The Diamond in the Rough: Effective Vulnerability Management with OWASP DefectDojo

Managing the security of your projects applications can be an overwhelming and unmanageable task. In today’s world, the number of newly created frameworks and languages is continuing to increase and they each have their own security drawbacks associated with them.

The wide variety of security scanners available can help find vulnerabilities in your projects, but some scanners only work with certain languages and they each have different reporting output formats. Creating reports for customers or managers and viewing analytics using different security tools in different projects can be a very time-consuming task.

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Using Snyk, NSP and Retire.JS to Identify and Fix Vulnerable Dependencies in your Node.js Applications

Introduction

Dependency management isn’t anything new, however, it has become more of an issue in recent times due to the popularity of frameworks and languages, which have large numbers of 3rd party plugins and modules. With Node.js, keeping dependencies secure is an ongoing and time-consuming task because the majority of Node.js projects rely on publicly available modules or libraries to add functionality. Instead of developers writing code, they end up adding a large number of libraries to their applications. The major benefit of this is the speed at which development can take place. However, with great benefits can also come great pitfalls, this is especially true when it comes to security. As a result of these risks, the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) currently ranks “Using Components with Known Vulnerabilities” in the top ten most critical web application vulnerabilities in their latest report.

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Diagnosing Function Pointer Security Flaws with a GCC plugin

A few months ago, I had to write some internal GCC passes to perform static analysis on the GNU C Library (glibc). I figured I might as well write them as plugins since they were unlikely to see the light of day outside of my little sandbox. Being a long time GCC contributor, but having no experience writing plugins I thought it’d be a good way to eat our own dog food, and perhaps write about my experience.

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End To End Encryption With OpenShift Part 1: Two-Way SSL

This is the first part of a 2 part article, part 2 (End To End Encryption With OpenShift Part 2: Re-encryption) will be authored by Matyas Danter, Sr Consultant with Red Hat, it will be published soon.

This article aims to demonstrate use cases for Openshift routes to achieve end-to-end encryption. This is a desirable and sometimes mandated configuration for many verticals, which deal with strict regulations.

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