Flexible Images or Using S2I for Image Configuration

Container images usually come with pre-defined tools or services with minimal or limited possibilities of further configuration. This brought us into a way of thinking of how to provide images that contain reasonable default settings but are, at the same time, easy to extend. And to make it more fun, this would be possible to achieve both on a single Linux host and in an orchestrated OpenShift environment.

Source-to-image (S2I) has been introduced three years ago to allow developers to build containerized applications by simply providing source code as an input. So why couldn’t we use it to make configuration files as an input instead? We can, of course!

Continue reading “Flexible Images or Using S2I for Image Configuration”


To learn more, visit our Linux containers or microservices Topic pages.

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Installing Node.js dependencies with Yarn via s2i builds and OpenShift

Building a docker formatted container image for a Node.js application

There are 2 main strategies for building an image for a Node.js Application. The most common strategy is simply using a Dockerfile with a base image of something like FROM node:4-onbuild. Then do a docker build. This will produce an image with your application in it, ready to be run. This strategy is known as the Docker strategy in an OpenShift BuildConfig.

Another strategy is using the s2i tool for taking the application source from a repository and producing the image. A typical command would be.s2i build git@github.com/me/myrepo.git bucharestgold/centos7-s2i-nodejs:latest myapp. With this strategy, there is no explicit Dockerfile. It is known as the Source strategy in an OpenShift BuildConfig.

Continue reading “Installing Node.js dependencies with Yarn via s2i builds and OpenShift”


To learn more, visit our Linux containers or microservices Topic pages.

Join the Red Hat Developer Program (it’s free) and get access to related cheat sheets (e.g. containers), books (e.g. microservices), and product downloads that can help you with your microservices and/or container application development.


For more information about Red Hat OpenShift and other related topics, visit: OpenShift, OpenShift Online.

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OpenShift and DevOps: The CoolStore Microservices Example

Hi folks,

Today I want to talk about the demo we presented @ OpenShift Container Platform Roadshow in Milan & Rome last week.

The demo was based on JBoss team’s great work available on this repo:
https://github.com/jbossdemocentral/coolstore-microservice

Continue reading “OpenShift and DevOps: The CoolStore Microservices Example”


Join the Red Hat Developer Program (it’s free) and get access to related cheat sheets, books, and product downloads.


To learn more, visit our Linux containers or microservices Topic pages.

Join the Red Hat Developer Program (it’s free) and get access to related cheat sheets (e.g. containers), books (e.g. microservices), and product downloads that can help you with your microservices and/or container application development.


Who’s your Brent?

To learn more, visit our DevOps Topic page

Join the Red Hat Developer Program (it’s free) and get access to related cheat sheets, books, and product downloads that can help you with your DevOps efforts.


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Node, S2I and Docker

Intro

I like Node.js and I like Docker. While I am not an expert on either, I do pretend to be one at work.

Lately, I’ve been looking at Openshift CDK and how I can develop Node.js apps against it. Specifically, I was looking at the MSA Hello World Demo and the Bonjour microservice.

I also recently wrote about setting up a CDK environment on a freshly re-installed MacBook Pro.  I would check it out; it’s some good writing.

My initial goal was to figure out how to “containerize” a Node.js application and then put it on my local openshift VM, but when I started to look at it little deeper, I found a few different ways of doing it. Hopefully, this post will go into the different ways.

Continue reading “Node, S2I and Docker”


Join the Red Hat Developer Program (it’s free) and get access to related cheat sheets, books, and product downloads.


To learn more, visit our Linux containers or microservices Topic pages.

Join the Red Hat Developer Program (it’s free) and get access to related cheat sheets (e.g. containers), books (e.g. microservices), and product downloads that can help you with your microservices and/or container application development.

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