How to enable/disable repository using Subscription Manager or Yum-Utils

This blog is to resolve the following issues/answering the following questions.

  1. How to enable a repository using the Red Hat Subscription Manager/yum?
  2. Need to access a repository using the Red Hat Subscription Manager/yum?
  3. How to disable a repository using the Red Hat Subscription Manager/yum?
  4. How to subscribe a child channel using the Red Hat Subscription Manager/yum?

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Top 10 "Yum" installables to be productive as a developer on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) is not Ubuntu. Out of the box, it seems the default packages installed for developers are somewhat limited. To provide exceptional long-term stability, Red Hat takes a different approach to default packages and software repositories (repos). Development tools aren’t installed unless specifically selected. The repos that are initially enabled only contain packages that Red Hat supports over the long term lifecycle of RHEL. Because RHEL’s default repos don’t have as large a selection of development tools as other freely available operating systems’ servers, that doesn’t mean you are out of luck. Enabling a few additional repos from Red Hat and a third party makes a wide variety of packages available using the same familiar yum commands.

In preparing to write this article, I spent hours scouring RHEL’s package lists in order to highlight some of the most useful “yum” installables that you can use to supercharge your development productivity. Some are available from the default repos, others require enabling an additional repo which I’ll point out. Here are my top 10.

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Why Red Hat’s new ‘dnf’ package manager is not “just another ‘yum'”

Around this time last year, Fedora 22 brought a major update for anyone working under the Fedora hood — Yum was deprecated and replaced by DNF.  It brings some significant changes:

  • Faster, more mathematically correct method for solving dependency resolution
  • A “clean”, well documented Python API with C bindings &
  • Python 3 support

Isn’t this a Release by Another Name?

No, DNF marks a shift, and not just a fork to Python 3, C support and cleaner docs.  The move to libsolv, librepo and a slim, planned API means Yum’s organic sprawl and bespoke depsolving are being phased out.

The shift solves old depsolving problems and readies DNF for some of the changes afoot in the devops world — e.g. empowered and independent devops-ers who don’t want to reinvent the wheel on each deploy.  Whether that warrants more than a major release is a bike-shed argument.

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