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How Red Hat ported OpenJDK to 64-bit Arm: A community history

How Red Hat ported OpenJDK to 64-bit Arm: A community history

It has been quite a year for Arm Ltd., the firm that designs reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors. The news that Arm-based computers will be important for the foreseeable future has even reached the mainstream media. At the end of 2019, Amazon Web Services announced Arm-based Graviton2 servers. In June 2020, Apple announced its plans to move Macintosh computers over to Apple silicon—which means Arm.

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Support for IBM Power Systems and more with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.5

Support for IBM Power Systems and more with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.5

Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.5 is now available. This article introduces support for IBM Power Systems and the new single-host mode in CodeReady Workspaces 2.5. We also briefly discuss support for Red Hat OpenShift 4.6 and language updates in this release.

Note: CodeReady Workspaces 2.5 is available on Red Hat OpenShift 3.11 and Red Hat OpenShift 4.5 and higher.

About CodeReady Workspaces

CodeReady Workspaces (CRW) is based on Eclipse Che, an open source project. CodeReady Workspaces significantly improves developer productivity with near-instant onboarding and consistent, production-like development environments. Developers can use CodeReady Workspaces for cloud-native development on Red Hat OpenShift and other types of development.

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Kubectl: Developer tips for the Kubernetes command line

Kubectl: Developer tips for the Kubernetes command line

Kubectl, the Kubernetes command-line interface (CLI), has more capabilities than many developers realize. For example, did you know that kubectl can reach the Kubernetes API while running inside a cluster? You can also use kubectl to assume different user identities, to select a custom editor to run with the kubectl edit command, and more.

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Smart cards support in libssh

Smart cards support in libssh

In computer security, software implementations of cryptographic algorithms are vulnerable to side-channel attacks. This type of attack seeks to glean information from the computer system rather than from the program that it is running. As examples, Spectre and Meltdown are both side-channel attacks that target the microarchitecture of modern processors. Microarchitectural attacks are only a subset of all side-channel attacks. There are many others that leak sensitive secret information.

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Using Microsoft SQL Server on Red Hat OpenShift

Using Microsoft SQL Server on Red Hat OpenShift

In this article, you’ll learn how to deploy Microsoft SQL Server 2019 on Red Hat OpenShift. We’ll then use SQL Server from an ASP.NET Core application that is also deployed on OpenShift. Next, I’ll show you how to connect to SQL Server while working on the application from your local development machine. And finally, we’ll connect to the server using Azure Data Studio.

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How to run Red Hat CodeReady Containers on Windows 10 Enterprise

How to run Red Hat CodeReady Containers on Windows 10 Enterprise

Red Hat CodeReady Containers allows you to spin up a small Red Hat OpenShift cluster on your local PC, without the need for a server, a cloud, or a team of operations people. For developers who want to get started immediately with cloud-native development, containers, and Kubernetes (as well as OpenShift), it’s a simple and slick tool. It runs on macOS, Linux, and all versions of Windows 10.

Except for Windows 10 Enterprise.

Which I painfully learned.

Because I lazily didn’t pay attention to the documentation.

OK, so I’m the only developer who glosses over documentation. Fortunately for you, I struggled and managed to get CRC running on my Windows 10 Enterprise notebook computer, and this article explains what is involved to get it working. So, in a sense, you’re welcome that I’m lazy.

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Install Red Hat OpenShift Operators on your laptop using Red Hat CodeReady Containers and Red Hat Marketplace

Install Red Hat OpenShift Operators on your laptop using Red Hat CodeReady Containers and Red Hat Marketplace

Red Hat CodeReady Containers (CRC) is the quickest way for developers to get started with clusters on Red Hat OpenShift 4.1 or newer. CodeReady Containers is designed to run on a local computer. It simplifies setup and testing by emulating the cloud development environment locally with all of the tools that you need to develop container-based applications.

Red Hat Marketplace is an open cloud marketplace that makes it easy to discover and purchase the certified, containerized tools you need to build enterprise-first applications. It was created to help developers using OpenShift build applications and deploy them across a hybrid cloud. Red Hat Marketplace works on any developer workstation that is running CodeReady Containers.

This article guides you through the steps of setting up Red Hat Marketplace and installing containerized products in your local CodeReady Containers-based OpenShift clusters.

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