single sign-on

How to secure microservices with Red Hat Single Sign-On, Fuse, and 3scale

How to secure microservices with Red Hat Single Sign-On, Fuse, and 3scale

In this article, we’ll cover microservice security concepts by using protocols such as OpenID Connect with the support of Red Hat Single Sign-On and 3scale. Working with a microservice-based architecture, user identity, and access control in a distributed, in-depth form must be carefully designed. Here, the integration of these tools will be detailed, step-by-step, in a realistic view.

This article exemplifies the use of tools that can securely run your businesses, avoiding using homemade solutions, and protecting your services by using an API gateway, preventing your applications from being exposed to the public network. The use of an API gateway also provides additional access control, monetization, and analytics.

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Using a public certificate with Red Hat Single Sign-On/Keycloak

Using a public certificate with Red Hat Single Sign-On/Keycloak

When deploying Red Hat Single Sign-On/Keycloak for a test or a proof of concept, most users will choose to use a self-signed certificate as explained in the official documentation.

The setup instructions are straightforward, but this self-signed certificate will trigger certificate error messages in your web browser and can also prevent some clients such as Postman from working properly.

This article explains how to use a public certificate from Let’s Encrypt with Red Hat Single Sign-On.

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