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A Puppet Module for tuned-adm

Some months ago, I developed and released a small Puppet module for tuned-adm. As this tool is a nice feature of RHEL, I think it is only fair from me to advertise about it here, on the Red Hat developer blog.

Quick overview of ‘tuned-adm’

(Photo credit: Accretion Disc)

To make this brief, this command will take care of tuning the operating system for you, based on the usage you want to make of it. For instance, if you want this system to be a regular server, you’ll use the ‘throughput-performance’ profile, while if you are running your Linux kernel on a laptop, you might prefer the ‘powersave’ profile, to protect your battery, and make it last longer.

To have a better idea of what options are available on your system, you can simply run the following command:

$ tuned-adm list
Available profiles:
- virtual-guest
- latency-performance
- powersave
- balanced
- throughput-performance
- virtual-host
Current active profile: /usr/lib/tuned/powersave/tuned.conf

And with the command ‘active’, you can quickly check, which profile has been activated:

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Red Hat Software Collections 1.0 Beta Now Available

You may have seen references to “software collections” in this blog, but this is different.  “Red Hat Software Collections”, now in beta for the first time, is a collection of refreshed and supported web/dynamic languages and databases for Red Hat Enterprise Linux.   Now you can have two versions of software on one OS, or refresh these languages and databases more frequently.  See this list below!

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Ruby on Rails 3.2 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 with Software Collections

While Red Hat Enterprise Linux is known for its stability and flexibility, you might not think of it first when looking for the latest version of your web application framework. If you’re a developer working with Ruby and Ruby on Rails, you probably want to take advantage of their new features. Sure, you can use RVM, but sometimes you just want to get supported system packages.

Software Collections (often abbreviated as SCL) allows you to run more recent versions of software than what ships with your current version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. This article will show you how to start development of a Rails 3.2 application running on Ruby 1.9.3 – all on RHEL 6, using only RPM packages, alongside your default Ruby installation. This tutorial assumes that you are familiar with Ruby on Rails basics, such as creating a new application and using bundler. It is also beneficial (although not necessary) to understand how Software Collections work in general.

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Software Collections on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Did you ever wish you had newer versions of the software on your Red Hat Enterprise Linux machines? You are probably not alone. Providing new versions of software in rpm is hard, because rpm supports only one version installed on your computer at a time. Multiple versions on one machine can conflict with each other or create unpredictable behaviour in applications that you might not have considered dependencies.

Last year, we developed Software Collections to allow you to install newer versions of software in rpm safely into /opt and switch between new and old releases. This allows your Red Hat Enterprise Linux system applications to continue to run with the old version, while new apps can work with the new version. A good example of this is Python; many essential packages are written in Python. How can you update to the latest release of Python without causing half your system to break? Through Software Collections, you can install a newer version of Python – for example python-3.3 – into /opt avoiding conflicts in files and strange behaviour of apps that depend on an older version of Python.

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