET for Red Hat OpenShift: Windows containers and .NET Framework

Developers who use and target Microsoft’s .NET Framework are no longer outsiders looking in when it comes to developing container-based applications. Whether porting an existing application (for example, a website running in IIS) or creating a new microservice, or somewhere in between, it is now possible—thanks to Windows containers—to deploy .NET Framework applications to your Kubernetes or Red Hat OpenShift clusters. This article explores the option of running .NET Framework applications in Windows containers in OpenShift clusters.

Note: This article is part of a series introducing three ways to containerize .NET applications on Red Hat OpenShift. The previous article introduced Linux containers for .NET Core.

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No more Java in vscode-xml 0.15.0!

No more Java in vscode-xml 0.15.0!

Among other improvements and bug fixes in the vscode-xml extension 0.15.0 release, you can now run the extension without needing Java. We know the Java requirement discouraged many people from trying the extension. We have included a new setting, Prefer Binary (xml.server.preferBinary) that lets you choose between the Java server and the new binary server. We’re excited to remove the Java restriction from Red Hat’s XML extension for Visual Studio Code in vscode-xml 0.15.0. Keep reading to find out how we did it.

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How Red Hat ported OpenJDK to 64-bit Arm: A community history

How Red Hat ported OpenJDK to 64-bit Arm: A community history

It has been quite a year for Arm Ltd., the firm that designs reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors. The news that Arm-based computers will be important for the foreseeable future has even reached the mainstream media. At the end of 2019, Amazon Web Services announced Arm-based Graviton2 servers. In June 2020, Apple announced its plans to move Macintosh computers over to Apple silicon—which means Arm.

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Support for IBM Power Systems and more with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.5

Support for IBM Power Systems and more with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.5

Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.5 is now available. This article introduces support for IBM Power Systems and the new single-host mode in CodeReady Workspaces 2.5. We also briefly discuss support for Red Hat OpenShift 4.6 and language updates in this release.

Note: CodeReady Workspaces 2.5 is available on Red Hat OpenShift 3.11 and Red Hat OpenShift 4.5 and higher.

About CodeReady Workspaces

CodeReady Workspaces (CRW) is based on Eclipse Che, an open source project. CodeReady Workspaces significantly improves developer productivity with near-instant onboarding and consistent, production-like development environments. Developers can use CodeReady Workspaces for cloud-native development on Red Hat OpenShift and other types of development.

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Kubectl: Developer tips for the Kubernetes command line

Kubectl: Developer tips for the Kubernetes command line

Kubectl, the Kubernetes command-line interface (CLI), has more capabilities than many developers realize. For example, did you know that kubectl can reach the Kubernetes API while running inside a cluster? You can also use kubectl to assume different user identities, to select a custom editor to run with the kubectl edit command, and more.

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