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Managing JBoss EAP/Wildfly using Jcliff

Managing JBoss EAP/Wildfly using Jcliff

Systems management can be a difficult task. Not only does one need to determine what the end state should be but, more importantly, how to ensure systems attain and remain at this state. Doing so in an automated fashion is just as critical, because there may be a large number of target instances. In regard to enterprise Java middleware application servers, these instances are typically configured using a set of XML based files. Although these files may be manually configured, most application servers have a command-line based tool or set of tools that abstracts the end user from having to worry about the underlying configuration. WebSphere Liberty includes a variety of tools to manage these resources, whereas JBoss contains the jboss-cli tool.

Although each tool accomplishes its utilitarian use case as it allows for proper server management, it does fail to adhere to one of the principles of automation and configuration management: idempotence. Ensuring the desired state does not equate to executing the same action with every iteration. Additional intelligence must be introduced. Along with idempotence, another core principle of configuration management is that values be expressed declaratively and stored in a version control system.

Jcliff is a Java-based utility that is built on top of the JBoss command-line interface and allows for the desired intent for the server configuration to be expressed declaratively, which in turn can be stored in a version control system. We’ll provide an overview of the Jcliff utility including inherent benefits, installation options, and several examples showcasing the use.

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Command-line tools for Kubernetes: kubectl, stern, kubectx, kubens

Command-line tools for Kubernetes: kubectl, stern, kubectx, kubens

If you’ve ever worked with your hands, you know that you can’t do the job right without the right tools. That adage carries over quite well to software development as well. The right tools can make the difference between success or failure, regardless of the underlying technology. In the Kubernetes ecosystem, more and more tools are being introduced as folks find ways to solve a common problem. This article looks are four of those tools.

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How to run systemd in a container

How to run systemd in a container

I have been talking about systemd in a container for a long time. Way back in 2014, I wrote “Running systemd within a Docker Container.” And, a couple of years later, I wrote another article, “Running systemd in a non-privileged container,” explaining how things hadn’t gotten much better. In that article, I stated, “Sadly, two years later if you google Docker systemd, this is still the article people see—it’s time for an update.” I also linked to a talk about how upstream Docker and upstream systemd would not compromise. In this article, I’ll look at the progress that’s been made and how Podman can help.

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Red Hat OpenShift 4.0 Developer Preview on AWS: Up and running with Windows

Red Hat OpenShift 4.0 Developer Preview on AWS: Up and running with Windows

In a previous article, “OpenShift 4.0 Developer Preview on AWS is up and running” I included instructions for using macOS or Linux to install and manage your Red Hat OpenShift 4.0 cluster. Since I recently added a Windows 10 PC to my technology mix, I decided to try to use Windows as my only choice.

I was saddened to learn that the installer, openshift-install, isn’t available for Windows. But, like any developer who won’t be denied; I found a way.

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How to set up your first Kubernetes environment on Windows

How to set up your first Kubernetes environment on Windows

You’ve crushed the whole containers thing—it was much easier than you anticipated, and you’ve updated your resume. Now it’s time to move into the spotlight, walk the red carpet, and own the whole Kubernetes game. In this blog post, we’ll get our Kubernetes environment up and running on Windows 10, spin up an image in a container, and drop the mic on our way out the door—headed to Coderland.

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How to set up your first Kubernetes environment on macOS

How to set up your first Kubernetes environment on macOS

By following my previous article in this series, you’ve crushed the whole containers thing. It was much easier than you anticipated, and you’ve updated your resume. Now it’s time to move into the spotlight, walk the red carpet, and own the whole Kubernetes game. In this blog post, we’ll get our Kubernetes environment up and running on macOS, spin up an image in a container, and head to Coderland.

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From zero to Quarkus and Knative: The easy way

From zero to Quarkus and Knative: The easy way

You’ve probably already read about Quarkus, but you may not know that the superfast startup speed of Quarkus makes it the best candidate for working with Knative and serverless for your Function-as-a-Service (FaaS) projects.

Quarkus, also known as Supersonic, Subatomic Java, is a Kubernetes native Java stack tailored for GraalVM and OpenJDK HotSpot, crafted from the best-of-breed Java libraries and standards. Knative is a Kubernetes-based platform to build, deploy, and manage modern serverless workloads. You can learn more in this article series.

This article does not provide a full deep dive on Knative or Quarkus. Instead, I aim to give you a quick and easy way to start playing with both technologies so you can further explore on your own.

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What Red Hat OpenShift Connector for JetBrains products offers developers

What Red Hat OpenShift Connector for JetBrains products offers developers

We are extremely pleased to announce that the preview release of the Red Hat OpenShift Connector for JetBrains products (IntelliJ IDEA, WebStorm, etc.) is now available in Preview Mode and supports Java and Node.js components. You can download the OpenShift Connector plugin from the JetBrains marketplace or install it directly from the plugins gallery in JetBrains products.

In this article, we’ll look at features and benefits of the plugin and installation details, and show a demo of how using the plugin improves the end-to-end experience of developing and deploying Spring Boot applications to your OpenShift cluster.

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The evolution of serverless and FaaS: Knative brings change

The evolution of serverless and FaaS: Knative brings change

Are serverless and Function as a Service (FaaS) the same thing?

No, they’re not.

Wait. Yes, they are.

Frustrating, right? With terms being thrown about at conferences, in articles (I’m looking at myself right now), conversations, etc., things can be confusing (or, sadly, sometimes misleading). Let’s take a look at some aspects of serverless and FaaS to see where things stand.

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