systemtap

How Long Does It Take to …

One common idiom in performance monitoring is how long did it take for a program to do something. For example you may want to know the time taken for database queries in PostgreSQL or just-in-time translations in a Java Virtual Machine. SystemTap and user-space markers in Linux packages make it much easier to determine the duration of those operations.

The user-space markers compiled into Linux packages mark key points in the code where particular actions occur. The user-space markers also provide arguments that provide additional information about the action. For example, the markers and the available arguments in PostgreSQL can be listed using using the SystemTap command:

$ stap -L 'process("postgres").mark("*")'

The two user-space markers related to the start and completion of a query are:

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Starting with SystemTap

As I stare at this blank screen to start writing my first blog entry I have that same feeling that so many developers have when starting with an unfamiliar programming language or application.  The developers in our group realize that it is not easy starting from nothing and we strive to make it easier to productively use SystemTap to investigate performance problems.

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7 ways to improve your application’s performance with the new Developer Toolset 1.1 release

Are you missing out on opportunities to increase your applications’ performance? As an application developer building on Red Hat Enterprise Linux, you invest a lot of time and effort into making your applications compelling and useful for your users. You probably also want to see good performance. But beyond good design, careful algorithm selection and compiler optimizations, what can a developer use to boost their application performance?

1. The latest GCC release and associated tools

The very first thing a Red Hat Enterprise Linux developer should be aware of is the availability of Red Hat Developer Toolset. I described the content and architecture of this new offering from Red Hat in my last blog post. Developer Toolset 1.x gives you the gcc-4.7 toolchain, which, at the time of writing, is the current upstream major release.

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Red Hat Developer Toolset 1.1 Now Available through Developer-focused Subscriptions

Today Red Hat announces the general availability of version 1.1 of Red Hat Developer Toolset through Red Hat Enterprise Linux Developer Subscriptions. For developers, having ready access to the latest, stable development tools is key to taking advantage of open source innovation. Red Hat Developer Toolset 1.1 bridges development agility with production stability by delivering the latest stable versions of essential C and C++ development tools. By employing Red Hat Developer Toolset, organizations can significantly increase developer productivity and improve deployment times.

Red Hat Developer Toolset helps to reduce development and deployment time by allowing users to compile once for multiple versions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux and more easily diagnose and debug applications in development. Using Red Hat Developer Toolset, software developers can develop applications that run on multiple versions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Applications developed on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 can run on both Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.

Red Hat Developer Toolset 1.1 delivers the following significant enhancements:

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