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Vulnerability analysis for Golang applications with Red Hat CodeReady Dependency Analytics

Vulnerability analysis for Golang applications with Red Hat CodeReady Dependency Analytics

Red Hat CodeReady Dependency Analytics, powered by Snyk Intel Vulnerability database, helps developers find, identify, and fix security vulnerabilities in their code. In the latest 0.3.2 release, we focused on supporting vulnerability analysis for Golang application dependencies, providing easier access to vulnerability details uniquely known to Snyk, and other user experience improvements.

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Deploying Kubernetes Operators with Operator Lifecycle Manager bundles

Deploying Kubernetes Operators with Operator Lifecycle Manager bundles

This article shows an example of using the Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) bundle deployment architecture to deploy a Red Hat OpenShift or other Kubernetes Operator. You will learn how to use OLM and the Operator SDK (both components of the Kubernetes Operator Framework) together to deploy an Operator.

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Create a Kubernetes Operator in Golang to automatically manage a simple, stateful application

Create a Kubernetes Operator in Golang to automatically manage a simple, stateful application

A Kubernetes Operator acts as an automated site reliability engineer for its application, encoding the skills of an expert administrator in software. For example, an Operator can manage a cluster of database servers and configure and manage its application. It can also install a database cluster of a declared software version and a designated number of members.

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5 tips for developing Kubernetes Operators with the new Operator SDK

5 tips for developing Kubernetes Operators with the new Operator SDK

Kubernetes Operators are all the rage this season, and the fame is well deserved. Operators are evolving from being used primarily by technical-infrastructure gurus to becoming more mainstream, Kubernetes-native tools for managing complex applications. Kubernetes Operators today are important for cluster administrators and ISV providers, and also for custom applications developed in house. They provide the base for a standardized operational model that is similar to what cloud providers offer. Operators also open the door to fully portable workloads and services on Kubernetes.

The new Kubernetes Operator Framework is an open source toolkit that lets you manage Kubernetes Operators in an effective, automated, and scalable way. The Operator Framework consists of three components: the Operator SDK, the Operator Lifecycle Manager, and OperatorHub. In this article, I introduce tips and tricks for working with the Operator SDK. The Operator SDK 1.0.0 release shipped in mid-August, so it’s a great time to have a look at it.

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How to run Red Hat CodeReady Containers on Windows 10 Enterprise

How to run Red Hat CodeReady Containers on Windows 10 Enterprise

Red Hat CodeReady Containers allows you to spin up a small Red Hat OpenShift cluster on your local PC, without the need for a server, a cloud, or a team of operations people. For developers who want to get started immediately with cloud-native development, containers, and Kubernetes (as well as OpenShift), it’s a simple and slick tool. It runs on macOS, Linux, and all versions of Windows 10.

Except for Windows 10 Enterprise.

Which I painfully learned.

Because I lazily didn’t pay attention to the documentation.

OK, so I’m the only developer who glosses over documentation. Fortunately for you, I struggled and managed to get CRC running on my Windows 10 Enterprise notebook computer, and this article explains what is involved to get it working. So, in a sense, you’re welcome that I’m lazy.

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Red Hat Software Collections 3.5 brings updates for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

Red Hat Software Collections 3.5 brings updates for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

Red Hat Software Collections 3.5 and Red Hat Developer Toolset 9.1 are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Here’s what that means for developers.

Red Hat Software Collections (RHSCL) is how we distribute the latest stable versions of various runtimes and languages through Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7, with some components available in RHEL 6. RHSCL also contains the Red Hat Developer Toolset, which is the set of tools we curate for C/C++ and Fortran. These components are supported for up to five years, which helps you build apps that have a long lifecycle as well.

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Build a Go application using OpenShift Pipelines

Build a Go application using OpenShift Pipelines

Go is an increasingly popular programming language, and frequently chosen for developing command-line utilities. Many tools used with Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift are written in Go, including the command-line interfaces (CLIs) for Tekton (tkn), OpenShift (oc), and Kubernetes (kubectl). Also, developers can compile Go to a single executable for a broad range of operating systems. As a result, it’s easy to develop and desk-test applications before putting them into containers and running those containers in OpenShift.

In a meta sort of way, this is an article about a tutorial, where I show you how to build and deliver a small Go RESTful service using OpenShift Pipelines. You could just jump to the tutorial now, but I suggest reading this article first. I’ll quickly introduce the working environment for the tutorial, and I’ll explain my logic for setting up the tutorial the way that I did.

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Operator SDK: Build Kubernetes Operators and deploy them on OpenShift

Operator SDK: Build Kubernetes Operators and deploy them on OpenShift

The Operator SDK makes it simple to build Kubernetes-native applications, providing the tools to build, test, and package Operators. The SDK also helps the developer to build Operators without requiring knowledge of Kubernetes API complexities.

In this article, we will create a sample Operator for deploying a sample application based on Spring Boot and Camel. This application is a simple Camel route that uses the undertow component. After building the Operator, we will deploy it on an OpenShift cluster.

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