Go

Probing golang runtime using SystemTap

Probing golang runtime using SystemTap

I recently saw an article from Uber Engineering describing an issue they were having with an increase in latency. The Uber engineers suspected that their code was running out of stack space causing the golang runtime to issue a stack growth, which would introduce additional latency due to memory allocation and copying. The engineers ended up modifying the golang runtime with additional instrumentation to report these stack growths to confirm their suspicions. This situation is a perfect example of where SystemTap could have been used.

SystemTap is a tool that can be used to perform live analysis of a running program. It is able to interrupt normal control flow and execute code specified by a SystemTap script, which can allow users to temporarily modify a running program without having to change the source and recompile.

Continue reading “Probing golang runtime using SystemTap”

Share
Using a custom builder image on Red Hat OpenShift with OpenShift Do

Using a custom builder image on Red Hat OpenShift with OpenShift Do

One of the things I enjoy most about using Red Hat OpenShift is the Developer Catalog. The Developer Catalog is a central location where a team working with Red Hat OpenShift can encapsulate and share how application components and services are deployed.

The Developer Catalog is often used to define an infrastructure pattern referred to as a builder image. A builder image is a container image that supports a particular language or framework, following best practices and Source-to-Image (s2i) specifications.

The OpenShift Developer Catalog provides several standard builder images supporting applications written in Node.js, Ruby, Python, and more. And while the Developer Catalog has many easy ways to get started deploying several supported languages, the catalog is also flexible in allowing you to add your own builder images to support an infrastructure pattern that is not preloaded in the catalog.

Continue reading “Using a custom builder image on Red Hat OpenShift with OpenShift Do”

Share
Go and FIPS 140-2 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Go and FIPS 140-2 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Red Hat provides the Go programming language to Red Hat Enterprise Linux customers via the go-toolset package. If this package is new to you, and you want to learn more, check out some of the previous articles that have been written for some background.

The go-toolset package is currently shipping Go version 1.11.x, with Red Hat planning to ship 1.12.x in Fall 2019. Currently, the go-toolset package only provides the Go toolchain (e.g., the compiler and associated tools like gofmt); however, we are looking into adding other tools to provide a more complete and full-featured Go development environment.

In this article, I will talk about some of the improvements, changes, and exciting new features for go-toolset that we have been working on. These changes bring many upstream improvements and CVE fixes, as well as new features that we have been developing internally alongside upstream.

Continue reading “Go and FIPS 140-2 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux”

Share
Red Hat Enterprise Linux compiler toolset updates: Clang/LLVM 7.0, Go 1.11, Rust 1.31

Red Hat Enterprise Linux compiler toolset updates: Clang/LLVM 7.0, Go 1.11, Rust 1.31

We are pleased to announce the general availability of these three compiler toolsets for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7:

  • Clang/LLVM 7.0
  • Go 1.11
  • Rust 1.31

These toolsets can be installed from the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Devtools channel. See the “Compiler toolset details” section of this article to learn about the new features.

These toolsets became officially supported Red Hat offerings as of the previous release.

Continue reading “Red Hat Enterprise Linux compiler toolset updates: Clang/LLVM 7.0, Go 1.11, Rust 1.31”

Share
Support Lifecycle for Clang/LLVM, Go, and Rust

Support Lifecycle for Clang/LLVM, Go, and Rust

On the heels of our recently announcement, General Availability of Clang/LLVM 6.0, Go 1.10, and Rust 1.29, I want to share how we’ll be supporting them going forward. Previously, these packages had been in “Technology Preview” status, which means that they were provided for “you to test functionality and provide feedback during the development process”, and were “not fully supported under Red Hat Subscription Level Agreements, may not be functionally complete, and are not intended for production use”.

So now that we’ve promoted them to fully supported status, what does that mean? In the simplest terms, General Availability (GA) means that these packages have officially entered the “Full Support Phase” of their lifecycle:

Continue reading “Support Lifecycle for Clang/LLVM, Go, and Rust”

Share
Clang/LLVM 6.0, Go 1.10, and Rust 1.29 NOW GA for RHEL

Clang/LLVM 6.0, Go 1.10, and Rust 1.29 NOW GA for RHEL

We are pleased to announce general availability of these 3 compiler toolsets for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. These versions are now officially supported Red Hat offerings:

  • Clang/LLVM 6.0
  • Go 1.10
  • Rust 1.29

These toolsets can be installed from the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Devtools channel.  See the “New compiler details” below to learn about the new features.

Continue reading “Clang/LLVM 6.0, Go 1.10, and Rust 1.29 NOW GA for RHEL”

Share
Clang/LLVM 6.0, Go 1.10, and Rust 1.29 now in beta for Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Clang/LLVM 6.0, Go 1.10, and Rust 1.29 now in beta for Red Hat Enterprise Linux

We are pleased to announce the immediate availability of these three compiler toolsets now in beta for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.  Upon the GA release, these versions will become officially supported Red Hat offerings:

  • Clang/LLVM 6.0
  • Go 1.10
  • Rust 1.29

These toolsets can be installed from the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Devtools channel.  See the “New compiler details” below to learn about the new features.

Continue reading “Clang/LLVM 6.0, Go 1.10, and Rust 1.29 now in beta for Red Hat Enterprise Linux”

Share
Announcing GA for latest Software Collections, Developer Toolset, Compilers

Announcing GA for latest Software Collections, Developer Toolset, Compilers

We are pleased to announce the general availability of:

  • Red Hat Software Collections 3.1 (including Ruby 2.5, Perl 2.26, PHP 7.0.27, PostgreSQL 10, MongoDB 3.6, Varnish 5, HAProxy 1.8, Apache 2.4 update)
  • Red Hat Developer Toolset 7.1 (GCC 7.3)
  • Clang/LLVM 5.0, Go 1.8.7, Rust 1.25.0

Continue reading “Announcing GA for latest Software Collections, Developer Toolset, Compilers”

Share
Recommended compiler and linker flags for GCC

Recommended compiler and linker flags for GCC

Did you know that when you compile your C or C++ programs, GCC will not enable all exceptions by default?  Do you know which build flags you need to specify in order to obtain the same level of security hardening that GNU/Linux distributions use (such as Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora)? This article walks through a list of recommended build flags.

The GNU-based toolchain in Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora (consisting of GCC programs such as gcc, g++, and Binutils programs such as as and ld)  are very close to upstream defaults in terms of build flags. For historical reasons, the GCC and Binutils upstream projects do not enable optimization or any security hardening by default. While some aspects of the default settings can be changed when building GCC and Binutils from source, the toolchain we supply in our RPM builds does not do this. We only align the architecture selection to the minimum architecture level required by the distribution.

Consequently, developers need to pay attention to build flags, and manage them according to the needs of their project for optimization, level of warning and error detection, and security hardening.

Continue reading “Recommended compiler and linker flags for GCC”

Share
Getting started with go-toolset

Getting started with go-toolset

One of the new software collections we’ve introduced this fall is for Go, the programming language that aims to make it easy to build simple, reliable, and efficient software. Go is a compiled, statically typed language in the C/C++ tradition with garbage collection, concurrent programming support, and memory safety features.

In go-toolset-7, we’re including everything you need to start programming in Go on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, in the familiar format of software collections. In this release, we’re shipping golang as a Tech Preview. (NOTE: The “-7” in our toolset name is to sync with the other collections now being released, devtoolset-7, rust-toolset-7, and llvm-toolset-7.)

Continue reading “Getting started with go-toolset”

Share