Cloud-native development with Microprofile 1.2

The purpose of this blog post is to provide an overview of the APIs and specifications in the Eclipse Microprofile 1.2 release. In particular, I’ll try to connect these specifications and APIs with their architectural purpose. Where do they fit and why? If you’re thinking of moving your Java application to the cloud, then this post might be for you.

Continue reading “Cloud-native development with Microprofile 1.2”

Share

Beta Testing in the Ever-Changing World of Automation

Beta testing is fundamentally all about the testing of a product performed by real users in a real environment. There are many tags we use to refer to the testing of similar characteristics, such as User Acceptance Testing (UAT), Customer Acceptance Testing (CAT), Customer Validation, and Field Testing (more popular in Europe). Whichever tag we use for these testing cases, the basic components are more or less the same. To discover and fix potential issues, this involves the user and front-end user interface (UI) testing, as well as the user experience (UX) related testing. This always happens in the iteration of the software development lifecycle (SDLC) where the idea has transformed into design and has passed the development phases, while the unit and integration testing has already been completed.

Continue reading “Beta Testing in the Ever-Changing World of Automation”

Share

Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (November 2017): Parallelism and Concurrency

Several Red Hat engineers attended the JTC1/SC22/WG21 C++ Standards Committee meetings in November 2017. This post focuses on the sessions of SG1, the study group on parallelism and concurrency. SG1 had a full schedule as usual, with Executors, Futures, and deferred reclamation mechanisms (e.g., RCU) being major discussion topics. We also started to track the state of proposals and topics we will need to discuss in a publicly accessible bug tracker.

Continue reading “Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (November 2017): Parallelism and Concurrency”

Share

Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (July 2017): Parallelism and Concurrency

Several Red Hat engineers attended the JTC1/SC22/WG21 C++ Standards Committee meetings in July 2017. This post focuses on the sessions of SG1, the study group on parallelism and concurrency.  We discussed several synchronization-related proposals, improvements for futures, and, of course, executors. Also, I proposed a few steps that the SG1 community could take to get more efficient in how it conducts its work, which are all inspired by how successful open source projects work.

Continue reading “Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (July 2017): Parallelism and Concurrency”

Share

Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meetings (November 2016, Issaquah, and February 2017, Kona): Library

I attended the recent Issaquah and Kona ISO C++ standards meetings, representing Red Hat and the GCC project, and helping to complete the C++17 standard. As usual, I spent the majority of my time in the Library Working Group (LWG) sessions, but also took part in a subgroup focusing on the Filesystem library, more on that below.

Continue reading “Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meetings (November 2016, Issaquah, and February 2017, Kona): Library”

Share

Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (March 2017): Parallelism and Concurrency

Several Red Hat engineers attended the JTC1/SC22/WG21 C++ Standards Committee meetings in March 2017. This post focuses on the sessions of SG1, the study group on parallelism and concurrency. The major topics of work of the week were (1) further polishing of the parallel algorithms in the C++17 draft, (2) making progress on the executors proposal (which provides mechanisms to control how parallel work is executed, for example on which resources), and (3) continuing work on proposals targeting the Concurrency Technical Specification version 2. We also discussed an important aspect of enabling standard C++ code to execute on GPUs, which is a topic that several people in SG1 have a lot of interest in — I certainly do, for example.

Continue reading “Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (March 2017): Parallelism and Concurrency”

Share

Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (June 2016, Oulu): Library

The recent WG21 meeting in Oulu, Finland, was an especially busy one for the Library Working Group. Every day was spent working through the list of proposals intended for inclusion in C++17, and we also had three “evening” sessions that ran well past the evening (until nearly midnight, although the sun was still up to trick us into working late).

This post describes what I think are the most important library features that were reviewed and approved for inclusion in C++17. As usual, see Jason and Torvald’s posts for news from the Core and Parallelism & Concurrency groups. As Jason explained, the main goal of the Oulu meeting was to finalize the content of the Committee Draft (CD) for C++17. The Library Working Group started the meeting with a huge number of papers intended for inclusion in the CD, and we managed to complete the review of almost all of them.

Continue reading “Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (June 2016, Oulu): Library”

Share