RHEL

Red Hat build of Node.js 14 brings diagnostic reporting, metering, and more

Red Hat build of Node.js 14 brings diagnostic reporting, metering, and more

The latest Red Hat build of Node.js 14 long-term support (LTS) release. This build brings new features such as diagnostic reporting, full-icu internationalization support, and Red Hat OpenShift integration. We’ve also included tech preview features such as the new AsyncLocalStorage class, and we’ve updated our documentation and interactive developer learning scenarios. Keep reading for an overview of what’s new and how to get started with the Red Hat build of Node.js 14.

Continue reading Red Hat build of Node.js 14 brings diagnostic reporting, metering, and more

Share
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.3 supports faster service and workload delivery

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.3 supports faster service and workload delivery

Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.3 was announced last week and is now generally available. We encourage Linux developers to download this update and give it a try. We also recommend updating both development and production systems to the new 8.3 release. This article is an overview of the developer highlights of RHEL 8.3, including new application streams for Node.js 14, Ruby 2.7, PHP 7.4, GCC Toolset 10, and more.

Continue reading Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.3 supports faster service and workload delivery

Share
Red Hat Software Collections 3.6 now available in beta

Red Hat Software Collections 3.6 now available in beta

Red Hat Software Collections 3.6 and Red Hat Developer Toolset 10 for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) are now available as beta releases. An alternative to the default RHEL toolset, Software Collections provides a differentiated and eclectic mix of tools that developers can use on a desktop or in production.

Continue reading Red Hat Software Collections 3.6 now available in beta

Share
Using Microsoft SQL Server on Red Hat OpenShift

Using Microsoft SQL Server on Red Hat OpenShift

In this article, you’ll learn how to deploy Microsoft SQL Server 2019 on Red Hat OpenShift. We’ll then use SQL Server from an ASP.NET Core application that is also deployed on OpenShift. Next, I’ll show you how to connect to SQL Server while working on the application from your local development machine. And finally, we’ll connect to the server using Azure Data Studio.

Continue reading Using Microsoft SQL Server on Red Hat OpenShift

Share
Install Red Hat OpenShift Operators on your laptop using Red Hat CodeReady Containers and Red Hat Marketplace

Install Red Hat OpenShift Operators on your laptop using Red Hat CodeReady Containers and Red Hat Marketplace

Red Hat CodeReady Containers (CRC) is the quickest way for developers to get started with clusters on Red Hat OpenShift 4.1 or newer. CodeReady Containers is designed to run on a local computer. It simplifies setup and testing by emulating the cloud development environment locally with all of the tools that you need to develop container-based applications.

Red Hat Marketplace is an open cloud marketplace that makes it easy to discover and purchase the certified, containerized tools you need to build enterprise-first applications. It was created to help developers using OpenShift build applications and deploy them across a hybrid cloud. Red Hat Marketplace works on any developer workstation that is running CodeReady Containers.

This article guides you through the steps of setting up Red Hat Marketplace and installing containerized products in your local CodeReady Containers-based OpenShift clusters.

Continue reading “Install Red Hat OpenShift Operators on your laptop using Red Hat CodeReady Containers and Red Hat Marketplace”

Share
Enable OpenShift Virtualization on Red Hat OpenShift

Enable OpenShift Virtualization on Red Hat OpenShift

Imagine an information technology (IT) world where everything is ideal: Every company has switched over to cloud-native applications, every application is containerized, everything is automated, and the IT people see that the world is good. Things are not so ideal in the real world, though, as we know. Applications remain tightly coupled with traditional virtual machine (VM) resources such as software libraries and hardware resources. The effort to migrate them from VMs to containers seems insurmountable, requiring years of dedicated spending and hours from developers and software architects.

The dilemma is that companies want all of their applications to eventually run on containers, but they also need to support applications running on VMs until that glorious shift happens. Given that application migration from VMs to containers will happen over the long haul, some companies are exploring a lift-and-shift approach. In theory, lift-and-shift would let us migrate tightly-coupled legacy applications to a container platform like Red Hat OpenShift. Rather than rewriting application code, developers would simply write interfaces (essentially, code with patterns) that are compatible with the existing structure.

Unfortunately, this scenario is unrealistic for legacy projects involving hundreds of application modules and packages. Therefore, it is logical to ask: What if there was a way to support existing applications running on virtual machines and new applications running on containers in one unified container-based platform?

Luckily, there is a way: Use a Kubernetes-based platform like OpenShift.

In this article, I introduce OpenShift Virtualization, a feature for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (OCP). OpenShift Virtualization allows you to run and manage virtual-machine workloads alongside container workloads.

Note: As of version 2.4 when CNV went GA, Container-Native Virtualization was renamed OpenShift Virtualization.

Continue reading “Enable OpenShift Virtualization on Red Hat OpenShift”

Share