Universal Base Images (UBI)

Introducing the Red Hat build of the OpenJDK Universal Base Images—now in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2

Introducing the Red Hat build of the OpenJDK Universal Base Images—now in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2

With the recent release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2, we also added the first Red Hat build of OpenJDK Universal Base Images. These General Availability (GA) images for OpenJDK 8 and OpenJDK 11 set a new baseline for anyone who wants to develop Java applications that run inside containers in a secure, stable, and tested manner.

In this article, we introduce the new OpenJDK Universal Base Images and explain their benefits for Java developers. Before we do that, let’s quickly review what we know about UBIs in general.

About Universal Base Images

Red Hat Universal Base Images (UBIs) are:

OCI-compliant container base operating system images with complementary runtime languages and packages that are freely redistributable. Like previous base images, they are built from portions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). UBI images can be obtained from the Red Hat container catalog and be built and deployed anywhere.

In other words, UBIs help application developers reach the secure, stable, and portable world of containers. These images are accessible using well-known tools like Podman/Buildah and Docker. Red Hat Universal Base Images also allow users to build and distribute their own applications on top of enterprise-quality bits that are supportable on Red Hat OpenShift and Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

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How to install CodeReady Workspaces in a restricted OpenShift 4 environment

How to install CodeReady Workspaces in a restricted OpenShift 4 environment

It’s your first day as a Java programmer, right out of college. You have received your badge, a shiny new laptop, and all of your software requests have been approved. Everything seems to be going well.

You install Eclipse and set up the required Java Development Kit (JDK) in your new development environment. You clone a project from the company’s GitHub repository, modify the code, and make your first commit. You are excited to be working on your first project.

But then, a few hours later, a senior programmer asks what version of the JDK you used. It seems that the pipeline is reporting a project failure. All you did was commit Java source code, not binary, and it worked perfectly on your local machine. What could possibly have gone wrong?

Coding in a restricted environment

The issue I described is well-known among programmers as the “It works on my computer, and I don’t know why it doesn’t work on your computer” problem. Fortunately, this is the type of problem Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces (CRW) can help you solve. CodeReady Workspaces is a cloud-based IDE based on Che. Whereas Che is an open source project, CRW is an enterprise-ready development environment that provides the security, stability, and consistency that many corporations require. All you have to do is open the CRW link in a web browser, sign in with your user credentials, and code inside the browser.

In this article, I show you how to install CodeReady Workspaces in a restricted Red Hat OpenShift 4 environment.

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Use Node.js 14 on Red Hat OpenShift

Use Node.js 14 on Red Hat OpenShift

On April 21st, Node.js released its latest major version with Node.js 14. Because this is an even-numbered release, it will become a Long Term Support (LTS) release in October 2020. This release brings a host of improvements and features, such as improved diagnostics, a V8 upgrade, an experimental Async Local Storage API, hardened the streams APIs, and more.

While Red Hat will release a Universal Base Image (UBI) for Node.js 14 in the coming months for Red Hat OpenShift and Red Hat Enterprise Linux, this article helps you get started today. If you’re interested in more about Node.js 14’s improvements and new features, check out the article listed at the end.

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Red Hat Universal Base Images for Docker users

Red Hat Universal Base Images for Docker users

Red Hat Universal Base Images (UBIs) allow developers using Docker on Windows and Mac platforms to tap into the benefits of the large Red Hat ecosystem. This article demonstrates how to use Red Hat Universal Base Images with Docker from a non-Red Hat system, such as a Windows or Mac workstation.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Docker

When Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8 was released almost a year ago, and it came with lots of new features related to containers. The biggest ones were the new container tools (Podman, Buildah, and skopeo) and the new Red Hat Universal Base Images. There was also confusion because RHEL 8 dropped support for the Docker toolset. Some developers thought that they could not work with Docker anymore, and had to either migrate to a Red Hat-ecosystem Linux system such as CentOS or stay away from Red Hat customers.

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Building freely distributed containers with Podman and Red Hat UBI

Building freely distributed containers with Podman and Red Hat UBI

DevNation tech talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions and code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about building containers with Podman and Red Hat Universal Base Image (UBI) from Scott McCarty and Burr Sutter.

We will cover how to build and run containers based on UBI using just your regular user account—no daemon, no root, no fuss. Finally, we will order the de-resolution of all of our containers with a really cool command. After this talk, you will have new tools at the ready to help you find, run, build, and share container images.

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Verifying signatures of Red Hat container images

Verifying signatures of Red Hat container images

Security-conscious organizations are accustomed to using digital signatures to validate application content from the Internet. A common example is RPM package signing. Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) validates signatures of RPM packages by default.

In the container world, a similar paradigm should be adhered to. In fact, all container images from Red Hat have been digitally signed and have been for several years. Many users are not aware of this because early container tooling was not designed to support digital signatures.

In this article, I’ll demonstrate how to configure a container engine to validate signatures of container images from the Red Hat registries for increased security of your containerized applications.

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How to reduce Red Hat Fuse image size

How to reduce Red Hat Fuse image size

Red Hat Fuse is a leading integration platform, which is capable of solving any given problem with simple enterprise integration patterns (EIP).  Over time, Red Hat Fuse has evolved to cater to a wide range of infrastructure needs.

For more information on each of these, check out the Red Hat Fuse documentation. The Fuse on Red Hat OpenShift flavor uses a Fuse image that has runtime components packaged inside a Linux container image.  This article will discuss how to reduce the size of the Fuse image. The same principle can be used for other images.

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What is Red Hat Universal Base Image?

What is Red Hat Universal Base Image?

Back in May, we launched the Red Hat Universal Base Image (UBI), targeted at developers building containerized applications for the cloud. Since then, we have published an extensive FAQ covering topics ranging from how often UBI is updated, to how the end user license agreement (EULA) allows you to redistribute applications built on it. These are all great fundamental topics to cover, but people still seem to have a lot of questions around what UBI is and what it isn’t.

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