Modern App Dev

Architecting messaging solutions with Apache ActiveMQ Artemis

Architecting messaging solutions with Apache ActiveMQ Artemis

As an architect in the Red Hat Consulting team, I’ve helped countless customers with their integration challenges over the last six years. Recently, I had a few consulting gigs around Red Hat AMQ 7 Broker (the enterprise version of Apache ActiveMQ Artemis), where the requirements and outcomes were similar. That similarity made me think that the whole requirement identification process and can be more structured and repeatable.

This guide is intended for sharing what I learned from these few gigs in an attempt to make the AMQ Broker architecting process, the resulting deployment topologies, and the expected effort more predictable—at least for the common use cases. As such, what follows will be useful for messaging and integration consultants and architects tasked with creating a messaging architecture for Apache Artemis, and other messaging solutions in general. This article focuses on Apache Artemis. It doesn’t cover Apache Kafka, Strimzi, Apache Qpid, EnMasse, or the EAP messaging system, which are all components of our Red Hat AMQ 7 product offering.

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Red Hat support for Node.js

Red Hat support for Node.js

Node.js Foundation Logo

For the past two years, Red Hat Middleware has provided a supported Node.js runtime on Red Hat OpenShift as part of Red Hat Runtimes. Our goal has been to provide rapid releases of the upstream Node.js core project, example applications to get developers up and running quickly, Node.js container images, integrations with other components of Red Hat’s cloud-native stack, and (of course) provide world-class service and support for customers. Earlier this year, the team behind Red Hat’s distribution and support of Node.js even received a “Devie” award from DeveloperWeek for this work, further acknowledging Red Hat’s role in supporting the community and ecosystem.

Red Hat Node.js experts at your fingertips

Red Hat collaborates in more ways than one with the fastest growing runtimes used in business-critical applications on the cloud by contributing to the community, being part of the Technical Steering Committee, and even participating and driving strategic initiatives to carve the future of Node.js. Combining this work with our Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and OpenShift expertise, we can help you reach your goals of delivering and supporting business-critical applications on and off the cloud.

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New Eclipse MicroProfile book provides introduction to enterprise Java microservices

New Eclipse MicroProfile book provides introduction to enterprise Java microservices

Fellow Red Hat associates Cesar Saavedra, Pavol Loffay, Jeff Mesnil, Antoine Sabot-Durand, Scott Stark, and I have written a book on Eclipse MicroProfile, called Hands-On Enterprise Java Microservices with Eclipse MicroProfile

This 256-page book provides an introduction to microservices and why they are important, and it showcases Eclipse MicroProfile as a way to implement so-called 12-factor apps.

Now through December 15, you can use the following link and discount code to receive a 20% discount when purchasing this ebook through the Packt website.

Hands-On Enterprise Java Microservices with Eclipse MicroProfile

Discount code: eclipse20

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Eclipse Che 7 and the .NET developer

Eclipse Che 7 and the .NET developer

Eclipse Che 7, an open source in-the-browser development environment, allows you to define custom workspaces for your software development. Think of a workspace as you would think of a development PC: You have an operating system, programming language support, and all the tools necessary to write code. In this article, I’ll introduce the .NET developer to this new world and highlight ways you can use Eclipse Che to your advantage.

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Autowire MicroProfile into Spring with Quarkus

Autowire MicroProfile into Spring with Quarkus

Eclipse MicroProfile and Spring Boot are often thought of as separate and distinct APIs when developing Java microservices. Developers default to their mental muscle memory by leveraging the APIs that they use on a daily basis. Learning new frameworks and runtimes can be a significant time investment. This article aims to ease the introduction to some popular MicroProfile APIs for Spring developers by enabling them to utilize the Spring APIs they already know while benefiting from significant new capabilities offered by Quarkus.

More specifically, this article covers the scope and details of the Spring APIs supported by Quarkus so Spring developers have a grasp of the foundation they can build on with MicroProfile APIs. The article then covers MicroProfile APIs that Spring developers will find helpful in the development of microservices. Only a subset of MicroProfile is covered.

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Extending support for Spring Boot 2.1.6 and Spring Reactive

Extending support for Spring Boot 2.1.6 and Spring Reactive

Red Hat Application Runtimes recently added extended support for the Spring Boot 2.1.6 runtime for Red Hat customers building Spring apps. Red Hat Application Runtimes provides application developers with a variety of application runtimes running on the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform.

Introduction to Spring Boot

Spring Boot lets you create opinionated Spring-based standalone applications. The Spring Boot runtime also integrates with the OpenShift platform, allowing your services to externalize their configuration, implement health checks, provide resiliency and failover, and much more.

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Getting started with Tekton on Red Hat OpenShift

Getting started with Tekton on Red Hat OpenShift

I recently heard about Tekton as an alternative for Jenkins on Red Hat OpenShift. What got my attention was that Tekton uses Operators as building blocks, and Operators are something I am also interested in. I don’t want to get ahead of myself, though; so we’ll start with installing Tekton on Red Hat OpenShift. Installing on Kubernetes is also possible, but for now the focus is on OpenShift.

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Project Loom: Lightweight Java threads

Project Loom: Lightweight Java threads

Building responsiveness applications is a never-ending task. With the rise of powerful and multicore CPUs, more raw power is available for applications to consume. In Java, threads are used to make the application work on multiple tasks concurrently. A developer starts a Java thread in the program, and tasks are assigned to this thread to get processed. Threads can do a variety of tasks, such as read from a file, write to a database, take input from a user, and so on.

In this article, we’ll explain more about threads and introduce Project Loom, which supports high-throughput and lightweight concurrency in Java to help simplify writing scalable software.

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