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Red Hat Software Collections 3.5 brings updates for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

Red Hat Software Collections 3.5 brings updates for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

Red Hat Software Collections 3.5 and Red Hat Developer Toolset 9.1 are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Here’s what that means for developers.

Red Hat Software Collections (RHSCL) is how we distribute the latest stable versions of various runtimes and languages through Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7, with some components available in RHEL 6. RHSCL also contains the Red Hat Developer Toolset, which is the set of tools we curate for C/C++ and Fortran. These components are supported for up to five years, which helps you build apps that have a long lifecycle as well.

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Build a Go application using OpenShift Pipelines

Build a Go application using OpenShift Pipelines

Go is an increasingly popular programming language, and frequently chosen for developing command-line utilities. Many tools used with Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift are written in Go, including the command-line interfaces (CLIs) for Tekton (tkn), OpenShift (oc), and Kubernetes (kubectl). Also, developers can compile Go to a single executable for a broad range of operating systems. As a result, it’s easy to develop and desk-test applications before putting them into containers and running those containers in OpenShift.

In a meta sort of way, this is an article about a tutorial, where I show you how to build and deliver a small Go RESTful service using OpenShift Pipelines. You could just jump to the tutorial now, but I suggest reading this article first. I’ll quickly introduce the working environment for the tutorial, and I’ll explain my logic for setting up the tutorial the way that I did.

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Operator SDK: Build Kubernetes Operators and deploy them on OpenShift

Operator SDK: Build Kubernetes Operators and deploy them on OpenShift

The Operator SDK makes it simple to build Kubernetes-native applications, providing the tools to build, test, and package Operators. The SDK also helps the developer to build Operators without requiring knowledge of Kubernetes API complexities.

In this article, we will create a sample Operator for deploying a sample application based on Spring Boot and Camel. This application is a simple Camel route that uses the undertow component. After building the Operator, we will deploy it on an OpenShift cluster.

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Support lifecycle for Clang/LLVM, Go, and Rust in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8

Support lifecycle for Clang/LLVM, Go, and Rust in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8

Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.1.0 includes updates to our llvm-toolset, go-toolset, and rust-toolset application streams, which provide developers with up-to-date versions of these compiler toolchains. The upstream projects for these streams move very quickly with new feature releases every six months for LLVM and Go, and every six weeks (!) for Rust. The communities around these toolchains encourage users to users to always stay up-to-date with the latest releases, which is why we try to get new versions into Red Hat Enterprise Linux as quickly as we can.

From a support perspective, we will continue to support these application streams for the entire life of RHEL 8. We will provide new features and bug fixes within the stream by updating to newer upstream releases on a regular basis. For llvm-toolset and go-toolset, you can expect stream updates every six months, and for rust-toolset you can expect updates every three months.

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Getting started with Golang Operators by using Operator SDK

Getting started with Golang Operators by using Operator SDK

The open source Operator Framework is a toolkit to manage Kubernetes-native applications. The framework and its features provide the ability to develop solutions to simplify some complexities, such as the process to install, configure, manage and package applications on Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift. It provides the ability to use a client to perform CRUD actions, that is, operations to create, read, update, and delete data on these platforms.

By using operators, it’s possible not only to provide all expected resources but also to manage them dynamically, programmatically, and at execution time. To illustrate this idea, imagine if someone accidentally changed a configuration or removed a resource by mistake; in this case, the operator could fix it without any human intervention. We’ll take a look at Operators and the Operator SDK in this article.

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Probing golang runtime using SystemTap

Probing golang runtime using SystemTap

I recently saw an article from Uber Engineering describing an issue they were having with an increase in latency. The Uber engineers suspected that their code was running out of stack space causing the golang runtime to issue a stack growth, which would introduce additional latency due to memory allocation and copying. The engineers ended up modifying the golang runtime with additional instrumentation to report these stack growths to confirm their suspicions. This situation is a perfect example of where SystemTap could have been used.

SystemTap is a tool that can be used to perform live analysis of a running program. It is able to interrupt normal control flow and execute code specified by a SystemTap script, which can allow users to temporarily modify a running program without having to change the source and recompile.

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Using a custom builder image on Red Hat OpenShift with OpenShift Do

Using a custom builder image on Red Hat OpenShift with OpenShift Do

One of the things I enjoy most about using Red Hat OpenShift is the Developer Catalog. The Developer Catalog is a central location where a team working with Red Hat OpenShift can encapsulate and share how application components and services are deployed.

The Developer Catalog is often used to define an infrastructure pattern referred to as a builder image. A builder image is a container image that supports a particular language or framework, following best practices and Source-to-Image (s2i) specifications.

The OpenShift Developer Catalog provides several standard builder images supporting applications written in Node.js, Ruby, Python, and more. And while the Developer Catalog has many easy ways to get started deploying several supported languages, the catalog is also flexible in allowing you to add your own builder images to support an infrastructure pattern that is not preloaded in the catalog.

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Go and FIPS 140-2 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Go and FIPS 140-2 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Red Hat provides the Go programming language to Red Hat Enterprise Linux customers via the go-toolset package. If this package is new to you, and you want to learn more, check out some of the previous articles that have been written for some background.

The go-toolset package is currently shipping Go version 1.11.x, with Red Hat planning to ship 1.12.x in Fall 2019. Currently, the go-toolset package only provides the Go toolchain (e.g., the compiler and associated tools like gofmt); however, we are looking into adding other tools to provide a more complete and full-featured Go development environment.

In this article, I will talk about some of the improvements, changes, and exciting new features for go-toolset that we have been working on. These changes bring many upstream improvements and CVE fixes, as well as new features that we have been developing internally alongside upstream.

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux compiler toolset updates: Clang/LLVM 7.0, Go 1.11, Rust 1.31

Red Hat Enterprise Linux compiler toolset updates: Clang/LLVM 7.0, Go 1.11, Rust 1.31

We are pleased to announce the general availability of these three compiler toolsets for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7:

  • Clang/LLVM 7.0
  • Go 1.11
  • Rust 1.31

These toolsets can be installed from the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Devtools channel. See the “Compiler toolset details” section of this article to learn about the new features.

These toolsets became officially supported Red Hat offerings as of the previous release.

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Support Lifecycle for Clang/LLVM, Go, and Rust

Support Lifecycle for Clang/LLVM, Go, and Rust

On the heels of our recently announcement, General Availability of Clang/LLVM 6.0, Go 1.10, and Rust 1.29, I want to share how we’ll be supporting them going forward. Previously, these packages had been in “Technology Preview” status, which means that they were provided for “you to test functionality and provide feedback during the development process”, and were “not fully supported under Red Hat Subscription Level Agreements, may not be functionally complete, and are not intended for production use”.

So now that we’ve promoted them to fully supported status, what does that mean? In the simplest terms, General Availability (GA) means that these packages have officially entered the “Full Support Phase” of their lifecycle:

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