Performance

Register Transfer Language for CRuby

Register Transfer Language for CRuby

For the last two years, I have been trying to improve CRuby performance. I have been working simultaneously on two major fronts: introducing register transfer language (RTL) for the CRuby virtual machine (VM) and just-in-time (JIT) compilation. For background on the goal of having Ruby 3 be 3 times faster than version 2 (3X3), see my previous article, “Towards the Ruby 3×3 Performance Goal“.

The JIT project (MJIT) is advancing successfully. The JIT approach and engine I proposed and implemented has been adopted by the CRuby community. Takashi Kokubun hardened the code and adapted it to the current CRuby stack machine and recently MJIT became an experimental feature of the CRuby 2.6 release.

Introducing a Register Transfer Language (RTL) to the CRuby VM turned out to be an even harder task than introducing the initial JIT compiler. The required changes to the VM are far more invasive than the ones needed for the JIT compiler.

This article describes the advantages and disadvantages of RTL for CRuby.

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Algorithms != Programs and Programs are not “One size fits all”

Algorithms != Programs and Programs are not “One size fits all”

You’ve probably been taught that picking an algorithm that has the best Big-O asymptotic cost will yield the best performance. You might be surprised to find that on current hardware, this isn’t always the case. Much of algorithmic analysis assumes very simple costs where the order of operations doesn’t matter. Memory access times are assumed to be the same. However, the difference between a cache hit (a few processor clock cycles) and a cache miss that requires access to main memory (a couple hundred cycles) is immense.
This article series is the result of the authors (William Cohen and Ben Woodard) discussion that there is a disconnect on the typical ideas of algorithm efficiency taught in computer science and computer engineering versus what is currently encountered in actual computer systems.

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Automating tests and metrics gathering for Kubernetes and OpenShift  (part 3)

Automating tests and metrics gathering for Kubernetes and OpenShift (part 3)

This is the third of a series of three articles based on a session I held at Red Hat Tech Exchange EMEA. In the first article, I presented the rationale and approach for leveraging Red Hat OpenShift or Kubernetes for automated performance testing, and I gave an overview of the setup. In the second article, we looked at building an observability stack. In this third part, we will see how the execution of the performance tests can be automated and related metrics gathered.

An example of what is described in this article is available in my GitHub repository.

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Speeding up Open vSwitch with partial hardware offloading

Speeding up Open vSwitch with partial hardware offloading

Open vSwitch (OVS) can use the kernel datapath or the userspace datapath. There are interesting developments in the kernel datapath using hardware offloading through the TC Flower packet classifier, but in this article, the focus will be on the userspace datapath accelerated with the Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) and its new feature—partial flow hardware offloading—to accelerate the virtual switch even more.

This article explains how the virtual switch worked before versus now and why the new feature can potentially save resources while improving the packet processing rate.

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Building an observability stack for automated performance tests on Kubernetes and OpenShift (part 2)

Building an observability stack for automated performance tests on Kubernetes and OpenShift (part 2)

This is the second of a series of three articles based on a session I held at Red Hat Tech Exchange in EMEA. In the first article, I presented the rationale and approach for leveraging Red Hat OpenShift or Kubernetes for automated performance testing, and I gave an overview of the setup.

In this article, we will look at building an observability stack. In production, the observability stack can help verify that the system is working correctly and performing well. It can also be leveraged during performance tests to provide insight into how the application performs under load.

An example of what is described in this article is available in my GitHub repository.

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Using a Kotlin-based gRPC API with Envoy proxy for server-side load balancing

Using a Kotlin-based gRPC API with Envoy proxy for server-side load balancing

These days, microservices-based architectures are being implemented almost everywhere. One business function could be using a few microservices that generate lots of network traffic in the form of messages being passed around. If we can make the way we pass messages more efficient by having a smaller message size, we could  the same infrastructure to handle higher loads.

Protobuf (short for “protocol buffers”) provides language- and platform-neutral mechanisms for serializing structured data for use in communications protocols, data storage, and more. gRPC is a modern, open source remote procedure call (RPC) framework that can run anywhere. Together, they provide an efficient message format that is automatically compressed and provides first-class support for complex data structures among other benefits (unlike JSON).

Microservices environments require lots of communication between services, and for this to happen, services need to agree on a few things. They need to agree on an API for exchanging data, for example, POST (or PUT) and GET to send and receive messages. And they need to agree on the format of the data (JSON). Clients calling the service also need to write lots of boilerplate code to make the remote calls (frameworks!). Protobuf and gRPC provide a way to define the schema of the message (JSON cannot) and generate skeleton code to consume a gRPC service (no frameworks required).

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Using eXpress Data Path (XDP) maps in RHEL 8 Beta: Part 2

Using eXpress Data Path (XDP) maps in RHEL 8 Beta: Part 2

Diving into XDP

In the first part of this series on XDP, I introduced XDP and discussed the simplest possible example. Let’s now try to do something less trivial, exploring some more-advanced eBPF features—maps—and some common pitfalls.

XDP is available in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta, which you can download and run now.

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Achieving high-performance, low-latency networking with XDP: Part I

Achieving high-performance, low-latency networking with XDP: Part I

XDP: From zero to 14 Mpps

In past years, the kernel community has been using different approaches in the quest for ever-increasing networking performance. While improvements have been measurable in several areas, a new wave of architecture-related security issues and related counter-measures has undone most of the gains, and purely in-kernel solutions for some packet-processing intensive workloads still lag behind the bypass solution, namely Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK), by almost an order of magnitude.

But the kernel community never sleeps (almost literally) and the holy grail of kernel-based networking performance has been found under the name of XDP: the eXpress Data Path. XDP is available in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta, which you can download and run now.

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Reducing the startup overhead of SystemTap monitoring scripts with syscall_any tapset

Reducing the startup overhead of SystemTap monitoring scripts with syscall_any tapset

A number of the SystemTap script examples in the newly released SystemTap 4.0 available in Fedora 28 and 29 have reduced the amount of time required to convert the scripts into running instrumentation by using the syscall_any tapset.

This article discusses the particular changes made in the scripts and how you might also use this new tapset to make the instrumentation that monitors system calls smaller and more efficient. (This article is a follow-on to my previous article: Analyzing and reducing SystemTap’s startup cost for scripts.)

The key observation that triggered the creation of the syscall_any tapset was a number of scripts that did not use the syscall arguments. The scripts often used syscall.* and syscall.*.return, but they were only concerned with the particular syscall name and the return value. This type of information for all the system calls is available from the sys_entry and sys_exit kernel tracepoints. Thus, rather than creating hundreds of kprobes for each of the individual functions implementing the various system calls, there are just a couple of tracepoints being used in their place.

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Analyzing and reducing SystemTap’s startup cost for scripts

Analyzing and reducing SystemTap’s startup cost for scripts

SystemTap is a powerful tool for investigating system issues, but for some SystemTap instrumentation scripts, the startup times are too long. This article is Part 1 of a series and describes how to analyze and reduce SystemTap’s startup costs for scripts.

We can use SystemTap to investigate this problem and provide some hard data on the time required for each of the passes that SystemTap uses to convert a SystemTap script into instrumentation. SystemTap has a set of probe points marking the start and end of passes from 0 to 5:

  • pass0: Parsing command-line arguments
  • pass1: Parsing scripts
  • pass2: Elaboration
  • pass3: Translation to C
  • pass4: Compilation of C code into kernel module
  • pass5: Running the instrumentation

Articles in this series:

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