Lucas Holmquist

Sr. Software Engineer at Red Hat. Formerly of the Mobile team, where he focused on the mobile web and front-end development, he is now mostly focused on the Node.js developer experience on Openshift. While I am not a Node expert, I do pretend to be one at work

Recent Posts

Deploying Node.js applications to Kubernetes with Nodeshift and Minikube

Deploying Node.js applications to Kubernetes with Nodeshift and Minikube

In a previous article, I showed how easy it was to deploy a Node.js application during development to Red Hat OpenShift using the Nodeshift command-line interface (CLI). In this article, we will take a look at using Nodeshift to deploy Node.js applications to vanilla Kubernetes—specifically, with Minikube.

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Add standardized support information to your Node.js modules

Add standardized support information to your Node.js modules

The Nodeshift team recently improved the consistency of the projects we use to maintain our Node.js modules. We made sure that the same linter and tests—ESLint and Tape, for those interested—were used on all projects. We also added support information for the modules we publish to the npm registry. We looked to the Node.js Package Maintenance Working Group for the standardized support information to add.

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Deploying serverless Node.js applications on Red Hat OpenShift, Part 1

Deploying serverless Node.js applications on Red Hat OpenShift, Part 1

Red Hat OpenShift Serverless recently became GA, and with it came new options for application deployment. This article introduces one of those new options, Knative Serving. I provide an overview of OpenShift Serverless and Knative Serving, then show you how to deploy a Node.js application as a Knative Serving service.

What is OpenShift Serverless?

According to the OpenShift Serverless GA release:

OpenShift Serverless enables developers to build what they want, when they want, with whatever tools and languages they need. Developers can quickly get their applications up and deployed using serverless compute, and they won’t have to build and maintain larger container images to do so.

OpenShift Serverless is based on the Knative open source Kubernetes serverless project. While it has a few different parts, we will focus on deploying a serverless Node.js application as a Knative Serving service.

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Use Node.js 14 on Red Hat OpenShift

Use Node.js 14 on Red Hat OpenShift

On April 21st, Node.js released its latest major version with Node.js 14. Because this is an even-numbered release, it will become a Long Term Support (LTS) release in October 2020. This release brings a host of improvements and features, such as improved diagnostics, a V8 upgrade, an experimental Async Local Storage API, hardened the streams APIs, and more.

While Red Hat will release a Universal Base Image (UBI) for Node.js 14 in the coming months for Red Hat OpenShift and Red Hat Enterprise Linux, this article helps you get started today. If you’re interested in more about Node.js 14’s improvements and new features, check out the article listed at the end.

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Modern web applications on OpenShift, Part 4: Openshift Pipelines

Modern web applications on OpenShift, Part 4: Openshift Pipelines

When I wrote part 3 of this series, Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 3 — OpenShift as a development environment, I said that was the final part. However, there is new tech that fits in very nicely with deploying modern Web Applications to OpenShift, so part 4 is necessary. As a refresher, in the first article, we looked at how to deploy a modern web application using the fewest commands. In the second part, we took a deeper look into how the new source-to-image (S2I) web app builder works and how to use it as part of a chained build. In the third, we took a look at how to run your app’s “development workflow” on Red Hat OpenShift. This article talks about OpenShift Pipelines and how this tool can be used as an alternative to a chained build.

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Easily deploy Node.js applications to Red Hat OpenShift using Nodeshift

Easily deploy Node.js applications to Red Hat OpenShift using Nodeshift

I recently wrote articles on deploying an Express.js application to OpenShift, how to debug your Node.js application on OpenShift with Chrome Dev Tools and a short series on deploying modern web applications to OpenShift. All of those articles used a node module called Nodeshift, but I did a Jedi, hand-wavy thing when talking about it. This next series of articles takes a deeper look at what Nodeshift is and how it is used to ease the deployment of Node.js apps to OpenShift during development.

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Use Node.js 12 on Red Hat OpenShift today

Use Node.js 12 on Red Hat OpenShift today

On April 23, Node.js released its latest major version with Node.js 12. Because this is an even-numbered release, it will become a Long Term Support (LTS) release in October, code-named Erbium.

This release brings a host of improvements and features, which this blog post isn’t going to cover. Instead, I will focus on how to start using this new release today on Red Hat OpenShift. If you’re interested in more about the various improvements and new features, check out the articles listed at the end of this post.

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