source-to-image

Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 2 — Using chained builds

Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 2 — Using chained builds

In the previous post, we took a quick look at a new source-to-image (S2I) builder image designed for building and deploying modern web applications on OpenShift. While the last post was focused on getting your app deployed quickly, this post will look at how to use the S2I image as a “pure” builder image and combine it with an OpenShift chained build.

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Source versus binary S2I workflows with Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Source versus binary S2I workflows with Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Red Hat OpenShift supports two workflows for building container images for applications: the source and the binary workflows. The binary workflow is the primary focus of the Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes and Red Hat Fuse product documentation and training, while the source workflow is the focus of most of the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform product documentation and training. All of the standard OpenShift Quick Application Templates are based on the source workflow.

A developer might ask, “Can I use both workflows on the same project?” or, “Is there a reason to prefer one workflow over the other?” As a member of the team that developed Red Hat certification training for OpenShift and Red Hat Fuse, I had these questions myself and I hope that this article helps you find your own answers to these questions.

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Flexible Images or Using S2I for Image Configuration

Flexible Images or Using S2I for Image Configuration

Container images usually come with pre-defined tools or services with minimal or limited possibilities of further configuration. This brought us into a way of thinking of how to provide images that contain reasonable default settings but are, at the same time, easy to extend. And to make it more fun, this would be possible to achieve both on a single Linux host and in an orchestrated OpenShift environment.

Source-to-image (S2I) has been introduced three years ago to allow developers to build containerized applications by simply providing source code as an input. So why couldn’t we use it to make configuration files as an input instead? We can, of course!

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Node, S2I and Docker

Node, S2I and Docker

Intro

I like Node.js and I like Docker. While I am not an expert on either, I do pretend to be one at work.

Lately, I’ve been looking at Openshift CDK and how I can develop Node.js apps against it. Specifically, I was looking at the MSA Hello World Demo and the Bonjour microservice.

I also recently wrote about setting up a CDK environment on a freshly re-installed MacBook Pro.  I would check it out; it’s some good writing.

My initial goal was to figure out how to “containerize” a Node.js application and then put it on my local openshift VM, but when I started to look at it little deeper, I found a few different ways of doing it. Hopefully, this post will go into the different ways.

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