Python

Kubernetes integration and more in odo 2.0

Kubernetes integration and more in odo 2.0

Odo is a developer-focused command-line interface (CLI) for OpenShift and Kubernetes. This article introduces highlights of the odo 2.0 release, which now integrates with Kubernetes. Additional highlights include the new default deployment method in odo 2.0, which uses devfiles for rapid, iterative development. We’ve also moved Operator deployment out of experimental mode, so you can easily deploy Operator-backed services from the odo command line.

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Vulnerability analysis with Red Hat CodeReady Dependency Analytics and Snyk Intel

Vulnerability analysis with Red Hat CodeReady Dependency Analytics and Snyk Intel

Red Hat CodeReady Dependency Analytics is a hosted service on OpenShift that provides vulnerability and compliance analysis for your applications, directly from your IDE. It automatically analyzes your software composition and provides recommendations to address security holes and licensing issues. The 0.1 release of CodeReady Dependency Analytics includes access to the Snyk Intel Vulnerability Database, which is a curated database of both unique and known open source software security advisories.

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OpenShift 4.5: Bringing developers joy with Kubernetes 1.18 and so much more

OpenShift 4.5: Bringing developers joy with Kubernetes 1.18 and so much more

Since the first Red Hat OpenShift release in 2015, Red Hat has put out numerous releases based on Kubernetes. Five years later, Kubernetes is celebrating its sixth birthday, and last month, we announced the general availability of Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 4.5. In this article, I offer a high-level view of the latest OpenShift release and its technology and feature updates based on Kubernetes 1.18.

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Red Hat Software Collections 3.5 brings updates for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

Red Hat Software Collections 3.5 brings updates for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

Red Hat Software Collections 3.5 and Red Hat Developer Toolset 9.1 are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Here’s what that means for developers.

Red Hat Software Collections (RHSCL) is how we distribute the latest stable versions of various runtimes and languages through Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7, with some components available in RHEL 6. RHSCL also contains the Red Hat Developer Toolset, which is the set of tools we curate for C/C++ and Fortran. These components are supported for up to five years, which helps you build apps that have a long lifecycle as well.

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Alertmanager Watchdog monitoring with Nagios passive checks

Alertmanager Watchdog monitoring with Nagios passive checks

After installing a fresh Red Hat OpenShift cluster, go to Monitoring -> Alerting. There, you will find a Watchdog alert, which sends messages to let you know that Alertmanager is not only still running, but is also emitting other signals for alerts you might be interested in. You can hook into Watchdog alerts with an external monitoring system, which in turn can tell you that alerting in your OpenShift cluster is working.

“You need a check to check if your check checks out.”

How do you do this? Before we can configure Alertmanager for sending out Watchdog alerts, we need something on the receiving side, which is in our case Nagios. Follow me on this journey to get Alertmanager’s Watchdog alerting against Nagios with a passive check.

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How to write an ABI compliance checker using Libabigail

How to write an ABI compliance checker using Libabigail

I’ve previously written about the challenges of ensuring forward compatibility for application binary interfaces (ABIs) exposed by native shared libraries. This article introduces the other side of the equation: How to verify ABI backward compatibility for upstream projects.

If you’ve read my previous article, you’ve already been introduced to Libabigail, a static-code analysis and instrumentation library for constructing, manipulating, serializing, and de-serializing ABI-relevant artifacts.

In this article, I’ll show you how to build a Python-based checker that uses Libabigail to verify the backward compatibility of ABIs in a shared library. For this case, we’ll focus on ABIs for shared libraries in the executable and linkable format (ELF) binary format that runs on Linux-based operating systems.

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Python 2 support is going away soon: Make the move to Python 3

Python 2 support is going away soon: Make the move to Python 3

Seeing this tweet from Guido van Rossum the other day prompted me to write this “OMG, Python 2 is going away SOON” article. You have definitely heard it before, but seriously, folks, the Python upstream community is ending support for Python 2 at the end of the year!

Let’s stop saying “2020” because that sounds far away when, in fact, we are talking about January 1, 2020, which is two and half months from now. In this article, I’ll provide some quick links and basic information to help you make the move to Python 3.

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What’s new in Red Hat Dependency Analytics

What’s new in Red Hat Dependency Analytics

We are excited to announce a new release of Red Hat Dependency Analytics, a solution that enables developers to create better applications by evaluating and adding high-quality open source components, directly from their IDE.

Red Hat Dependency Analytics helps your development team avoid security and licensing issues when building your applications. It plugs into the developer’s IDE, automatically analyzes your software composition, and provides recommendations to address security holes and licensing problems that your team may be missing.

Without further ado, let’s jump into the new capabilities offered in this release. This release includes a new version of the IDE plugin and the server-side analysis service hosted by Red Hat.

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Python wheels, AI/ML, and ABI compatibility

Python wheels, AI/ML, and ABI compatibility

Python has become a popular programming language in the AI/ML world. Projects like TensorFlow and PyTorch have Python bindings as the primary interface used by data scientists to write machine learning code. However, distributing AI/ML-related Python packages and ensuring application binary interface (ABI) compatibility between various Python packages and system libraries presents a unique set of challenges.

The manylinux standard (e.g., manylinux2014) for Python wheels provides a practical solution to these challenges, but it also introduces new challenges that the Python community and developers need to consider. Before we delve into these additional challenges, we’ll briefly look at the Python ecosystem for packaging and distribution.

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