software collections

PHP 5.4 on RHEL-6 using RHSCL

Official announcement : Red Hat Software Collections 1.0 Beta Now Available

More information on Software Collections

Stability addicts can keep quiet, PHP 5.3.3 is still the standard version provided with RHEL-6.

We’ll soon have an official and supported way to install PHP version 5.4, beside the system version, without any effect on installed components. The announcement tells us the life cycle will be 3 years.

Warning:  it’s a beta version, published for evaluation purposes.

Installation

Activation of the distribution channel (requires a valid subscription) from the RHN web interface or from command line:

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Red Hat Software Collections 1.0 Beta Now Available

You may have seen references to “software collections” in this blog, but this is different.  “Red Hat Software Collections”, now in beta for the first time, is a collection of refreshed and supported web/dynamic languages and databases for Red Hat Enterprise Linux.   Now you can have two versions of software on one OS, or refresh these languages and databases more frequently.  See this list below!

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RHEL Developer Toolkit 2.0 now in beta

Just under a year ago, we introduced the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Developer Toolset 1.0 which provides the latest, stable open source developer tool versions at an accelerated cadence than that of Red Hat Enterprise Linux.  That version started with gcc 4.7 and gdb 7.4.  Since then, we’ve added V1.1 with some additional components and today we are announcing V2.0  beta that adds Eclipse, and more:

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Unleashing Power of WebSockets on RHEL 6

WebSockets are a rising technology that solves one of the great needs of web development – full duplex communication between a browser (or a different client) and a server.

Let’s imagine a simple scenario – live web chat. In the past, you’d probably use AJAX and polling to make new posts appear in realtime. The downside is that implementing all that is not entirely easy and it tends to put a lot of strain on the server.

This article will show you how to implement a simple web chat using WebSockets, thus eliminating the above problems. We will be using the Tornado web server with the Flask framework, producing a pure Python solution. To get the maximum out of Python 2.x, we will utilize the python27 Software Collection (SCL). We will also need a newer version of Firefox that supports WebSocket technology, so that we can test from the RHEL 6 machine that we’re developing on.

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Setting up Django and Python 2.7 on Red Hat Enterprise 6 the easy way

Recently, I needed to get Django installed with Python 2.7 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. As this is not a directly supported activity, I wanted to document how I went about it. As you might imagine, the generally expected method for install would be to grab the Python 2.7 source tree and then build it. Obviously, that can be a lot of work; is not particularly repeatable; and, potentially, exposes you to more security flaws. As a result, I decided to try to leverage a “new’ish” technology developed (in the open) by Red Hat called Software Collections. An in depth discussion of Software Collections is for another post, for now we just need to know that Software Collections are rpms that contain all (or most) of their supporting libraries, install under /opt, are updatable through yum, and, the core software collections code (scl-utils) is supported by Red Hat. A number of collections have been created and released by the community at http://bit.ly/fedora-scl.

OK, getting started. I created a new VM using a RHEL 6.3 image on an instance of RHOS (Red Hat Open Stack),

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7 ways to improve your application’s performance with the new Developer Toolset 1.1 release

Are you missing out on opportunities to increase your applications’ performance? As an application developer building on Red Hat Enterprise Linux, you invest a lot of time and effort into making your applications compelling and useful for your users. You probably also want to see good performance. But beyond good design, careful algorithm selection and compiler optimizations, what can a developer use to boost their application performance?

1. The latest GCC release and associated tools

The very first thing a Red Hat Enterprise Linux developer should be aware of is the availability of Red Hat Developer Toolset. I described the content and architecture of this new offering from Red Hat in my last blog post. Developer Toolset 1.x gives you the gcc-4.7 toolchain, which, at the time of writing, is the current upstream major release.

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Ruby on Rails 3.2 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 with Software Collections

While Red Hat Enterprise Linux is known for its stability and flexibility, you might not think of it first when looking for the latest version of your web application framework. If you’re a developer working with Ruby and Ruby on Rails, you probably want to take advantage of their new features. Sure, you can use RVM, but sometimes you just want to get supported system packages.

Software Collections (often abbreviated as SCL) allows you to run more recent versions of software than what ships with your current version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. This article will show you how to start development of a Rails 3.2 application running on Ruby 1.9.3 – all on RHEL 6, using only RPM packages, alongside your default Ruby installation. This tutorial assumes that you are familiar with Ruby on Rails basics, such as creating a new application and using bundler. It is also beneficial (although not necessary) to understand how Software Collections work in general.

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Software Collections on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Did you ever wish you had newer versions of the software on your Red Hat Enterprise Linux machines? You are probably not alone. Providing new versions of software in rpm is hard, because rpm supports only one version installed on your computer at a time. Multiple versions on one machine can conflict with each other or create unpredictable behaviour in applications that you might not have considered dependencies.

Last year, we developed Software Collections to allow you to install newer versions of software in rpm safely into /opt and switch between new and old releases. This allows your Red Hat Enterprise Linux system applications to continue to run with the old version, while new apps can work with the new version. A good example of this is Python; many essential packages are written in Python. How can you update to the latest release of Python without causing half your system to break? Through Software Collections, you can install a newer version of Python – for example python-3.3 – into /opt avoiding conflicts in files and strange behaviour of apps that depend on an older version of Python.

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