Universal Base Images (UBI)

Red Hat Universal Base Image: How it works in 3 minutes or less

Red Hat Universal Base Image: How it works in 3 minutes or less

When we announced Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 in May, we also announced that all RHEL 8 base operating systems images, and many new RHEL 7 ones, would be available under the new Universal Base Image End User License Agreement (EULA). If UBI is new for you, this article summarizes UBI, explains why you’d want to use it, and supplies a set of resources to get you started with UBI.  And, if you have questions, we just published a brand new UBI FAQ.

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Container-related content you might have missed at Red Hat Summit

Container-related content you might have missed at Red Hat Summit

If you weren’t lucky enough to attend the recent Red Hat Summit or you went but couldn’t make it to all the container-related sessions, worry not. We teamed up with Scott McCarty, Principal Technology Product Manager–Containers at Red Hat, to bring you an overview of what you missed.

Choosing the right container base image for your applications

The Red Hat Universal Base Image (UBI) gives you three options for building containers with the full power of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) underneath. The goal is to create the smallest possible image that fully supports your application. You select a base image depending on the application you’re packaging in a container. For example, if you have a Golang or .NET application, all of that application’s dependencies are built in. That means you can use the minimal image (ubi-minimal), which contains microdnf, a package manager that only supports install, update, and remove functions. It also includes, well, a minimal set of tools.

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Working with Red Hat Enterprise Linux Universal Base Images (UBI)

Working with Red Hat Enterprise Linux Universal Base Images (UBI)

If you’re like me—a developer who works with customers who rely on the tried-and-true Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), works with containerized applications, and also prefers to work with Fedora Linux as their desktop operating system—you’re excited by the announcement of the Universal Base Images (UBI). This article shows how UBI actually works, by building the container image for a simple PHP application.

With UBI, you can build and redistribute container images based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux without requiring a Red Hat subscription. Users of UBI-based container images do not need Red Hat subscriptions. No more extra work creating CentOS-based container images for your community projects or for your customers that prefer self-support.

I tested all these steps on my personal Fedora 29 system, and they should work on any Linux distribution. I am also a big fan of the new container tools such as Podman, which should be available to your favorite Linux distribution. If you are working on a Windows or MacOS system, you can replace the Podman commands with Docker.

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