RHEL

RPM packaging: A simplified guide to creating your first RPM

RPM packaging: A simplified guide to creating your first RPM

The concept of RPM packaging can be overwhelming for first-timers because of the impression a steep learning curve is involved. In this article, I will demonstrate that building an RPM with minimal knowledge and experience is possible. Note that this article is meant as a starting point, not a complete guide to RPM packaging.

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How to set up a LAMP stack quickly on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta

How to set up a LAMP stack quickly on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta

Have you tried the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 (RHEL8) Beta yet? Read on to learn how to stand up a LAMP stack on top of RHEL8 Beta quickly, and play around with new features built into the operating system.

A LAMP stack is made up out of four main components, and some glue. The first main component in a LAMP stack is Linux. In my example, I’m using Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta for that, which gives me a secure operating system, a modern programming environment, and user-friendly set of tools to control it.

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Changes made to the Libabigail ABI change analysis framework in 2018

Changes made to the Libabigail ABI change analysis framework in 2018

This article is for people interested in the long-term maintenance of software systems that expose application binary interfaces (a.k.a. ABIs) to other systems. That long-term maintenance involves detecting and analyzing inevitable changes in the ABIs and assessing whether these changes allow the maintained systems to stay compatible with the components with which they interact.

In this article, I describe what happened to the ABI change analysis framework that I worked on during 2018: the Abigail library (Libabigail) and its associated set of tools. The goal is not to list the myriad changes that happened throughout releases 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, and 1.5 that occurred during that year, but I will walk you through the main changes that happened and put them in perspective.

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Introduction to using libFuzzer with llvm-toolset

Introduction to using libFuzzer with llvm-toolset

“Fuzzing” an application is a great way to find bugs that may be missed by other testing methods. Fuzzers test programs by generating random string inputs and feeding them into an application. Any program that accepts arbitrary inputs from its users is a good candidate for fuzzing. This includes compilers, interpreters, web applications, JSON or YAML parsers, and many more types of programs.

libFuzzer is a library to assist with the fuzzing of applications and libraries. It is integrated into the Clang C compiler and can be enabled for your application with the addition of a compile flag and by adding a fuzzing target to your code. libFuzzer has been used successfully to find bugs in many programs, and in this article, I will show how you can integrate libFuzzer into your own applications.

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How to install GCC 8 and Clang/LLVM 6 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

How to install GCC 8 and Clang/LLVM 6 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

There has been a lot of work to improve C/C++ compilers in recent years. A number of articles have been posted by Red Hat engineers working on the compilers themselves covering usability improvements, features to detect possible bugs, and security issues in your code.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta ships with GCC 8 as the default compiler. This article shows you how to install GCC 8 as well as Clang/LLVM 6 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. You’ll be able to use the same updated (and supported) compilers from Red Hat on both RHEL 7 and 8.

If you want your default gcc to always be GCC 8, or you want clang to always be in your path, this article shows how to permanently enable a software collection by adding it to the profile (dot files) for your user account. A number of common questions about software collections are also answered.

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Creating and deploying a Java 8 runtime container image

Creating and deploying a Java 8 runtime container image

A Java runtime environment should be able to run compiled source code, whereas a development kit, for example, OpenJDK, would include all the libraries/binaries to compile and run the source code. Essentially the latter is a superset of the runtime environment. More details on OpenJDK support and lifecycle can be found here.

Red Hat ships and supports container images with OpenJDK for both Java 8 and 11. More details are here. If you are using Red Hat Middleware, the s2i images shipped are also useful to deploy, for example, on Red Hat Openshift Container Platform.

Note that Red Hat only provides OpenJDK-based Java 8 and 11 images. With that said, there will certainly be situations where developers would like to create their own Java runtime images. For example, there could be reasons such as minimizing storage to run a runtime image. On the other hand, a lot of manual work around libraries such as Jolokio or Hawkular and even security parameters would need to be set up as well. If you’d prefer not to get into those details, I would recommend using the container images for OpenJDK shipped by Red Hat.

In this article we will:

  • Build an image with Docker as well as Buildah.
  • We will run that image with Docker as well as Podman on localhost.
  • We will push our image to Quay.
  • Finally, we will run our app by importing a stream into OpenShift.

This article was written for both OpenShift 3.11 and 4.0 beta. Let’s jump right into it.

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Time zone data (tzdata): 2018 data format changes and Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Time zone data (tzdata): 2018 data format changes and Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) needs time zone information in order for all applications in the operating system to correctly print local time. The GNU C Library (glibc) makes use of the tzdata package in order to make APIs such as strftime() work correctly, while applications such as /usr/bin/date make use of this information to print the local date.

The tzdata package contains the data files documenting both current and historic transitions for various time zones around the world. This data represents changes required by local government bodies or by time zone boundary changes, as well as changes to UTC offsets and daylight saving time (DST).

This article describes three variants of the tzdata time zone data format that were introduced in 2018 and how tzdata changes will be made in Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

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Podman and Buildah for Docker users

Podman and Buildah for Docker users

I was asked recently on Twitter to better explain Podman and Buildah for someone familiar with Docker.  Though there are many blogs and tutorials out there, which I will list later, we in the community have not centralized an explanation of how Docker users move from Docker to Podman and Buildah.  Also what role does Buildah play? Is Podman deficient in some way that we need both Podman and Buildah to replace Docker?

This article answers those questions and shows how to migrate to Podman.

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Using eXpress Data Path (XDP) maps in RHEL 8 Beta: Part 2

Using eXpress Data Path (XDP) maps in RHEL 8 Beta: Part 2

Diving into XDP

In the first part of this series on XDP, I introduced XDP and discussed the simplest possible example. Let’s now try to do something less trivial, exploring some more-advanced eBPF features—maps—and some common pitfalls.

XDP is available in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta, which you can download and run now.

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How to install Java 8 and 11 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta

How to install Java 8 and 11 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta

With Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8 Beta, two major versions of Java will be supported: Java 8 and Java 11. In this article, I’ll refer to Java 8 as JDK (Java Development Kit) 8 since we are focusing on the development aspect of using Java. JDK 8 and JDK 11 refer to Red Hat builds of OpenJDK 8 and OpenJDK 11 respectively. Through this article, you’ll learn how to install and run simple Java applications on RHEL 8 Beta, how to switch between two parallel installed major JDK versions via alternatives and how to select one of the two JDKs on a per-application basis.

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