Programming Languages

Architecting messaging solutions with Apache ActiveMQ Artemis

Architecting messaging solutions with Apache ActiveMQ Artemis

As an architect in the Red Hat Consulting team, I’ve helped countless customers with their integration challenges over the last six years. Recently, I had a few consulting gigs around Red Hat AMQ 7 Broker (the enterprise version of Apache ActiveMQ Artemis), where the requirements and outcomes were similar. That similarity made me think that the whole requirement identification process and can be more structured and repeatable.

This guide is intended for sharing what I learned from these few gigs in an attempt to make the AMQ Broker architecting process, the resulting deployment topologies, and the expected effort more predictable—at least for the common use cases. As such, what follows will be useful for messaging and integration consultants and architects tasked with creating a messaging architecture for Apache Artemis, and other messaging solutions in general. This article focuses on Apache Artemis. It doesn’t cover Apache Kafka, Strimzi, Apache Qpid, EnMasse, or the EAP messaging system, which are all components of our Red Hat AMQ 7 product offering.

Continue reading “Architecting messaging solutions with Apache ActiveMQ Artemis”

Share
Red Hat support for Node.js

Red Hat support for Node.js

Node.js Foundation Logo

For the past two years, Red Hat Middleware has provided a supported Node.js runtime on Red Hat OpenShift as part of Red Hat Runtimes. Our goal has been to provide rapid releases of the upstream Node.js core project, example applications to get developers up and running quickly, Node.js container images, integrations with other components of Red Hat’s cloud-native stack, and (of course) provide world-class service and support for customers. Earlier this year, the team behind Red Hat’s distribution and support of Node.js even received a “Devie” award from DeveloperWeek for this work, further acknowledging Red Hat’s role in supporting the community and ecosystem.

Red Hat Node.js experts at your fingertips

Red Hat collaborates in more ways than one with the fastest growing runtimes used in business-critical applications on the cloud by contributing to the community, being part of the Technical Steering Committee, and even participating and driving strategic initiatives to carve the future of Node.js. Combining this work with our Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and OpenShift expertise, we can help you reach your goals of delivering and supporting business-critical applications on and off the cloud.

Continue reading “Red Hat support for Node.js”

Share
Introducing the Service Binding Operator

Introducing the Service Binding Operator

Connecting applications to the services that support them—for example, establishing the exchange of credentials between a Java application and a database that it requires—is referred to as binding. The configuration and maintenance of this binding together of applications and backing services can be a tedious and inefficient process. Manually editing YAML files to define binding information is error-prone and can introduce difficult-to-debug failures.

Continue reading Introducing the Service Binding Operator

Share
Deploying debuginfod servers for your developers

Deploying debuginfod servers for your developers

In an earlier article, Aaron Merey introduced the new elfutils debuginfo-server daemon. With this software now integrated and released into elfutils 0.178 and coming to distros near you, it’s time to consider why and how to set up such a service for yourself and your team.

Recall that debuginfod exists to distribute ELF or DWARF debugging information, plus associated source code, for a collection of binaries. If you need to run a debugger like gdb, a trace or probe tool like perf or systemtap, binary analysis tools like binutils or pahole, or binary rewriting libraries like dyninst, you will eventually need debuginfo that matches your binaries. The debuginfod client support in these tools enables a fast, transparent way of fetching this data on the fly, without ever having to stop, change to root, run all of the right yum debuginfo-install commands, and try again. Debuginfo lets you debug anywhere, anytime.

We hope this opening addresses the “why.” Now, onto the “how.”

Continue reading “Deploying debuginfod servers for your developers”

Share
Jakarta EE: Creating an Enterprise JavaBeans timer

Jakarta EE: Creating an Enterprise JavaBeans timer

Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) has many interesting and useful features, some of which I will be highlighting in this and upcoming articles. In this article, I’ll show you how to create an EJB timer programmatically and with annotation. Let’s go!

The EJB timer feature allows us to schedule tasks to be executed according a calendar configuration. It is very useful because we can execute scheduled tasks using the power of Jakarta context. When we run tasks based on a timer, we need to answer some questions about concurrency, which node the task was scheduled on (in case of an application in a cluster), what is the action if the task does not execute, and others. When we use the EJB timer we can delegate many of these concerns to Jakarta context and care more about business logic. It is interesting, isn’t it?

Continue reading “Jakarta EE: Creating an Enterprise JavaBeans timer”

Share
MicroProfile 3.2 is now available on Open Liberty in Red Hat Runtimes

MicroProfile 3.2 is now available on Open Liberty in Red Hat Runtimes

Open Liberty 19.0.0.12 provides support for MicroProfile 3.2, allowing users to provide their own health check procedures and monitor microservice applications easily with metrics. Additionally, updates allow trust to be established using the JDK’s default truststore or a certificate through an environment variable.

Continue reading MicroProfile 3.2 is now available on Open Liberty in Red Hat Runtimes

Share
New Eclipse MicroProfile book provides introduction to enterprise Java microservices

New Eclipse MicroProfile book provides introduction to enterprise Java microservices

Fellow Red Hat associates Cesar Saavedra, Pavol Loffay, Jeff Mesnil, Antoine Sabot-Durand, Scott Stark, and I have written a book on Eclipse MicroProfile, called Hands-On Enterprise Java Microservices with Eclipse MicroProfile

This 256-page book provides an introduction to microservices and why they are important, and it showcases Eclipse MicroProfile as a way to implement so-called 12-factor apps.

Now through December 15, you can use the following link and discount code to receive a 20% discount when purchasing this ebook through the Packt website.

Hands-On Enterprise Java Microservices with Eclipse MicroProfile

Discount code: eclipse20

Continue reading “New Eclipse MicroProfile book provides introduction to enterprise Java microservices”

Share