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Auto-generating news and publishing it to WordPress with Apache Camel

Auto-generating news and publishing it to WordPress with Apache Camel

With the release of Apache Camel 2.21, some new components were added to the project and Camel WordPress was one of them. Camel is one of the upstream community projects for Red Hat Fuse. In this article, we will see how to use this new component to publish an auto-generated news post based on a soccer statistics API. The example consumes the statistics API, generates the text based on a Natural Language Generation (NLG) library and then publishes it to the WordPress blog.

WordPress is one of the most used open source tools for creating websites. More than 30% of the web is built on top of WordPress. Besides creating websites, blogs, and apps, WordPress leverages a huge plugin repository maintained by a passionate community. There are even plugins that can turn a WordPress website into an e-commerce platform.

Since version 4.7, WordPress exposes a REST API capable of interacting with its resources, for example, users, categories, pages, posts, and custom types. Now it’s possible for third parties to integrate with the WordPress platform and perform almost anything with their resources.

Some companies implement internal websites, blogs, and project sites using WordPress. Integrating such platforms with another company’s components—such as CRM, ERP, LDAP, and Calendar Services—would add extra value to WordPress-based projects. Camel WordPress can help integrate those components easily. To get started using this new component, nothing is better than a demo.

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Putting OpenShift under pressure – a case study

Putting OpenShift under pressure – a case study

About a year ago, Red Hat Product Security decided to move its blog, the Red Hat Security Blog, off of WordPress.com’s infrastructure and onto Red Hat’s OpenShift.  There were some initial growing pains since this was a relatively new thing to do, but it wasn’t long before the blog was in a stable environment.  There were plans to put the application on a larger gear (it was hosted on a small gear) and to make it scalable (it wasn’t), but as most things go, when stability increases you end up forgetting about making the changes as other issues need to be addressed that aren’t related to your application’s backend.  And for that year WordPress, on a small gear, on OpenShift just worked.

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