Eclipse Vert.x logo

When Vert.x Meets Reactive eXtensions (Part 5 of Introduction to Vert.x)

This post is the fifth post of my Introduction to Eclipse Vert.x series. In the last post, we saw how Vert.x can interact with a database. To tame the asynchronous nature of Vert.x, we used Future objects. In this post, we are going to see another way to manage asynchronous code: reactive programming. We will see how Vert.x combined with Reactive eXtensions gives you superpowers.

Let’s start by refreshing our memory with the previous posts:

  • The first post described how to build a Vert.x application with Apache Maven and execute unit tests.
  • The second post described how this application became configurable.
  • The third post introduced vertx-web, and a collection management application was developed. This application exposes a REST API used by an HTML/JavaScript front end.
  • In the fourth post, we replaced the in-memory back end with a database and introduced Future to orchestrate our asynchronous operations.

In this post, we are not going to add a new feature. Instead, we’ll explore another programming paradigm: reactive programming.

Continue reading “When Vert.x Meets Reactive eXtensions (Part 5 of Introduction to Vert.x)”

Share
Eclipse Vert.x logo

Accessing Data – The Reactive Way

This is the fourth post of my “Introduction to Eclipse Vert.x.” series. In this article, we are going to see how we can use JDBC in an Eclipse Vert.x application using the asynchronous API provided by the vertx-jdbc-client. But before diving into JDBC and other SQL subtleties, we are going to talk about Vert.x Futures.

In “The Introduction to Vert.x” Series

Let’s start by refreshing our memory about the previous articles:

  1. The first post described how to build a vert.x application with Maven and execute unit tests.
  2. The second post reviewed how this application became configurable.
  3. The third post introduced vertx-web, and a collection management application was developed. This application exposes a REST API used by an HTML/JavaScript frontend.

Continue reading “Accessing Data – The Reactive Way”

Share
Eclipse Vert.x logo

Some REST with Vert.x (Part 3 of Introduction to Vert.x)

This post is the third in a series on the Introduction to Eclipse Vert.x. So, let’s have a quick look back at the content of the previous posts. In the first post, we developed a very simple Eclipse Vert.x application and saw how this application can be tested, packaged, and executed. In the second post, we saw how this application became configurable and how we can use a random port in a test.

Well, nothing fancy… Let’s go a bit further this time and develop a CRUD-ish / REST-ish application. So an application exposing an HTML page interacting with the backend using a REST API. The level of RESTfulness of the API is not the topic of this post; I leave it you to decide as it’s a very slippery topic.

So, in other words, we are going to see:

  • Vert.x Web – a framework to let you create web applications easily using Vert.x.
  • How to expose static resources.
  • How to develop a REST API.

Continue reading “Some REST with Vert.x (Part 3 of Introduction to Vert.x)”

Share
Eclipse Vert.x logo

Eclipse Vert.x Application Configuration (Part 2 of Introduction to Vert.x)

In my previous post, Introduction to Eclipse Vert.x, we developed a very simple Vert.x application and saw how this application can be tested, packaged, and executed. That was nice, wasn’t it? Well, that was only the beginning. In this post, we are going to enhance our application to support external configuration, and learn how to deal with different configuration sources.

Continue reading “Eclipse Vert.x Application Configuration (Part 2 of Introduction to Vert.x)”

Share

Visualizing Smog Sensor Data with the help of Vert.x, Prometheus, and Grafana

Air pollution is a major problem in many cities around the globe. Some people in Stuttgart, Germany have developed cheap smog sensors that people can install on their balconies and other convenient places and then report data to a central site. I have written about that on OpenSource.com. The data is sent to a central server, from where it is visualized on a map. At the time of writing the above article, there was no way of seeing how the value has changed over time. Meanwhile, there is a visualization of the last 24 hours available on the map.

Continue reading “Visualizing Smog Sensor Data with the help of Vert.x, Prometheus, and Grafana”

Share

Technical Cheat Sheets for Developers

Over the past few months, we’ve been building and releasing a variety of technical cheat sheets and we’ve been getting many requests for more.  We are working on new cheat sheets every day, ok maybe not weekends, but almost every day. Here are the cheat sheets available today: Linux Commands Cheat SheetAdvanced Linux Commands Cheat SheetWildfly Swarm Cheat SheetContainers Cheat SheetMongoDB Cheat SheetKubernetes Cheat Sheet and the Eclipse Vert.x Cheat Sheet.

Continue reading “Technical Cheat Sheets for Developers”

Share

Continuously Building a Book

I’m thrilled to announce the availability of a mini-book about Eclipse Vert.x. This book focuses on the development of reactive microservices in Java and covers reactive systems and reactive programming.

Writing a book, even for a mini-book is a tough task. While writing code and writing a book are very different experiences, you can apply the same process and good practice. I would like to list a couple of tips I’ve used to make the writing a bit easier.

Continue reading “Continuously Building a Book”

Share

Eclipse Vert.x Core Cheat Sheet

Eclipse Vert.x is a toolkit used to build reactive and distributed systems on the Java Virtual Machine. Vert.x supports a variety of languages letting you choose which one you’d prefer. The Vert.x Core cheat sheet covers the creation of a project using Apache Maven, Gradle or the Vert.x CLI, and references most common Vert.x Core APIs, in 3 different languages (Java, JavaScript, and Groovy). Forgot how to create an HTTP server, use the HTTP client, implement a request-response on the event bus?  Just check the cheat sheet. Together with the Red Hat Developer Team, I’ve put together this handy cheat sheet – hopefully, you’ll find it useful too!

Continue reading Eclipse Vert.x Core Cheat Sheet

Share